Why improving your Vertical Jump Doesn’t improve your Dunk

Posted In: Blog Discussion

  • Avatar
    Participant
    Eric Broadbent on #121641

    There are tons of misconceptions in the athletic world but one of the one’s that really bugs me is all the hype around improving your standing vertica[See the full post at: Why improving your Vertical Jump Doesn’t improve your Dunk]

    Avatar
    Participant
    Eric Broadbent on #186640

    https://www.dunknow.com/?gclid=CMbHsrXOgLsCFeUDOgodemQA3A

    had to laugh when I saw this

    Avatar
    Nicole on #231837

    I love reading your articles and I like using them in my program. I’ve had a lot of success with them. I’ve experienced few injuries, but people keep telling me that, at age 12, I shouldn’t be lifting because it will stunt my growth. What do think about it? Should I be lifting and what should I be doing? One more thing. I’ve been wanting to go to New Jersey over the summer to train with you but don’t know the living conditions or expenses and how I would do it. Thanks forgreat advices.

    http://bestverticaljumpin8weeks.blogspot.com/

    Avatar
    Participant
    Mike Young on #231838

    Hi Nicole. You can definitely keep lifting. There’s ZERO evidence that growth can be stunted by weight training. Stick to basic movements: pushups, squats, pullups or assisted variations of them when needed. BTW- Neither Eric nor myself are in New Jersey. We’re both coaches at my training center (Athletic Lab) in Cary, NC.

    Avatar
    Jordan Allen on #231839

    I can dunk from a standing position using my vertical alone (both one and two hand dunks), and can do a 180° dunk, but I can’t dunk with a running start. I want to so on a fast break I can run up, leap off one foot, and simply put it down. Are there any work outs for me to learn the run up? Is it even possible, or am I stuck with my standing dunks? (I’m 6’4, so I don’t see why I can do it that way).

    Avatar
    Participant
    Mike Young on #231840

    Being able to jump off 2 feet is very different from jumping off 1 foot. Most people are significantly better at one of the options. The best way to get better at something is to do it. Get used to single leg takeoffs. Start by running as fast as you can comfortably take off and gradually increase your speed as you adapt. Also, try emphasizing single leg lifts like step ups, lunges, etc.

    Avatar
    Austin on #231841

    I am 22yrs old. Im about 5 foot 8 (?) And 188 pounds. I have a pretty average wingspan and when I get a running start I just barely miss the bottom of the net. However, I think my jumping form is rather poor. Would it be unrealistic for me to want to dunk a basketball?

    Avatar
    Participant
    Mike Young on #231842

    Hey Austin-
    It would be hard but not impossible to dunk. If you were able to 1 hand dunk you’d need to increase your vertical jump by about 20-22 inches which is very ambitious but not impossible.

    Avatar
    Austin on #231843

    Based on my description is there a specific set of activities you would recommend me starting? Also, I have very large calf muscles. I don’t know if that impacts my potential lol

    Avatar
    Participant
    Mike Young on #231844

    Big calve muscles aren’t great for sprinting but are less of an issue for vertical jumping. I’d stick to the tried and true basics….moderate to heavy weight squats and plyometrics specific to the takeoff you use for dunking.

    Avatar
    John Sade on #231845

    Hi mike with a standing jump I can get my head to the bottom of the net, but off a running start I barely graze the rim. What should I do?

    Avatar
    Participant
    Mike Young on #231846

    Are you comparing 1 foot takeoff to 2 foot takeoff? Many people are MUCH better at one compared to the other. If you want to get better at a one foot takeoff you’ll need to practice that specifically. Single leg plyos and strength work will help. Also, when people are much better at standing vs running jumps they usually have an eccentric strength deficit. Try to build up your eccentric strength through strength work that emphasizes slow eccentric phases, fast-braking, or eccentric overload via the 2-up-1-down method. For more info, check out this article: http://elitetrack.com/slow-down-to-speed-up/

    Avatar
    Mike Goss on #231847

    hope it isn’t too late for Eric to get this…..Between you and Joel Smith at Cal Berkeley this writing may be among the best ever explanations on the art of jumping. I’ve studied plyometrics since 1975………ok I’m 60. It’s “shock training” defined by the Russians. Anyone who studies jumping must explore Verkhoshansky and Starzynsky. I’ve either downloaded, uploaded, exploded, or promoted jump programs for decades! You are correct!! VOLUME is CRITICAL; QUALITY and SPECIFICITY is REQUIRED. Go to the weight room to jump high and not to 1RM (debatable)
    My top lifts; modified cleans, snatches especially power snatches……poor form? pulls with foot extension & trap bar deadlifts performed quickly and leaving the floor (more in mindset than literally) – go 3-5 reps with primary lifts, work the core, glutes, hamstrings with simple and deliberate movements. the Roman chair or glute ham chair is great!!!! If you train for the running jump…….learn how it feels!!!! you do not reach to jump high…..you connect the kinetic chain and feel the syncing from butt to floor. Train your feet, achilles, and fascia. That’s my 2 cents worth and I’m restricting my input. Also, Eric, Holm is a prime example…..check out Werner Gunther on YouTube…amazing! he was not predominantly FTIIX – his normal fiber type was more like a 1500 runner. His FT fibers were huge!! That isn’t coming from me, check Henk Krajenhoff (bad spelling). He’s as intelligent as a neurosurgeon. My 7’2.5″ high jumper had a standing 38″ and my 7’1/4″ jumper had a 25″ ….. barely could dunk at 6’3″ and 155; the secret he was great with Olympic lift skills and skinny strong. He couldn’t out bound the top two girls on a mid DI program. Mike Young is a Master. Never stop searching and you will never stop learning; the soul is made of the art and science connection!

    Avatar
    Mike Goss on #231849

    Very true on the 1 and 2 step approach. I met a guy many years ago; he was 6’2 and could touch the top of the backboard…….unbelievable! he was a two foot leaper. I’d describe his tech as a middle hitter in volleyball. From fairly short runs he had the quickest block step and his upper body showed the same type of explosiveness. I saw him run to the rim with that roadrunner stop and boom! his head was completely over the rim. Check the Romanian, Russian, and Polish guys around 6′ to 6’2 youtube.. a few are super skinny with little definition or mass, but they 1/4 squat big weights and work the upper body with kips, pull ups, and a lot of swinging movements. I feel that it really connects the core and links in with the posterior chain. Quad dominance will get you tendinitis and little joint mice really quick. Thus goes your primary movers and then adapt to poor mechanics and more overuse.

    Avatar
    Jennifer J. Rasmussen on #231850

    This information will show you how to increase your vertical jump by up to 10 inches.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.