Yearly Training Plans for Jumpers

Posted In: The Classics

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    B Hobbs on #15654

    Been doing some research….

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    K Rackley on #82074

    No weight room, or is that a given?

    It seems pretty good (although I’m a novice in training).

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    B Hobbs on #82078

    This is just on the track work

    Nick Newman
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    Nick Newman on #82079

    General periodation model is decent…

    i’d drop end bounding before the comps start…

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    B Hobbs on #82081

    yeah it is very general but figured I would share.

    That is interesting that you would drop all bounding type drills. I feel that bounding is a skill that can easily be lost if not continually trained. Plus it is vital for the triple jump. I also think the skipping which i normally do over power hurdles (which is grouped in with bounding) is important for timing and rhythm of the penultimate and pulling through take off needed in all jumping events.

    When looking at this…it is for all jumpers (high, long, triple, vault) outside of technical work and weightroom.

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    B Hobbs on #82082

    This is my first time sharing my training on this board and would like to see what other coaches have as well….general guidelines to training…I love to compare and contrast what I am doing vs others

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #82083

    Well, i have TONS and TONS of research on LJ training from all over the world. (I’m writing a book on it)

    So feel free to ask stuff if you like…

    I wouldn’t drop bounding. I would drop endurance bounding…during comps i would only use what i call specific bounding (see bounding thread) which is much more specific, faster, less volume and higher intensity.

    I like your program. Looks very simular to a european style (i used to train that way). So with some fine tuning i think it would be very good…

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    B Hobbs on #82088

    I create training for 3 weeks with the 4th week being a recover. Every 8th week we test where as You and Mike test every 4.

    Yeah most of what I do is European….After making my initial program style I went online to compare with others and say that it is very similar to the European style. I also am in contact with a Cuban coach who trains a Triple Jumper from the Netherlands and we agree that our programs are very similar in construction as well.

    What makes the “American” training different from say mine, the Cuban, and European?

    One of the most difficult things to wrap my head around is weekly periodization.
    ex: SUN- light, M- High, T- Medium, W- Light, TH- High, FR- High, SAT- OFF

    My question is what everyone thinks a high day vs light day is. Could a High day be a really heavy technical day or are we strictly talking intensity level?

    I follow a protical similar to yours where i think I saw that you mention before was….

    Week 1 – Technique emphasis
    Week 2 – Speed emphasis
    Week 3 – Endurance emphasis
    Week 4 – Rest/Test emphasis

    I go…

    Week 1 – Endurance
    Week 2 – Tech
    Week 3 – Speed
    Week 4/8 – recovery / test

    Mine is kind of like a mini yearly periodization rolled into 3 weeks (base training, specific training, bigger stronger faster.

    Final Question is how would you set up an intensity for the 3 weeks on I listed above, for the 3 general phases I listed in the excel spreedsheet (General, Specific, Comp).

    I know that’s a tall order. Thanks in advance

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #82089

    I create training for 3 weeks with the 4th week being a recover. Every 8th week we test where as You and Mike test every 4.

    Yeah most of what I do is European….After making my initial program style I went online to compare with others and say that it is very similar to the European style. I also am in contact with a Cuban coach who trains a Triple Jumper from the Netherlands and we agree that our programs are very similar in construction as well.

    What makes the “American” training different from say mine, the Cuban, and European?

    One of the most difficult things to wrap my head around is weekly periodization.
    ex: SUN- light, M- High, T- Medium, W- Light, TH- High, FR- High, SAT- OFF

    My question is are we only taking about intensity here. Could a High day be a really heavy technical day?

    I follow a protical similar to yours where i think I saw that you mention before….

    Week 1 – Technique emphasis
    Week 2 – Speed emphasis
    Week 3 – Endurance emphasis
    Week 4 – Rest/Test emphasis

    I go…

    Week 1 – Endurance
    Week 2 – Tech
    Week 3 – Speed
    Week 4/8 – recovery / test

    Mine is kind of like a mini yearly periodization rolled into 3 weeks (base training, specific training, bigger stronger faster.

    Final Question is how would you set up an intensity for the 3 weeks on I listed above, for the 3 general phases I listed in the excel spreedsheet (General, Specific, Comp).

    Ok, firstly IF your going to do mini blocks in a 3 week cycle i certainly would not start with Endurance. Start with Tech then speed then End. For many reasons really, but mainly becuase of importance and fatigue levels corresponing with the training.

    How i prefer to do loading for a 4 week block is like this, (load = intensity x volume)

    GP)
    wk 1 – 90%
    wk 2 – 80%
    wk 3 – 70%
    wk 4 – 50%

    SP)
    wk 1 – 95%
    wk 2 – 85%
    wk 3 – 75%
    wk 4 – 50%

    Comps)
    wk 1 – 100%
    wk 2 – 85%
    wk 3 – 50%
    wk 4 – 50%

    In terms of load. I agree with the energy system training theme. You can have a high load everyday and not over train if you switch energy system training in the correct way.
    Short approach jump session are generally not going to be high intensity. But they can be high in volume and thus still have high load.

    And major differences with American systems and the rest of the world. Speed is much more of a focus than jump work. The grouping of certain training means seems different as well. American’s seem to be very science based and less practical based as well. Many of the programs done throughout the world for jumpers work really well and American coaches may say that from a science perspective their set up is wrong…

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    B Hobbs on #82099

    Yeah it makes more sense with loads than just “high, medium, low” like we find in many publications.

    However I have always looked at like this

    Week 1- Jumpers endurance (what dominates this weeks training: heavy bounding, 150m – 300m)

    Week 2- Technical (what dominates this training: runways, last 4 steps, film)

    Week 3- Speed (what dominates this training: stride length+frequency work, first 6 steps, short approach jumps, 20m – 60m)

    GP)
    Week 1- 80%
    Week 2- 85%
    Week 3- 90%
    (idea is to slowly empty the tank and refueling during week 4)

    SP)
    Week 1- 70%
    Week 2- 100%
    Week 3- 90%
    (focus on tech week and create similar movements at higher speeds in 3)

    Comp)
    Week 1- 70%
    Week 2- 95%
    Week 3- 85%
    (ending ideally w/ week 4 being a big meet)

    Like to come out of meet weeks with a lighter load to get the feet back under the athlete.

    I tell my athlete

    Week 1- “re-tune”
    Week 2- “re-fine”
    Week 3- “re-engage”
    Week 4- “re-ward”

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    RussZHC on #82124

    While I am not a jumps coach (except in a pinch) I find

    One of the most difficult things to wrap my head around is weekly periodization.
    ex: SUN- light, M- High, T- Medium, W- Light, TH- High, FR- High, SAT- OFF

    My question is what everyone thinks a high day vs light day is. Could a High day be a really heavy technical day or are we strictly talking intensity level?

    the same thing and have played around with ideas that allow for a “cumulative” sort of judgment…so even within a day if you are looking at say three parameters, one can be high but the other two then need to be “low/light” if the day total is to be medium or one can be high and the other two medium if the day total is to be “high” with the thought that if all three parameters for a day are “high” it should be a competition with recovery for some days after or the peak of a training phase.
    As a theoretical example heavy lifting w relative high total rep numbers (from the lift session) would be “high” and if one then did lots of block starts (high CNS) and relatively high number of say 120 repeats (high intensity energy system) you would be “toast” for a few days (of course it depends on the time between bouts of training).

    For me with the above thought it appears like, over time, you end up with a lot of medium days (say average) that contain “high” spikes of one or two elements.

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    RussZHC on #82126

    You almost end up with a “rocks/paper/scissors” thing where one item trumps another and to me the one that trumps all is the relative state of the CNS so greatest care must be taken as to where that work is put (density and intensity) as it may control not just that day or remainder of that day but have quite an influence on the next and maybe two days later.

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #82131

    Yeah it makes more sense with loads than just “high, medium, low” like we find in many publications.

    However I have always looked at like this

    Week 1- Jumpers endurance (what dominates this weeks training: heavy bounding, 150m – 300m)

    Week 2- Technical (what dominates this training: runways, last 4 steps, film)

    Week 3- Speed (what dominates this training: stride length+frequency work, first 6 steps, short approach jumps, 20m – 60m)

    GP)
    Week 1- 80%
    Week 2- 85%
    Week 3- 90%
    (idea is to slowly empty the tank and refueling during week 4)

    SP)
    Week 1- 70%
    Week 2- 100%
    Week 3- 90%
    (focus on tech week and create similar movements at higher speeds in 3)

    Comp)
    Week 1- 70%
    Week 2- 95%
    Week 3- 85%
    (ending ideally w/ week 4 being a big meet)

    Like to come out of meet weeks with a lighter load to get the feet back under the athlete.

    I tell my athlete

    Week 1- “re-tune”
    Week 2- “re-fine”
    Week 3- “re-engage”
    Week 4- “re-ward”

    Your basically asking your athlete to go into a technical phase the week after doing a very hard and high volume bounding week. This is far from ideal and i would never do it like this. Yout set up has all the technical (high focus) type stuff happening during a time when they are fatigued both muscularly and CNS wise. I don’t why you would do that.

    Also, unloading for a competition at the end of week 4 should START towards the end of week 3. 85% load the week of competition is not ideal either…

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    Participant
    Chad Williams on #82132

    Great thread.

    I like the “re-tune”, “refine”, “re-engage”, “re-ward” slogan.

    In the fall we may start off with 6 step jumps. That would be the re-tune. Then try to refine it the next week and see if we can improve upon what has already been established. In the third week, we would bump back to 8 steps, hence the re-engage. Then during the reward week, we come back to 6 steps.

    The volume of the high intensity days varies very little throughout the year. In order to stimulate the CNS, I believe there is a certain amount of reps that must be hit in order to get the affect you want to achieve. Therefore, late in the season, I often play with density, giving LONG rest periods between bouts, almost to the point of boredom on the athletes part.

    I also like to set up the next day by ending with an activity that will prime the system. Vern and Carl have both talked about this in blogs before. For example, if Monday we are doing a more neuromuscular based day, I might end with some standing triples to prime them to TJ the next day. The same goes for wednesday, we could end with some hurdle hops to prime the system for vertical lift in the LJ.

    The one thing I am currently compiling, is logging when the big performance is made and taking a look at the breakdown of the auxillary exercises. Too often, I think that things like sand walks, ankle exercises, and smaller type activities are not quantified as well as they could be. And after the big performance, I tend to give less neural work and increase the amount of low intensity activities in order to allow the CNS to recover. I often find while some things are great on paper, the real world never plays out quite so perfectly.

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    Eric Broadbent on #82134

    When you would get into the specifics about the sprint training. You mention that this would be identical for HJ, LJ, TJ, PV. I feel like the sprinting training would be different for a High Jumper compared to the rest of of the group. I know you want to train a High Jumper to be as fast as possible and have good accel but they never hit top speed or even close to it so wouldn’t the sprint aspect be slightly different and maybe you have slightly more focus on another area. Just my thoughts.

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