Single Leg Anti-Hip Extension

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  • Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #18937

    Pronounced LL is associated with a pelvic position with the anterior superior iliac spine tilted forward. In contrast, a small LL is associated with a pelvic tilt toward the back. In sprint running, this position is generally advantageous for efficient leg return. We hypothesized a negative correlation between LL and hip flexion power, although our results did not confirm this. -Dr. Karine Copaver

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    jeffcubos@gmail.com on #120087

    Isolated psoas activation I can do without. But similar movements with the intention of improved patterning has worked for me.

    I’d say it’s not for everyone and large groups make it difficult to program in since proper technique is paramount, but in a small group setting where the pattern shows room for improvement, I think psoas activation exercises could work.

    That is, until I find something better.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #120090

    Isolated psoas activation I can do without. But similar movements with the intention of improved patterning has worked for me.

    I’d say it’s not for everyone and large groups make it difficult to program in since proper technique is paramount, but in a small group setting where the pattern shows room for improvement, I think psoas activation exercises could work.

    That is, until I find something better.

    Any ideas on track based activities?

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    Participant
    jeffcubos@gmail.com on #120092

    Personally, I think it’s more a matter of rationale for the exercise rather than the specific exercise itself.

    Meaning, I would prefer the intention of “improving the hip flexion pattern” over “psoas activation”.

    So really, it’s a matter of programming in the appropriate drill and doing it correctly.

    That said, if a “sticky quad” – one who’s layers don’t slide properly – is what’s preventing a good hip flexion pattern, then that needs to be addressed. Also, if the individual lacks ideal coordination of the abdominals leading to poor intraabdominal pressure, then I don’t believe the hip can function properly as well. Other factors may still be at play including same or opposite side ground contact, but again, I think it’s more of an issue with rationale and intention for the specific exercise than the exercise itself.

    I know this doesn’t directly answer your question but it’s where my head is at currently.

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