Tellez Interview

Posted In: Tom Tellez

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        utfootball4 on #60207

        i listen to it earlier today, gonna have to listen again bc i feel asleep towards end.

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        Kebba Tolbert on #60208

        Tellez is never "really exciting" or full of bells and whistles… just damned good  :bigsmile:

        I must admit thoughn that being in Puerto Rico at the NACACTFCA Congress abot 6 weeks ago and watching him break down start practive video of Carl, Leroy, Marsh, et al made me giddy.

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        utfootball4 on #60209

        his training is soo old school style from the article mike posted.

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        Dave Hegland on #60210

        Great stuff on hurdle tech in there.  He really got rolling towards the end.  He brought up interesting stuff about the take-off and it's enormous impacts on the hurdle clearance.  Specifically the take-off distance.

        It seems to me that one of the really key things in the hurdle take-off is to have the shin of the lead leg still not yet opened when the trail leg toe leaves the ground.  This, in my experience, is a very difficult thing to accompish.  There is a great picture of AJ on the TFN cover slightly after toe-off.  It's incredible the kind of stretch that he's placed on the trail leg.  This is a great visual representation of what Coach Tellez is talking about with his rubber band analogy.  The pre-stretch is something else.  You can see that his trail has no choice but to fly through.  Awesome stuff from an awesome coach.

        Tony Wells talks about the knees being closed on landing going into the take-off, which is another great thing to look for on film, and at least with my athletes (and myself) again very hard to achieve.  It was nice to hear Tellez really drill home the importance of the take-off.  I think I too often get pre-occupied with other things that ultimately result from it.

        He was also very adamant about the lead hand not crossing the chest.  I think this is so important because an arm action that is initiated by crossing the chest sets up a very horizontal backward arm swing in which the lead hand does not cut below the knee, and the lead arm is not a long enough lever to offset the more massive trail leg.

        Thanks for the link, KT.  Some good stuff coming from that Cdn program, I look forward to seeing who else they've got on tap (and hearing pt 2 of the tellez stuff).

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        Kebba Tolbert on #60211

        his training is soo old school style from the article mike posted.

        I've got about 10 Tellez lectures on a variety of topics (e.g., discus, shot, hurdles, jumps, sprints) and they are all awesome. He's really not a training theory guy along the lines of say Boo and Dan. I'm not saying that his training theory was wrong, just that his strong point was the technical emphasis, development, and refinement at an A++ level.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60212

        All Tellez talked about in the interview was force production and technique.  "Old school" is not what I would call it.  He and Pfaff are genuises, so is Boo.  Also, most of the Tellez articles mike has are circa 1983 before most of the latest research came out, but still in his 1983 article he was on top of how much the 100m dash is dictated by the acceleration phase.

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        Kebba Tolbert on #60213

        Part 2 of the interview is up now

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        mortac8 on #60214

        That website is amazing.  Thanks for the heads up, kebba.

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        utfootball4 on #60215

        That website is amazing.  Thanks for the heads up, kebba.

        the interview is horrible. lol

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        Daniel Andrews on #60216

        I actually liked the interview.

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        utfootball4 on #60217

        I actually liked the interview.

        his training methods etc is soo old school, he couldn't even answer the reactive questions, and his ideas on max speed don't make sense – run 350 and 400m?

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        Daniel Andrews on #60218

        He was talking about maintenance of maximum speed as the reason to run 1 350 or 400m all out.

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        utfootball4 on #60219

        He was talking about maintenance of maximum speed as the reason to run 1 350 or 400m all out.

        i understand that and if that was the case still dont make sense, i think he was asked how to develop max speed?.. just bc u have a runner who can run a good 300 r 400 doesnt mean they will finish the 100m strong, thats so ole school, and cf speaks about this on his van dvd, about Marita Koch vs the record holder in 50m.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60220

        yes, he was about developing max speed, but he answered that in Part 1 with Force Production against the ground and he expanded on it in Part 2 to include maintaining maximum velocity with respect to 200m.  He's had some of the world's fastest 200m runners and the one thing they always did was finish the race strong.  You are trying correlate what he was speaking with the 100m race only.  He was talking about the complete sprinter 100m-400m.  He also talked about how you can't do this when fatiqued.  He's a technique oriented coach with respect to speed, he figures that the best technician can win and if you work technique right you'll hold max speed longer and provide more speficic force to the ground properly.    With he and Pfaff you have to look deeper into what they are saying for it to make a lot of sense. 

        My only argument is that you are a Charlie Francis guy only.  Charlie has done some real nice work, but I think the best coaches are ones who can take in what other coaches are saying relate that to their philosophy and even apply it when they can.     

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        utfootball4 on #60221

        i guess I'm biased since i cant anything over the 100m. lol

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        utfootball4 on #60222

        also most of the athletes i worked cf system is great for them, i dont have many 200 and 400 guys.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60223

        I know you are, but that's cool, there are things that he said that very relevant to the 100m race.  Such as working technique first, then strength by working with that same technical mindset in the weight room.  Strength and Power do hide a lot of technical flaws.

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        utfootball4 on #60224

        I know you are, but that's cool, there are things that he said that very relevant to the 100m race.  Such as working technique first, then strength by working with that same technical mindset in the weight room.  Strength and Power do hide a lot of technical flaws.

        u have to admit some of his stuff is old school, for example the article mike posted spoke about long runs etc.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60225

        That article was from 20+ years ago that's why it was so old school.  It doesn't mean that things in it are not relevant to today.

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        utfootball4 on #60226

        That article was from 20+ years ago that's why it was so old school.  It doesn't mean that things in it are not relevant to today.

        he even spoke about long runs in the interview, i just dont see the point of starting long and slow for a 1 an 2 guy.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60227

        The longest run he talked about in the interview was 800m and if it wasn't that he was talking about his special endurance run to end a session.  Like I said, you're focusing on the wrong things with the interview.

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        utfootball4 on #60228

        The longest run he talked about in the interview was 800m and if it wasn't that he was talking about his special endurance run to end a session.  Like I said, you're focusing on the wrong things with the interview.

        don't see how u can make such a comment, its always interesting listening to another coach speak, but his style wont work for me.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60229

        I can make that comment because you said it was horrible.  I wasn't asking you to accept his philosophy, best several things he said were in fact relevant and specific to today's knowledge of sprinting and training sprinters.

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        utfootball4 on #60230

        I can make that comment because you said it was horrible.  I wasn't asking you to accept his philosophy, best several things he said were in fact relevant and specific to today's knowledge of sprinting and training sprinters.

        of course, i was comparing his interveiw to dan and the german coach. i agree with some of the things tom said in the interview.

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        mortac8 on #60231

        [quote author="danimal9" date="1165799434"]
        I can make that comment because you said it was horrible.  I wasn't asking you to accept his philosophy, best several things he said were in fact relevant and specific to today's knowledge of sprinting and training sprinters.

        of course, i was comparing his interveiw to dan and the german coach. i agree with some of the things tom said in the interview.
        [/quote]

        I wasn't feelin Tom on this one.  I was like wtf is he talking about.  U GOTTA THINK WHILE YOU'RE SPRINTING…etc.  I do not understand.

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        utfootball4 on #60232

        [quote author="utfootball4" date="1165800009"]
        [quote author="danimal9" date="1165799434"]
        I can make that comment because you said it was horrible.  I wasn't asking you to accept his philosophy, best several things he said were in fact relevant and specific to today's knowledge of sprinting and training sprinters.

        of course, i was comparing his interview to dan and the german coach. i agree with some of the things tom said in the interview.
        [/quote]

        I wasn't feelin Tom on this one.  I was like wtf is he talking about.  U GOTTA THINK WHILE YOU'RE SPRINTING…etc.  I do not understand.
        [/quote]

        lol, it was funny. i know mike said he want his runners to think in practice but not doing meets.

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        Daniel Andrews on #60233

        Yes, because all the learning is done during practice.  A great way to think of this is that practices are the homework and meets are the test.

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        trackhenson on #60234

        Tellez confused me a bit when he was talking about the block setup.
        He said that you want the front block setup at 90 degrees and the back block setup at 130 degrees. I fully understand his reasoning, (front- push / back- stretch-reflex) but:

        1. He obviously isn't being literal about 90 degrees for the front pedal, that would be impossible to get set and push out of.

        2. I looked at the photosequence breakdown by Vittori and Pfaff on Carl Lewis, and his pedals are clearly not at 90 and 130. They look more like 60 for the front and 50 for the back.

        Does anybody know what Coach Tellez is talking about?

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        davan on #60235

        He is talking about the angles of the front and back legs respectively.

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        Mike Young on #60236

        He is talking about the angles of the front and back legs respectively.

        Yep. I didn't listen to the interview but this would make much more sense. Research evidence indicates that setting the blocks as LOW as possible is actually the best for acceleration times.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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