Warming Up. Stretches.

Posted In: Flexibility

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    swiftyer on #10622

    After reading through this forum I realize that my warmup may be holding me back from my true potential. I was always given this warmup and I’ve followed it but now I’m thinking second thoughts. I was wondering if anyone could add to or chnge my current warmup entirely. Your advice and information will be greatly appreciated by myself and several of my fellow track team members.
    :yes:
    -warm-up run( 600-800m )
    -body rotations(arms,neck,hips, the works)
    -static stretching
    -Mock drills
    (A’s, B’s, Butt-kicks)
    -strides 3×80(50%,70%,80%)
    -bounding 2x30m
    -Careoke(mind my spelling)2x30m
    -quick feet x3
    -leg swings(forward and sideways)16 swings each leg and style.
    -lunge walks and lunge variations) 2x30m

    Well that’s bascially it…

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    fraek on #43409

    What do you run, and -warm-up run( 6-800m ) does this mean that you do 6 800’s ? or does it mean 600m-800m

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    swiftyer on #43410

    I sprint 100m,1×4 and occasionally 200. 6-800 means 600-800

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    dma1973 on #43411

    How does it take?

    My warm up is around 1200 – 1600m runing, skipping etc.

    In that I include drills, joint rotations, runthroughs. I do hurdles drills at the end. I than do specific stuff, depending on the event. IE Starts for sprints and hammer for hammer.

    I tend not to do static stretches. I tend to do active stretches if I do any.

    I allow my athletes to do a minimal amount – more for psychology or anything else.

    My warmup takes 60 minutes.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #43412

    I think your warmup looks quite good. The only thing I’d suggest is that it make a better progression from general to specific actiivties and have a more linear increase in activity intensity. For example, the strides and / or bounds should probably be the last thing I’d do in the warmup rather than having it somewhere in the middle.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    swiftyer on #43413

    So mike, are you saying that its ok to be doing the static stretches at the beginning? I’ve learned from this forum that there is less power output from static stretches??? Help me out here

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    simon on #43414

    I’m sure Mike will answer your question, but my my two pennies worth…my understanding is that static stretches followed by dynamic activity will not hinder your power output. I like the pattern jog, static stretch, general drills, event imitations, compete. (Example for a sprinter: jog, static, sprint drills, strides, a few block starts, compete.) I have used this pattern with field athletes at all levels up to World Championships and have found no reason to change. I like to have the same pattern (as close as possible) before all training sessions as well. One or two athletes pefer not to stretch specific body parts before competition/training (eg I have a discus thrower that doesn’t like to stretch her chest muscles before throwing — so instead she does this after practice.)

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    lorien on #43415

    There seem to be a fair amount of information about stretching (e.g. static vs. dynamic) and warm-up routines here. General guidelines seem to follow personal preferences rather than absolute advice. I donâ??t think static stretching can be a great asset in the warm-up phase, albeit with some reservations:
    – I think some muscles are better suited for light static stretching (during warm-up) than others. Appropriate muscles being: the plantar fascia, the calf-achilles area (very lightly), the lower and upper back, and maybe neck and shoulders. With some reservations: the piriformis, buttocks and the groin area. And with more reservation: quads and hamstrings. I donâ??t think you have to stretch all muscles in an equal way.
    – I also think the stretching can be different before weights, tempo and sprinting or jumping, e.g. avoiding static stretches in the quad/hamstring area before heavy squats, whereas stretching the calves and achilles-tendons before squatting can benefit your technique in the squat due to better flexing and more power (focus) directed towards the hip area that way. Static stretching (including the quads and hamstrings) before tempo can be good idea.

    Joggingâ??stretchingâ??drillsâ??stridesâ??workout seems to be the general approach. However, I have found it better, in some circumstances, to mix the phases. Something like this:
    (1) starting out with some medicine bal work (very light);
    (2) some jogging and more medicine ball work;
    (3) some light stretching (maybe static stretching in the preferred areas mentioned above);
    (4) rest of the jogging
    (5) drills, dynamic stretching (or static if needed), drills, more stretching if needed, drills or strides or jumps (whatever);
    (6) workout

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #43416

    Simon and Lorien-
    Nice posts.

    Lorien-
    At the advice of Vern Gambetta I started using a warmup setup like you explained every now and then. I think it works great. Basically it’s just an extension of the general-to-specific concept. Start with really general movement patterns (medball work) and progres to slower running and then dynamic activities / faster running. One of the only drawbacks is that much like with static stretching many kids are brainwashed into believing warmup = 800m run when in fact their are many alternatives.

    Swyfter-
    Everything has a time and a place. I think static stretching works well after a general warmup, especially early on in the year. While the results are quite conclusive that static stretching reduces power output, all studies that I’m aware of have tested following the stretching without any in-between activities. And as Simon suggested, dynamic activities would likely reverse a large percentage of the power output detriment caused by the stretching. As a result, early on in the year, when training is more fitness oriented and less performance oriented, I think static stretching should be a part of the warmup process. As the season progresses and competition specific workout stimulus becomes more important (i.e. athletes need to be able to run AS FAST AS possible), I typically reduce or eliminate pre-power activity static stretching and replace it with more dynamic activities.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    simon on #43417

    Mike,

    Nice summary.

    I am interested in working with Championships level athletes and I believe that one factor that really helps consitant performance is always following the same basic warm-up routine. In a crazy environment it is one of the few parts of the day that this completely within the control of the athlete. They can shut out the world and go through their own familiar routine. This should be taken into account when ‘designing’ a warmup, for example don’t rely on having 200 steep bleacher steps that only exist at your track. If you change the warm up through the training year and between types of session, I’d advise that you stabalise on a routine early pre-season and stay with it throughout the season.

    Just my two (british) pennies worth.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #43418

    There are two philosophies to what you’re saying. Personally my warmup doesn’t stay exactly the same but the components and the order of the various components are basically always the same. I’ve seen some programs however use “competition warmup protocols.” I discussed this a little here[/url]. Note that in the example given in the link that the “competition warmup” is some times used during practice situations.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    tjumper on #43419

    I’ve been told that the warm up jog should be minimum 10mins, to really get ur muscles warmed up.

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    lorien on #43420

    [i]Originally posted by tjumper[/i]
    I’ve been told that the warm up jog should be minimum 10mins, to really get ur muscles warmed up.

    Perhaps, if jogging is all you do. However, there are also other ways (more effective than just jogging) that will heat up your body, although, jogging would still be included in the overall warm-up design.
    About the 10-minute rule: perhaps in the deepest phase of the training year, not before an important competition. You will not find any finalist in a major championship (jumps & sprints) that will jog for 10 minutes in a row before the ultimate battle.

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    utfootball4 on #43421

    do u guys think doing 9-10 diff static strecthes for quick 10sec hold is bad before racing??

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    ws100 on #43422

    before racing? Like the morning of the race, or like right before?

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