Warming Up. Stretches.

Posted In: Flexibility

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        swiftyer on #10622

        After reading through this forum I realize that my warmup may be holding me back from my true potential. I was always given this warmup and I’ve followed it but now I’m thinking second thoughts. I was wondering if anyone could add to or chnge my current warmup entirely. Your advice and information will be greatly appreciated by myself and several of my fellow track team members.
        :yes:
        -warm-up run( 600-800m )
        -body rotations(arms,neck,hips, the works)
        -static stretching
        -Mock drills
        (A’s, B’s, Butt-kicks)
        -strides 3×80(50%,70%,80%)
        -bounding 2x30m
        -Careoke(mind my spelling)2x30m
        -quick feet x3
        -leg swings(forward and sideways)16 swings each leg and style.
        -lunge walks and lunge variations) 2x30m

        Well that’s bascially it…

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        fraek on #43409

        What do you run, and -warm-up run( 6-800m ) does this mean that you do 6 800’s ? or does it mean 600m-800m

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        swiftyer on #43410

        I sprint 100m,1×4 and occasionally 200. 6-800 means 600-800

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        dma1973 on #43411

        How does it take?

        My warm up is around 1200 – 1600m runing, skipping etc.

        In that I include drills, joint rotations, runthroughs. I do hurdles drills at the end. I than do specific stuff, depending on the event. IE Starts for sprints and hammer for hammer.

        I tend not to do static stretches. I tend to do active stretches if I do any.

        I allow my athletes to do a minimal amount – more for psychology or anything else.

        My warmup takes 60 minutes.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43412

        I think your warmup looks quite good. The only thing I’d suggest is that it make a better progression from general to specific actiivties and have a more linear increase in activity intensity. For example, the strides and / or bounds should probably be the last thing I’d do in the warmup rather than having it somewhere in the middle.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        swiftyer on #43413

        So mike, are you saying that its ok to be doing the static stretches at the beginning? I’ve learned from this forum that there is less power output from static stretches??? Help me out here

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        simon on #43414

        I’m sure Mike will answer your question, but my my two pennies worth…my understanding is that static stretches followed by dynamic activity will not hinder your power output. I like the pattern jog, static stretch, general drills, event imitations, compete. (Example for a sprinter: jog, static, sprint drills, strides, a few block starts, compete.) I have used this pattern with field athletes at all levels up to World Championships and have found no reason to change. I like to have the same pattern (as close as possible) before all training sessions as well. One or two athletes pefer not to stretch specific body parts before competition/training (eg I have a discus thrower that doesn’t like to stretch her chest muscles before throwing — so instead she does this after practice.)

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        lorien on #43415

        There seem to be a fair amount of information about stretching (e.g. static vs. dynamic) and warm-up routines here. General guidelines seem to follow personal preferences rather than absolute advice. I donâ??t think static stretching can be a great asset in the warm-up phase, albeit with some reservations:
        – I think some muscles are better suited for light static stretching (during warm-up) than others. Appropriate muscles being: the plantar fascia, the calf-achilles area (very lightly), the lower and upper back, and maybe neck and shoulders. With some reservations: the piriformis, buttocks and the groin area. And with more reservation: quads and hamstrings. I donâ??t think you have to stretch all muscles in an equal way.
        – I also think the stretching can be different before weights, tempo and sprinting or jumping, e.g. avoiding static stretches in the quad/hamstring area before heavy squats, whereas stretching the calves and achilles-tendons before squatting can benefit your technique in the squat due to better flexing and more power (focus) directed towards the hip area that way. Static stretching (including the quads and hamstrings) before tempo can be good idea.

        Joggingâ??stretchingâ??drillsâ??stridesâ??workout seems to be the general approach. However, I have found it better, in some circumstances, to mix the phases. Something like this:
        (1) starting out with some medicine bal work (very light);
        (2) some jogging and more medicine ball work;
        (3) some light stretching (maybe static stretching in the preferred areas mentioned above);
        (4) rest of the jogging
        (5) drills, dynamic stretching (or static if needed), drills, more stretching if needed, drills or strides or jumps (whatever);
        (6) workout

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43416

        Simon and Lorien-
        Nice posts.

        Lorien-
        At the advice of Vern Gambetta I started using a warmup setup like you explained every now and then. I think it works great. Basically it’s just an extension of the general-to-specific concept. Start with really general movement patterns (medball work) and progres to slower running and then dynamic activities / faster running. One of the only drawbacks is that much like with static stretching many kids are brainwashed into believing warmup = 800m run when in fact their are many alternatives.

        Swyfter-
        Everything has a time and a place. I think static stretching works well after a general warmup, especially early on in the year. While the results are quite conclusive that static stretching reduces power output, all studies that I’m aware of have tested following the stretching without any in-between activities. And as Simon suggested, dynamic activities would likely reverse a large percentage of the power output detriment caused by the stretching. As a result, early on in the year, when training is more fitness oriented and less performance oriented, I think static stretching should be a part of the warmup process. As the season progresses and competition specific workout stimulus becomes more important (i.e. athletes need to be able to run AS FAST AS possible), I typically reduce or eliminate pre-power activity static stretching and replace it with more dynamic activities.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        simon on #43417

        Mike,

        Nice summary.

        I am interested in working with Championships level athletes and I believe that one factor that really helps consitant performance is always following the same basic warm-up routine. In a crazy environment it is one of the few parts of the day that this completely within the control of the athlete. They can shut out the world and go through their own familiar routine. This should be taken into account when ‘designing’ a warmup, for example don’t rely on having 200 steep bleacher steps that only exist at your track. If you change the warm up through the training year and between types of session, I’d advise that you stabalise on a routine early pre-season and stay with it throughout the season.

        Just my two (british) pennies worth.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43418

        There are two philosophies to what you’re saying. Personally my warmup doesn’t stay exactly the same but the components and the order of the various components are basically always the same. I’ve seen some programs however use “competition warmup protocols.” I discussed this a little here[/url]. Note that in the example given in the link that the “competition warmup” is some times used during practice situations.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        tjumper on #43419

        I’ve been told that the warm up jog should be minimum 10mins, to really get ur muscles warmed up.

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        lorien on #43420

        [i]Originally posted by tjumper[/i]
        I’ve been told that the warm up jog should be minimum 10mins, to really get ur muscles warmed up.

        Perhaps, if jogging is all you do. However, there are also other ways (more effective than just jogging) that will heat up your body, although, jogging would still be included in the overall warm-up design.
        About the 10-minute rule: perhaps in the deepest phase of the training year, not before an important competition. You will not find any finalist in a major championship (jumps & sprints) that will jog for 10 minutes in a row before the ultimate battle.

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        utfootball4 on #43421

        do u guys think doing 9-10 diff static strecthes for quick 10sec hold is bad before racing??

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        ws100 on #43422

        before racing? Like the morning of the race, or like right before?

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        utfootball4 on #43423

        before as in warmup.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43424

        No I don't think it would be a problem. I don't personally incorporate any static stretches into my pre-comp warmup but I've seen plenty of successful programs that have.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        glyn on #43425

        Lorien, What other ways do you find effective for warming the muscles up?

        At the moment i jog 1mile for my warm- up…Would you say thats about right or are there more useful methods?

        Thanks

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        flight05 on #43426

        we do a dynamic warmup for 800 meters.
        we will do various drills like arm circles, backwards running, jumping jacks, lunges, etc for 50 meters and then we will jog the other 50 meters in btw each 100 m segment for a total of 800.
        we then do light static stretches followed by dnyamic movements, dynamic stretches, hurdle drillls, running form drills, and strides.

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        runningman on #43427

        Last month, a chiropractor was performing a new type of therapy for injuries that have caused or were brought about by incorrect or inefficient motions when running.  He was saying that your pain was caused by a binding of two muscles instead of smooth sliding across each other  during a movement.  ( He wasn't saying that this encompasses all injuries but are a kind of injury )

        He actually performed a session on 3 athletes who had severely altered there techniques because of the pain.  Right after the session was done they ran a few hundred feet and experience (I'm guessing) a 70% recovery of their effective motion which had been hindered by the pain of the binding of muscles.  So his technique as I saw was a success.  Their pain was also gone.

        He also told us that static stretching before a race can have the negative effect of arousing the part of the nervous system responsible for relaxing and sedating you.  He said it is better to do dynamic stretches (perhaps where you are moving as you stretch) which cause your nervous system to make you active.  He said making use of a towel while you pull your leg through stretching motions forward and back or side to side for example is a dynamic stretch.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43428

        Lorien, What other ways do you find effective for warming the muscles up?

        At the moment i jog 1mile for my warm- up…Would you say thats about right or are there more useful methods?

        Thanks

        I'm not Lorien (duh) but I there are better means of warming up than a 1 mile jog. Look through some of the warmup protocols and get some ideas. Including activities like skipping, calisthenics, dynamic flexibility / mobility, and other activities seem to be a better alternative than just jogging. Also, try to make the warmup specific to the tasks of the session. If you're doing a speed session for instance it would be helpful to include some activities (buildups, maybe some low level plyos, etc) that will really help to prepare you for the work ahead.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        runningman on #43429

        :bouncy: :bouncing:

        Would build-ups be fore a short-distance workout have a small increase in length and intensity from beginning to end?  What general distances and intensities would you recommend?  Also, what are plyos?

        Thanks,

        Running man

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        utfootball4 on #43430

        :bouncy: :bouncing:

        Would build-ups be fore a short-distance workout have a small increase in length and intensity from beginning to end?  What general distances and intensities would you recommend?  Also, what are plyos?

        Thanks,

        Running man

        400m builds are the best

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        Carson Boddicker on #43431

        400m builds are the best

        That's a pretty damn long buildup run.  I usually would keep it 5-15 seconds (~35-130m) in length. 

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        heartsonfire on #43432

        I have recently cut out jogging from my warm up program and I'm trying to get my athletes to do the same.  My warm up consists of dynamic work, light stretching of the the hammys, calves, quads, and groin.  Then I add some more dynamic work, move to first step quickness, sprint drills, and stretching if needed.  At a meet it's quite a bit different.  As long as I am sweating, feel warm, I know I'm ready to go.  It's more about making sure you have a good sweat, warm, rather than how much you stretch.

        COMPETITION WARMUP
        Part 1 â?? in flats
        1. 4x50m jog
        2. 50m backward run
        3. 50m Skip with arm circles
        4. 50m Caricoa
        5 50m Side swings
        6. 50m A's front&side-5 every 10m – R leg
        7. 50m A's front&side-5 every 10m – L leg
        8. 50m jog
        9. 30m buildup â?? walk back
        10. 30m buildup â?? walk back
        11. 50m-10m knee-chest/10m knee-elbow
            10m knee-shoulder/20m lunge walk
        12. 10x iron cross, scorpion, hurdle seat
              exchange, leg swings
        13. 30m buildup â?? walk back
        14. 30m buildup â?? walk back
        15. 4x10contacts + 10m run-out
            A's, SLB, FL

        Part 2 â?? in spikes
        1. 30m acceleration
        2. 30m acceleration
        3. 20m falling start â?? hand on knee
        4. 20m falling start â?? hand on knee
        5. 20m start from blocks
        6. 20m start from blocks
        7. Relax
        8. 20m start from blocks
        9. Leg shaking
        10. Race

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        flow on #43433

        i recently started using bbc on recovery days and love them.  now i´m wondering what you guys think of using a  general strength circuit like bbc/bwc/mdc consisting of 12/14 excises/1min rest as the general part of warm up followed by increasing specific things?
        for example:

        gsc
        200m of running+dynamic stretching
        mach drills (2series)
        build-ups (3-5×60-100m)
        short acc. (2/3×10-15m  relaxed)

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43434

        I think it would work just fine but I'm not really sure why you'd prefer doing it as a warmup instead of as the actual workout. I wouldn't do it on high intensity days though because you'd either have to reduce the volume or intensity of the low intensity work to ensure the high intensity work is kept at a high level (in which case you wouldn't get the primary benefits from that type of work) or you'd have to sacrifice the quality of the high intensity work.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        flow on #43435

        i thought of it as a warm up for high intensity days.  i noticed that on low intensity days i always felt very fresh and "activated"  after the first half of the bbc (the second half than usually killed me ; )  so i concluded that using that first half  as a warm up might be cool.
        but i get what you're saying.  it would practically mean that i would do some sort of gs work 6 days a week,  3 of those paired with high intensity lifting and sprinting.  that would be killer.
        thanks

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43436

        I'm not saying it wouldn't work ok. Vern frequently uses medball and calisthenic circuits as warmup. My point was that if you're trying to get the traditional benefits of weightlifting circuits at the same time as using them for warmup, you might get compromised results.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        flow on #43437

        thanks.  i just intended them for warmup on high intensity days

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        jazzyjustjazzy on #43438

        I was curious if warm-up stretches should involve general stretches and dynamic stretches( full range of motion )… what kinds would be best recommended?

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43439

        I was curious if warm-up stretches should involve general stretches and dynamic stretches( full range of motion )… what kinds would be best recommended?

        Use both. There are benefits to both. I generally reserve static stretching for low-intensity days and / or post-workout.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        winnesota on #43440

        While doing dynamic stretches would it be bad to "bounce"- meaning if I were stretching my hamstring on the ground reaching for my toe with some speed after I had already dynamcically stretched it?  Just so that I feel the full range of flexability in that muscle?

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        aussie800m on #43441

        i have a guy i compete against who went through school winning nationals for 800m and 1500m, and he's current our u20 national champ for 800m (1:48 i think). anyways a few meets ago i was warmin up with him before our race, we done the usual jog, static stretch and all but then he was doing this stretch that was like he starts off sitting on the ground with both legs out infront. he'd touch both his toes at once then he'd roll back so that the back of his neck was still touching the ground but his toes were also touching the ground above his head [if that makes sense] then he'd roll back down and touch his toes. he was really putting some speed into it. is this stretch suitable or not a good idea, i was just waiting for something to snap while he was doing it.

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        winnesota on #43442

        Damn, that sounds crazy!

        Do you mean once he touched his toes he would lay down and bring his legs past his head so that he could touch his toes to the ground behind his head?

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        aussie800m on #43443

        yeh exactly.. he really picks up speed when hes's doin it..
        my thought is either his hammys will give way or something will pull in his back from the bending

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #43444

        If I'm understanding that stretch correctly, my guys do it about 3x a week. We call it a dynamic plough and have never had any complaints other than when we do it during AM pre-meet shakeouts. These are typically at 8-9am and the vertebral discs are still saturated  with fluid (from sleeping) which makes the stretch more difficult than usual.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        winnesota on #43445

        Im gonna try it….sounds exciting

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        Jay Turner on #90215

        As far as warmup goes, I usually tell my athletes to make sure to keep their sweatpants on throughout. I’ve found that this seems to make the body sweat, release toxins and enhance stretching. However, I’ve been yelled at a couple times about this by my schools’ athletic trainer. Anyone have any thoughts on this?

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        Miele-Scott on #90217

        that stetch you talk about winnisota, I do all the time after Im about done my stretching. it feels very good if you are properly warmed up.. if its good for you i could not say though haha

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        trck400mrnnr on #90786

        Alright, so I need some back-up here. I have been competing in Track and Field for 10 years (since 7th grade 😆 ) I was lucky enough to have coaches through high school and junior high who were up to date and experienced. I have always performed dynamic stretching and warm-ups. Now I got to college and immediately that was gone. The team sat in circle and static stretched for 10-15 minutes. Which I COMPLETELY disagreed with. If you by any chance had gotten your heart and blood flowing before hand by jogging you just sat down and cooled off. So I continued with my own dynamic stretches and warm-ups. Now we did do “form drills” which were a dynamic warm-up (a skips, b skips, etc.) this was right after sitting for 15 minutes…then right on into the workout. Now I am an assistant coach for this same team and have brought up the stretching routine…but alas…to no avail. The head coaches are “die hard” distance runners. This doesn’t bode well for the sprinters and jumpers. SO what research can you find me and what advice can you give me to help either change their minds or find a way to save our sprinters!!

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        Floppel on #90933

        Have them watch this video:

        By the way, it also contains the “weird” stretch Azz88 mentioned above at about 7:00. There’s also part 2 and 3 which you can find by clicking on the video.

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        Jay Turner on #97132

        Should distance runners use a dynamic warmup? Or is it OK if they do mainly static stretches for pre-race warmup?

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        rainy.here on #100551

        i have a guy i compete against who went through school winning nationals for 800m and 1500m, and he's current our u20 national champ for 800m (1:48 i think). anyways a few meets ago i was warmin up with him before our race, we done the usual jog, static stretch and all but then he was doing this stretch that was like he starts off sitting on the ground with both legs out infront. he'd touch both his toes at once then he'd roll back so that the back of his neck was still touching the ground but his toes were also touching the ground above his head [if that makes sense] then he'd roll back down and touch his toes. he was really putting some speed into it. is this stretch suitable or not a good idea, i was just waiting for something to snap while he was doing it.

        I’ve seen MVP athletes do this.

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