When Plateauing Is a Good Thing: Extending Peak Performance During the Competitive Phase

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  • Mike Young
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    Mike Young on #15211

    After the 2 day video hiatus, here’s another one from yours truly. Like a couple of the others, this one’s from the HPC ELITETRACK Gold Medal Clinic. In this lecture I look at the concept of peaking and talk about ways to lengthen the stretch of time an athlete remains in a state of competition preparedness.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #76015

    Thanks for putting this up.

    If these biomotor abilities train and detrain at varying rates, why do people feel compelled to subject them all to the 48 hour rule?

    Does this make anybody realize that doing high intensity work 3 x week( Sp, Plyos, MB, LB weights ) might not be necessary?

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #76016

    Your talking about keeping it from detraining not improving…If you want to keep improving then you need to do anaerobic work very regular…For continued supercompensation effect, 3 times a week/ 48 hour rule works very well…

    Question though…

    Mike spoke about anaerobic qualities not lasting as long without training…and aerobic lasting longer…i always thought it was the opposite…distance runners lose shape very quick if they stop running for a day or so…? thoughts please…

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #76022

    Remember that the context / target audience of the talk is for speed-power athletes. Also, don’t discount the OCD nature that is so common among the best distance runners (which makes them feel like they HAVE to train every day) and the fact that distance running is not a 1:1 equivalent of the biomotor ability we call endurance.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    BIONIC86 on #76104

    If these biomotor abilities train and detrain at varying rates, why do people feel compelled to subject them all to the 48 hour rule?

    Does this make anybody realize that doing high intensity work 3 x week( Sp, Plyos, MB, LB weights ) might not be necessary?

    I guess what Mikes getting at is, once you have completed your development period, and built up the entities you require, you can get more bang for your buck if ur time is used more ergonomically. If this is true then it is important to undertand the rates of decline of the biomotor abilities, perhaps noting how much detraining you can get in a specific quality without it taking away from the competitive event.

    So in response to Mr Glove, I think the work done during the week depends on how you have prepared, and how much you need to maintain what you have got. If allot of speed work is done and is of high quality, maybe additional plyometrics would be overkill. Conversly, if mechanics are not great and injury easily occurs during speed work, a coach might decide to use speed work cautiously and bolster it with the plyos.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #76158

    [quote]If these biomotor abilities train and detrain at varying rates, why do people feel compelled to subject them all to the 48 hour rule?

    Does this make anybody realize that doing high intensity work 3 x week( Sp, Plyos, MB, LB weights ) might not be necessary?

    I guess what Mikes getting at is, once you have completed your development period, and built up the entities you require, you can get more bang for your buck if ur time is used more ergonomically. If this is true then it is important to undertand the rates of decline of the biomotor abilities, perhaps noting how much detraining you can get in a specific quality without it taking away from the competitive event.

    So in response to Mr Glove, I think the work done during the week depends on how you have prepared, and how much you need to maintain what you have got. If allot of speed work is done and is of high quality, maybe additional plyometrics would be overkill. Conversly, if mechanics are not great and injury easily occurs during speed work, a coach might decide to use speed work cautiously and bolster it with the plyos.[/quote]

    I’m more interested in the hormonal implications and how they may be taken advantage of more often. Can we make more “hormonal or CNS recharging pit stops” along the way?

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    BIONIC86 on #76159

    So how do u apply the hormonal implications into your system?

    Mike Young
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    Mike Young on #76185

    I’m more interested in the hormonal implications and how they may be taken advantage of more often. Can we make more “hormonal or CNS recharging pit stops” along the way?

    There are a variety of way to influence endocrine profiles by modulating volumes and intensities. Also inducing high lactate profiles is one of the primary triggers for GH. The underlying idea is that you need to essentially reset baseline levels of endogenous anabolic hormones through prolonged exposure to appropriate training. It seems these levels can be maintained for 3-5 weeks even after training used to generate them has ceased or fallen off. Beyond this time period ‘refreshers’ are needed.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    BIONIC86 on #76191

    OK, how well how long is prolonged exposure. Does it differ for different hormones? do you take blood draws, or are you making decisions in response to the research?

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #76206

    So how do u apply the hormonal implications into your system?

    My post was more of a question than anything else.

    Are there ways that we can manipulate volume, intensity, frequency, density, etc… beyond the typical 3:1 or 2:1 set ups to optimize the hormonal environment leading to improved performance and recovery?

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