The Truth is Finally Coming Out: PEDs in Baseball

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  • Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #15335

    Since my first love in sport is track and field, I’ve always been a little miffed at the double standard that the media and general public have against the sport with regards to drug use when compared to the more ‘prime time’ sports like football, baseball, and hockey. If you listed to the main stream media, you’d think every single athlete in track is dirty and little would ever be mentioned

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    ELITETRACK Founder

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    maxx on #77683

    Good post Mike! I predicted this back in August 2007. You can read my blog and my predictions from 2007 here: https://coachbook.ning.com/profiles/blogs/arod-and-steroids

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    sabd on #77684

    MLB is starting to figure it out. I think the other two big leagues(NFL and NBA) have a long way to go.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77705

    Well, Dana Stubblefield just got probation regarding similar revelations: https://is.gd/iMUP.

    Nothing to do with the NFL cracking down but at law enforcement is at least taking it seriously. I’m not necessarily sure this is a good thing though. Seems like right now resources and personnel might be better devoted elsewhere (building infrastructure, fixing economy, improving education, etc).

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77723

    More came out today-

    *He was on record in 2007 stating he’d never used anything (expected).
    *He was actually warned by the COO of the players union about an unannounced test he was to receive later that month….basically confirming that the testing was a sham and that the problem was systematic and the testers were in cahoots with the athletes.

    So now, Petite, Giambi, Cleamons, A-Rod, Bonds, Canseco and McGuire have all been implicated or proven to use PEDs….I can’t think of ANY other sport where practically ALL of the top people have been proven to use PEDs. That list includes what is arguably the 5 biggest stars of the past 15 years. When you factor in the fact that they’ve essentially been caught despite no real testing procedures it’s easy to see that doping in baseball is more widespread as in track. The equivalent in track would be Usain Bolt, Asafa Powell, Jeremy Wariner, Mo Greene, and Michael Johnson all having positive doping tests.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    utfootball4 on #77725

    More came out today-

    *He was on record in 2007 stating he’d never used anything (expected).
    *He was actually warned by the COO of the players union about an unannounced test he was to receive later that month….basically confirming that the testing was a sham and that the problem was systematic and the testers were in cahoots with the athletes.

    So now, Petite, Giambi, Cleamons, A-Rod, Bonds, Canseco and McGuire have all been implicated or proven to use PEDs….I can’t think of ANY other sport where practically ALL of the top people have been proven to use PEDs. That list includes what is arguably the 5 biggest stars of the past 15 years. When you factor in the fact that they’ve essentially been caught despite no real testing procedures it’s easy to see that doping in baseball is more widespread as in track. The equivalent in track would be Usain Bolt, Asafa Powell, Jeremy Wariner, Mo Greene, and Michael Johnson all having positive doping tests.

    ESPN just said he tested positive for Parabolan(trenbolone hexahydrobencylcarbonate) and Test.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77726

    He probably thought it was just flax seed oil and was rubbing it on his joints like Bonds 😉

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77740

    This is VERY interesting…

    A-Rod tainted by players union’s mistake; how will he respond?

    When Alex Rodriguez was approached by Sports Illustrated writer Selena Roberts in the University of Miami gym on Thursday and presented with the bombshell that he failed baseball’s 2003 steroid survey test, Rodriguez’s immediate reaction was to tell her, “You’ll have to talk to the union.”

    That’s all these players know. The union will protect them. The union will save them. It always does, and it always will.

    That’s what Rodriguez thought, anyway.

    But here, in the most important issue to face the players union, the union has instead sunk him. The union has absolutely killed him.

    Sure, Rodriguez brought this controversy on himself with that failed drug test, as SI reported exclusively on Saturday. But this was one taint that A-Rod didn’t have to endure, and shouldn’t have had to endure.

    Those test results were supposed to have been destroyed, expunged, wiped away. And they would have been obliterated, had the union not kept them around for no good reason.

    “The Players Association screwed up royally,” one player agent said on Saturday after hearing the revelation that the first and biggest name on the infamous 2003 steroid list had leaked out. “They fought for something that didn’t mean a thing. Well, now they got [Barry] Bonds. And they got A-Rod. Now we have to wonder: Who else is going to fall?”

    That steroid survey list from 2003 was supposed to be anonymous, nameless and faceless. And the list of 104 player failures was supposed to be destroyed immediately after it was tallied up. That was the plan. The only need for the litany of names was to determine whether enough failures would mean that testing would begin in earnest, with penalties, in 2004.

    The list wasn’t supposed to last.

    But here it is, six years later, and the list still exists. It exists on paper. And it exists in the minds of the tens of baseball people, and lawyers and lab people who have seen it.

    That list would have been long gone if not for the union, several baseball people say. Players union COO Gene Orza worked long and hard to try to pare down the list. Orza’s mission, according to baseball people, was to find enough false positives on the list to drive the number of failures so far down that real testing wouldn’t be needed in 2004 or ever.

    Orza wanted to get the list down below the five percent threshold for testing to go away entirely. But try as he might, he could not drive it down quite that far. After months of trying, Orza couldn’t do it, and baseball announced that a curiously amorphous 5-7 percent of players failed the 2003 survey test, enough to ramp up the testing in 2004, much to the union’s dismay.

    According to multiple baseball sources, Orza spent way too much time studying the results in hopes of lowering the number. And while Orza was playing with the paperwork, BALCO struck, foiling his grand scheme.

    And when BALCO investigators asked for the results of the players linked to that scandal, Orza did what came naturally to him, which was to fight. He had a history of winning his fights, so that gave him confidence that he could win this fight.

    But this time he didn’t win. The feds subpoenaed all the records instead of just the BALCO boys.

    All 104 players who tested positive were now at risk.

    “He wouldn’t give up the BALCO names,” one baseball person said of Orza, “so instead, [the federal government] got every name.”

    All 104 names were now in the hands of the feds, a time bomb that’s been ticking for six years and finally went off on Saturday with the report of Roberts and David Epstein of SI that Rodriguez, baseball’s best player and heir apparent to the all-time home-run record, tested positive for testosterone and the steroid Primobolan.

    Really, with the list of positive tests out there, it was bound to happen sooner or later. The mere existence of the list severely inhibits the option of plausible deniability for A-Rod. Since the list still exists, it’s possible it can still be made public. Plus, it’s been seen by too many folks by now.

    Truly, it’s a wonder that it’s taken this long for even one name to come out.

    The biggest name is out, and that’s just A-Rod’s luck. The 1-in-a-104 shot came in for him.

    Being a superstar has its burdens — and A-Rod has certainly had his share — but this time he will really be tested. While Rodriguez wasn’t to be found on Saturday (he is said to be vacationing out of the country), people who know him well wonder how he’ll handle this. This is much tougher than a Josh Beckett fastball in October.

    That other stuff about his marriage and love life, about Madonna and the others, about whether he hits in the clutch or not, is a true Yankee or not, was liked or disliked by Derek Jeter, was an A-Fraud or the real deal, all that stuff put together, all that might have annoyed him.

    This might torment him. With or without outside help, Rodriguez is the most talented player in baseball. He has all the skills. But he also has an insatiable need for approval, and that’s going to be harder to come by now.

    “He is very sensitive,” a former close friend said. “I’d be worried about him.”

    This will also weigh on the $200 million Yankees that were all set to greet new superstars CC Sabathia and Mark Teixeira in spring training in a couple weeks. Now they have The Yankee Years, former manager Joe Torre’s tell-a-lot book that throws criticism at Rodriguez, general manager Brian Cashman and several prominent former Yankees. And that’s not even one percent of the story now.

    The other 99.9 percent is Sports Illustrated’s report, which casts a pall over what could have been a championship team and all-time great player entering their new luxury palace in the Bronx. The great story of 2009 has been altered for the worse now.

    The next decade’s story has been changed, too. The Yankees have A-Rod for nine more years (and if anyone thinks they’re getting out of it, just recall that the Yankees only weeks ago brought back Andy Pettitte, who admitted to HGH use, without a hint of reservation.). They have $250 million left to pay A-Rod, plus another $30 million in incentives for passing various all-time home run milestones, a march that will now likely bring no more cheers than Barry Bonds’ pursuit of Hank Aaron.

    Rodriguez has said nothing yet beyond his original comment to SI, which was in full, “You’ll have to talk to the union … I’m not saying anything.”

    There could be claims that the natural or prescribed response in such a situation is to talk to the union. But it sure doesn’t look great to say nothing else when confronted with such damaging news.

    This is Rodriguez’s problem now, and he’s going to have to step to the plate pretty soon. This is the biggest at-bat of his career. Whatever the answer is, it has to be better than what Mark McGwire tried, or certainly what former teammate Roger Clemens threw out there.

    And, if someone else needs to step forward, it’s Orza.

    Besides his foolish delay in destroying the list, according to the SI bombshell story three major league players said Orza tipped off Rodriguez that he was about to be tested in September 2004. A similar accusation was made about Orza and one unnamed player by admitted steroid dealer and star witness Kirk Radomski in the Mitchell Report. Orza skated on that one, possibly since the mention was lost in that 311-page page report, and perhaps because it was just one unnamed player.

    This is much more memorable. This involves the greatest player in the game.

    So far Orza isn’t talking, telling SI when confronted on Friday, “I’m not interested in discussing that information with you.” (The union issued a statement saying that “there was no improper tipping of players…continued in link above.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77805

    Rodriquez stops denying.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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