Strength needs for TJ

Posted In: Jumps

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    lanceam24 on #12780

    i triple jump for a small D1 college in the southland conference. my pr in high school was like 44'1" so fa my college pr is 45'. i cant seem to get over this hump. i get upset when i jus this and my coach notices it and tells me to stop getting mad because im jumping good im just not strong enough to go further. and that i wont jump a 48' unless i can squat 400 lbs. how true do u think this is?

    [EDIT: Subject changed to reflect topic]

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    mortac8 on #62879

    Again…lies.  You can squat 1000 but if your speed and posture are suboptimal, you may still jump 44'.  I would bet that many of the world's top triple jumpers can't squat over 400.  Strength will probably help but to expect strength progression alone to push your TJ is questionable.

    https://www.athleticslinks.com/art/banks.php
    AL: What are your personal bests for training tests (squat, snatch, bench, etc, and standing long jump, standing TJ, throws over head, speed tests, etc)?

    WB: Believe it or not, I don't remember much. I never did much testing in practice. I did not start seriously lifting until I was 31 years old. Before that, I was just lifting to keep from being injured. I got most of my strength from bounding.

    I did lift but I think my best squat is 250lbs (113.4k) full, 500 lbs (226.8k)quarter squat. I never snatched. My best bench when I was training was 220lbs (100k). However, after retiring I was able to lift 240lbs (108.86k). Don't remeber the standing long jump but I believe it was more than 10 feet (3m04). My best 100m run is 11seconds.

    Mike Young
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    Mike Young on #62880

    Agree with Mortac. Levar Anderson (NCAA champion in TJ at LSU) was never terribly strong and relative to his TJ performances (~57 feet) didn't really have great test numbers in the 30m  or standing jumps. His technique was very good though when he was on and he did a lot with what he had.

    I believe that towards the end of his career John Edwards never squatted and it didn't seem to hold him back.

    I can see throwing out numbers for motivational purposes but they don't correlate well on a one-to-one basis.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    coachformerlyknownas on #62881

    Mike, cant believe you made comment before reading the weblink above your response.  Let me share the salient points:

    AL: What do you think of the current new crop of US jumpers: Davis, Rusan & Bell & who do you think of those guys has the most potential? Can they put the US back into a position of power in what has recently been a European-dominated event?

    WB: I think Kenta Bell has the potential to put the US back in contention. It is a shame that Kenny Harrison quit because if he had continued, I think the triple jump would still be a US event. Davis is strong but lacks the finesse and technical skills of a world record-holder. He reminds me of Charlie Simpkins who I think was probably the most dangerous triple jumper ever to jump.
    If he had learned how to triple jump correctly he would have gone 18.50m. Charlie could hop step into the pit from 42 feet (12.80m) but he never had them move the board back so he could get a good jump in. Charlie had terrible skill but incredible ability. Davis has similar attributes. Don't know much about Rusan.

    AL: Who do you consider to be your greatest rival?

    WB: Mike Conley, could never shake him. However, I think Charlie Simpkins could have been the all-time best triple jumper ever but I did not fear him like Mike because Charlie never understood his weakness and correct it.

    WB: Kenny Harrison is the last of the Willie Banks style jumpers.  If you look at his technique, it was very similar to mine…There is a lack of techicians now because there is no one to teach them. Randy Huntington can teach it, so can I, but most jumpers don't have the ability to do it. They all want to be Jonathan Edwards.

    WB- as a world class, record jumping individual, A1
    WB- as a coach, instructor, role model, "the WB"

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #62882

    Mike, cant believe you made comment before reading the weblink above your response.  Let me share the salient points:…

    Haha. I didn't read it. I actually don't think the comments about WD are totally off base, especially considering when it was likely written. He is undoubtedly one of the more talented individuals to ever compete in the event (maybe the sport?). His raw talent plus the world-class biomotor development from Boo have made him a speed-power beast.

    His technical issues have cleaned up considerably since that was written and much of this is due to the coaching of the best TJ coach in the world. Many of his technical issues were related to nagging injuries. Also, I think it's important to note that the faster one is moving the harder it is to make technical corrections. So while WD, Rusan, and Phillips all have tremendous speed they have all been haunted by technical issues at some point in their career. 

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #62883

    As for Randy being a great TJ coach, I agree. I know and respect Randy quite well and I don't think there's any arguing with his results. The guy is definitely one of the great coaches in TnF. In the TJ though, one could argue that Boo has been a more prolific producer of world class performers.

    As for WB being a great coach, I have no comment.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    cliffordwinburn on #62884

    Too add on from the good stuff from above.  I know a jumper at 53 feet.  He only half squats 315 lbs at 5 sets of 5 for strength.  The catch is like Banks he bounds a lot for his strength.  Also he is incredibly flexible in the hip region.  He could do the splits both ways.  Flexibility of the hips and low back is your best bet for a big wopping jump.  When he jumped, he was able to produce more force and get full extension off of each bound by being that flexible ( so he says).  So maybe thinking about hip extension and flexibility is the problem and not strength.  I have squatted 385 and it does absolutley nothing, except prevent injury.

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