Selected training clips from Athletic Lab (6.11.11)

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  • Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #17595

    It’s been a little while but here’s another installment in the video blog series of how some of my elite athletes are training on the track and at my sport performance training center, Athletic Lab in NC. Just like the others in this continuing series this short video is uncensored and unedited so feel free to critique or ask questions and I’ll try to follow up with why we’re doing what we’re

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    ELITETRACK Founder

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    Participant
    bman on #108640

    The snatch complex, why?

    Why did you choose to do jump squats and hurdle hops in the same session? They seem similar.

    It’s the end of the season, but I didn’t see any one leg multi-jumps, bounds, depth jumps, or other complicated plyometric activity. In a general sense, how do you progress plyos throughout the season, and do you do look at plyos as a separate set of activities from lifting?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #108641

    Good questions.

    Snatch complex- I put it on a top end speed / special endurance day and I like the low load, speed emphasis and plyometric-like loading between the 3 segments.

    I don’t see an issue with jump squats and the hurdle hops. They’re similar in mechanics but so are many things. We did the jump squats to a lower depth as well. The two exercises are on different points on the F-V curve and we finished with the faster jumping activity to .

    We do what many would think to be a surprisingly low volume of plyometrics in general and even less so of single leg work of high intensity. I don’t feel the reward outweighs the risk in performing anything above low volume single leg high intensity plyos like speed bounding, extended bounding, etc.

    I generally progress out plyos more by the impact load at landing which is directly related to the height from which the athlete’s COM drops from at the apex of the preceding jump to landing. In the case of single leg plyos, this point is considered to have essentially double the training intensity / load on the athlete. I also look at things like contact times (generally moving from longer to shorter over the year), degree of amortization (moving from more to less…or greater stiffness), swing phase actions (hoping to mimic a jumpers actions depending on the event), joint angles at contact in flight and horizontal-to-vertical emphasis ratios (moving from horizontal to vertical emphasis over time other than with TJers who keep a balance).

    In general, I don’t necessarily distinguish the training stimulus in the weight room and plyometrics. As you may have noticed in this and the other videos I see them both as a means of developing speed-strength-power by attacking various points on the F-V curve. There are times where we may not do traditional plyometric activities for an entire cycle but the physical qualities that I am working on are addressed in other ways (sprinting, weight room progression, multi-throws, etc).

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    Participant
    Kebba Tolbert on #108685

    Mike,

    What would you call the exercise around 6:55 – pullover situp? What is it’s purpose?

    KT

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #108700

    That’s almost exactly what I call it. I use it late in the season because it can cover a lot of bases with one exercise. Although not an exercise you can heavily load, it provides a training stimulus for the chest, triceps, lats, and anterior core in one exercise. Later in the year I look to minimize the frequency of using heavy-hitter exercises (squats and heavy pressing especially) and start adding in exercises that can be done to provide enough stimulus to maintain strength without overly fatiguing.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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