USA Track & Field Coaching School / Frans Bosch

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  • Vern Gambetta
    Participant
    Vern Gambetta on #13198

    I was privileged to attend the USA Track & Field Coaching at Loyola University in Chicago from June 30 to July 3. I attended the presentations by Frans Bosch to Sprints and Jumps group. He did six presentations on six topics. I found them all very thought provoking and stimulating. He is an individual who literally combines art and science. He is an artist and brings the creativity and the eye of

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    mortac8 on #71101

    Keeping this very simple, I wish Bosch had more impressive results.  Taking a high jumper who jumps 2.31, telling him his mechanics are very bad, training him for 4 years, and jumping 1 PR during that period???  How's Rens Blom doing this past couple years? 

    Frans, you wrote a book on running/sprinting.  How about producing a sprinter?

    Vern asked the question I had.  "Lots of guys look great doing drills but when it comes to the actual sporting movement, they cannot perform well".  Bosch answered with "ah but the drills are non-specific" or something to that end.  Coordination is a function of this and a function of that…  To me it seems like Bosch is training coordination as a biomotor ability and ignoring speed, strength, and endurance.  It appears his guys spend years perfecting drills, for what?  a 1% improvement?

    Bosch's book is great, his illustrations are great.  Everything is great until he starts talking about exercise prescription.  If you want to overload the sporting movement why not break out the Vertimax, plyo sled, power runner, weight vest, thigh weights?  Sign me up when he produces better improvements.  I'm not one to talk but then again I'm not the one speaking at a national conference.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #65468

    Let's make this the official "Frans Bosch thread" to discuss his different and in many cases, controversial training methods.

    For those who didn't attend, Frans gave a series of six presentations with some interesting training ideas. While I wasn't able to attend each one in full (because I was teaching myself), I got to see at least 30 minutes of each one and also had the opportunity to speak to Frans quite a bit between talks.

    For those that were there (and I know there are several on this board)…what did you like? What didn't you like? Will you use anything that he discussed?

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    mortac8 on #65469

    Yes someone please comment.  Call me a dumbass, whatever, just say something so I know if I'm way off base.  Like I said I think Frans' explanation of kinetic anatomy or whatever you want to call it is excellent.  Some of his training ideas seem strange to me.  I want to understand what others think of his training ideas.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #65470

    He described training with great style and beauty….I don't think he can provide good information how to do it better (read get athletes faster in a good program).

    Some great science and it was worth going to but his weight training was borderline. Too jingoistic with the Netherlands stuff.

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    flight05 on #65471

    someone fill us in on what controversial methods he uses. what are his abstract theories?

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    J Kilgore on #65472

    I have not read the book yet…but from his presentations I think that improving coordination can help improve speed, strength, tech., etc…but not focusing on it to the extent that other work is cut dramatically.  I agree with Mort that he seemed to be using coordination as a biomotor ability and I think that it can be worked in with the other biomotor abilities rather than put ahead of all of them.  Couldn't some of his coordination exercises be used in the same capacity that we use running drills?  Or using them on lower intensity type days to work as a form of general strength?

    His overall weight program didnt seem so great, however I think that his clean variations could be used on lower % weight room days. 

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #65473

    someone fill us in on what controversial methods he uses. what are his abstract theories?

    Specificity was really stressed, practically every aspect of training is what we would consider high CNS demand, very little periodization, and the exercise selection was quite different. Also, many seemed to dislike his whip-from-the-hip term to describe the late swing phase mechanics.

    I spoke with Frans quite a bit outside of his lectures and here's what I gathered would be a sample week for a speed power athlete (I might be mixing up the order but I don't think it mattered all that much):

    Mon
    Max Strength Weights

    Tues
    Full Approach Jumping

    Wed
    Sprinting under 60m

    Thurs

    Stiffness Jumping

    Fri
    Coordination Weights

    Sat
    Stiffness jumping

    Sun (This would be about the only 'low-intensity' day)
    Balance / Proprioceptive development

    Other than a brief warmup, the listed module would be about all that was done for that particular day. The training volumes were very low, set and rep schemes were at least partly determined by the athletes, and emphasis was on quality of work.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #65474

    Does anyone who was in attendance plan on using his single-leg clean progression?

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    J Kilgore on #65475

    Could it fit on lower% days?  I don't think it can replace regular OL's, but couldnt it be used in the same light as say a db snatch, just to change things up?

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    rj24 on #65476

    What constitutes the "Stiffness jumping" days in the routine? Can anyone give an example?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #65477

    What constitutes the "Stiffness jumping" days in the routine? Can anyone give an example?

    Stiffness jumps are plyos performed with an emphasis on reducing ground contact time and joint amortization.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    rj24 on #65478

    Mike, sorry for all the questions, but how many reps are these exercises traditionally done for?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #65479

    Mike, sorry for all the questions, but how many reps are these exercises traditionally done for?

    Bosch said he never goes over 5 reps for any exercise but he also mentioned that he often lets his athletes do however many sets and reps that they choose to do and he just cuts them off when they are not able to perform the exercise correctly.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #65480

    Could it fit on lower% days?  I don't think it can replace regular OL's, but couldnt it be used in the same light as say a db snatch, just to change things up?

    I think they could work for this role. I personally am not a fan of the exclusive (or even predominant) use of single leg movements for a couple reasons but I do think that practically everything can have a time and a place in any given training program.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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