Somatype in Sprinting: How Much is Too Much?

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #17637

    I do think strength training at early levels yields great gains in speed development, but sometimes too much is too much and the added mass backfires. This picture illustrates a lot of what is going on in elite sprinting, and I think Ben Johnson’s squat numbers has hurt sprinting in the US. How much mass and strength is enough? I don’t have the answer, but look at the body types and lifting prog

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    burkhalter on #108997

    Who are the coaching influences of the people coaching these massive sprinters? I do not see how it can be Tellez, Pfaff, John Smith. All of their athletes looked/look muscular yet balanced, proportional and athletic.

    RE: Jamaica….it’s not grass or voodoo training programs that’s for sure.

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #109003

    When Dwain Chambers added 50kg (110lbs) to his back squat, it did not improve his sprint times (as he mentioned himself). Then again, he may have added a significant amount of bodyweight during that stage. I think it’s a balancing act & people don’t appreciate how increased mass can significantly impact times. Allyson Felix is someone I look upto.

    Original link: https://www.dragondoor.com/articles/the-holy-grail-in-speed-training/default.aspx

    “Weyand and his associates proved that simply gaining strength is not enough. Their study showed that the key to faster running was mass-specific force. ‘Mass-specific force’ is just another way to say that it isn’t merely the amount of force applied to the ground that increases stride length; it’s the amount of force in relation to bodyweight”.

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    burkhalter on #109005

    We know Dwain’s story.

    Who is making these gargantuan sprinters?

    And…your point about the weights and cheetahs and Bolt and Lewis and on and on….

    I was listening to a Pfaff lecture today and he talked about how you have some guys (very very few) who do not have to lift, the sport takes care of all of their needs. He called them greyhounds, the really, really wired guys like Lewis or a Bolt. Then he talked about some guys who the weight room benefits but they could still get a lot from other avenues. He then went on to point out those who really have to have the weight room and those individuals lose qualities without weights. In a nutshell……
    It’s a spectrum. Of all the people on this site I can’t think of a true greyhound. Many lean more toward that end of the spectrum but none are the true greyhound.

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #109019

    Anyone got any opinions with regards to Mass-specific force?.

    Some elite sprinters seem to disrespect it.

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    mortac8 on #109020

    When Dwain Chambers added 50kg (110lbs) to his back squat, it did not improve his sprint times (as he mentioned himself). Then again, he may have added a significant amount of bodyweight during that stage. I think it’s a balancing act & people don’t appreciate how increased mass can significantly impact times. Allyson Felix is someone I look upto.

    Original link: https://www.dragondoor.com/articles/the-holy-grail-in-speed-training/default.aspx

    [i]“Weyand and his associates proved that simply gaining strength is not enough. Their study showed that the key to faster running was mass-specific force. ‘Mass-specific force’ is just another way to say that it isn’t merely the amount of force applied to the ground that increases stride length; it’s the amount of force in relation to bodyweight”.[/i]

    It’s the amount of force in relation to bodyweight in .087sec.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #109029

    Anyone got any opinions with regards to Mass-specific force?.

    Some elite sprinters seem to disrespect it.

    What do you mean by “disrespect it?”

    What percent of elite sprinters can cover 30 meters in under 4.00FAT? What percent of elite weightlifters or powerlifters can do the same? If this was the holy grail, wouldn’t we have seen a steady stream of impressive performances by now?

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #109030

    What percent of elite sprinters can cover 30 meters in under 4.00FAT? What percent of elite weightlifters or powerlifters can do the same?.

    So your all for Mass-specific force (30-100m).

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #109044

    I’m for training an athlete in a way that allows them to best advance their speed qualities. Most would agree that strength training plays a role. Success from 30-100 meters begins and ends with good parent selection.

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    Josh Hurlebaus on #109053

    MSF is so easily misinterpreted. Yes higher force compared to mass is helpful, but force isn’t just more power. Its directional. It requires coordination to achieve what is desired. Now add in the fact that the force has to be applied in continually shortening windows throughout the race and you can see why max strength plays an increasingly smaller role in top speed past a certain point. I certainly agree with Carl when he said that Ben’s squat numbers have disillusioned US sprinters with what is required to run fast.

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