What’s the most important weight room lift

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      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #8284

        If you had to choose only one lift you could do for a track athlete (don’t ask me why you’d only be limited to one) what would it be?

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        acbjr on #19157

        without a doubt i would choose the clean and jerk

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        lorien on #19158

        clean

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        Daniel Andrews on #19159

        deadlift

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        wisconman on #19160

        snatch

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        john-c-s on #19161

        Back squat, as well as a max weight exercise you can get power benefits by varying the way it is performed.

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        acbjr on #19162

        while i partially agree with john c-s about the squat being the best simply because you can do so many variations with it, if you were only limited to one variation of an exercise the clean and jerk with a full catch on the clean is a tough one to beat.  however, lets hope it never comes to this where you are only limited to one lift.

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        utfootball4 on #19163

        squats its the foundation to all other lifts..

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        rrheyn on #19164

        as a beginner squats for me, Dl's are very important, but i find them difficult to manage properly without the right technique.
        Whats the max squat or DL the best elite sprinters can perform ?

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        anthony on #19165

        Well, i dont think there is a lift that  directly transfers to sprinting… I believe what eventually transfers to the track, is  the general strength of the organism (the charlie francis concept)…I consider the general organism strength as the OVERALL recruitment capacities of the athlete. Given the strength gained in a movement range crossovers to all other movement ranges (maybe due to complex neuro-hormonal interactions) makes lifting very general in nature, and i dont think squats are necessarily better than bench …

        Bench is VERY useful in a sprinter's program, imo
        1) Its a tool for max strength expression. Its a big compound movement recruiting around 35% of the total musculature of the body, and based on the general organism strength concept, it makes your whole body stronger even the legs (indirectly)
        2) Its a very useful lift to maintain general strength qualities, during injuries where u can't do sprints, or squats or anything involving the lower body. Its also useful during tapers.
        3) It strengthens the organism, without undue fatigue to the legs, which are SPECIFICALLY trained to produce strength through actual sprint work anyways

        So i consider it an equally useful lift as squats.

        Strength= CNS power + muscle cross sectional area+ leverages…

        So if you have very strong lifts relative to your bodyweight, and you dont even have good leverage for the lifts themselves (eg. long femurs for the squat, or long arms/small ribcage for bench), then rest assured you have a very strong neural output. That general quality is what transfers, i think.. And this quality can also be developed through track work! So each thing influences the other, max speed influences strength in the gym and vice versa

        those were some random thoughts (influenced by CF)

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        star61 on #19166

        Well, i dont think there is a lift that  directly transfers to sprinting… I believe what eventually transfers to the track, is  the general strength of the organism (the charlie francis concept)…I consider the general organism strength as the OVERALL recruitment capacities of the athlete. Given the strength gained in a movement range crossovers to all other movement ranges (maybe due to complex neuro-hormonal interactions) makes lifting very general in nature, and i dont think squats are necessarily better than bench …

        Bench is VERY useful in a sprinter's program, imo
        1) Its a tool for max strength expression. Its a big compound movement recruiting around 35% of the total musculature of the body, and based on the general organism strength concept, it makes your whole body stronger even the legs (indirectly)
        2) Its a very useful lift to maintain general strength qualities, during injuries where u can't do sprints, or squats or anything involving the lower body. Its also useful during tapers.
        3) It strengthens the organism, without undue fatigue to the legs, which are SPECIFICALLY trained to produce strength through actual sprint work anyways

        So i consider it an equally useful lift as squats.

        Strength= CNS power + muscle cross sectional area+ leverages…

        So if you have very strong lifts relative to your bodyweight, and you dont even have good leverage for the lifts themselves (eg. long femurs for the squat, or long arms/small ribcage for bench), then rest assured you have a very strong neural output. That general quality is what transfers, i think.. And this quality can also be developed through track work! So each thing influences the other, max speed influences strength in the gym and vice versa

        those were some random thoughts (influenced by CF)

        If you read CF more carefully, you will see that he actually focuses on posterior chain training in the weight room. Benchpress is probably the best overall upperbody exercise, but does very little to increase posterior chain strength. YMCA's and other clubs are full of kids who bench but never squat. Their legs are still small and weak, and they have no lower body power, and less speed.

        Squat is number one on my list, followed by power cleans.

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        wisconman on #19167

        do you guys use wrist wraps when you're doing cleans?

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        utfootball4 on #19168

        do you guys use wrist wraps when you're doing cleans?

        When i did performed ol's i would use straps for the hang clean/snatch but never for the power clean/snatch.

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        Zach Batcho on #19169

        no i feel it takes away from grip strength. it also backs it harder to bail on a lift with straps. with straps i've actually had the bar slide down my shin and ripe off a nice section of skin because i couldn't get away from the bar quick enough. never had a similar problem when i don't use straps.

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        utfootball4 on #19170

        no i feel it takes away from grip strength. it also backs it harder to bail on a lift with straps. with straps i've actually had the bar slide down my shin and ripe off a nice section of skin because i couldn't get away from the bar quick enough. never had a similar problem when i don't use straps.

        You shouldn't have to bail from the weight, should always know your limits. I hate when coaches bring up grip strength, if you are trying to develop grip strength then use other means.

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        Zach Batcho on #19171

        there is a difference between knowing limits and using heavy weight. i see people miss at 95% of there max all the time and that is under their "limit". and if you dont push the envelope every now and then you won't know your limit. not using straps is a way to build grip strength without focusing on grip specific things. saves on time.

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        utfootball4 on #19172

        there is a difference between knowing limits and using heavy weight. i see people miss at 95% of there max all the time and that is under their "limit". and if you dont push the envelope every now and then you won't know your limit. not using straps is a way to build grip strength without focusing on grip specific things. saves on time.

        "You're a runner not a weightlifter."  why are you going 95% if your an athlete? There are other ways you can work on grip strength and still use strap for hang clean/snatches for example pullups, chinups or you can add 2-3 sets into your BB circuits. 

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        winnesota on #19173

        Whats so bad about doing 95%?

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        mortac8 on #19174

        Hang cleans are the most important lift for me.  If I pr in hang clean and don't run well, I think the universe implodes.

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        rrheyn on #19175

        Good points, but what i do with this. When i run long distance my bodyweight on one leg is 2 x my own bodyweight, when i do sprints it goes up to 4 x my own bodyweight and when i go for long jumps and triple jumps  it is 6 X bodyweight on one leg. I am 70kg, so 420 kg comes on one leg. What is the need for light weighttraining , even when i do long runs. Its still 2 x 70kg=140 kg that comes on one leg. My coach let me train with weights from 20kg – 40kg! I train now on my own and get from 50 kg to 110 kg in Sq's, its notting yet,ist only 150 % but i feel i get stronger and faster.

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        Zach Batcho on #19176

        utfootball the comment "You're a runner not a weightlifter," is reference to my coach telling me its alright if my squat or clean max doesn't keep a great deal as long as i get faster. from personal experience i've seen more runners perform better under a powerlifting/weightlifting program than under a bodybuilding program. high weight near maximal and very low weights has always allowed me gain strength without unwanted hypertrophy.

      • Nick Newman
        Participant
        Nick Newman on #19177

        i would always say the clean….but this season it doesnt seem to me all that important…so id say squat…

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        Zach Batcho on #19178

        squats are good because there are so many variations you can do with them. just by changing the bar, method of resistance like adding bands, or creating isometric tension you can add in a decent amount of different stimuli.

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        Derrick Brito on #19179

        clean easy.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #19180

        For me it is cleans or squats. Bench press doesn't even make my top 5. I think I could really accomplish the same things with either of those two exercises but I'd just need to alter other aspects of the program (assuming I stick to the hypothetical task of only doing one exercise) depending on which one I chose.

        As a related note to some of the comments above, I frequently use percentages upwards of 90% in training. Overall, I'd say that most of our 'work' sets for the OLs are about 85% although we do use lower weight sets. One of the thing I like about heavier loads in group settings is that they force the athlete to train with the desired intensity. If for example, the exercise prescription called for 5 x 3 @ 70% with an emphasis on speed, the athlete could pretty easily just go through the motions because the weight is so low. This can be problematic in group settings where it's difficult to monitor every single set.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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