Release Points in Blocks

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #17135

    Release point (departure angle) is a topic of debate because many coaches teach or instruct different methods of starting. The pollution of the one leg start idea from a combine experts can ruined timing of knee drive with many athletes. If one spends too much time on the front block early, the athlete may depart too late causing a skating out effect because the angle is too low and most athletes

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    COV-GOD on #103444

    could you clarify what you mean by the ‘double leg’ start. What this entails and how this would held the ‘strong’ anthlete who cant start that well?

    I have an athlete who can lift all day but starts like a bus

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #103454

    The jump into HJ mats is underrated, but doing it only in isolation may not work. I wish I had force sensors on blocks because some pedals sound noisy (false power signal) but I look at slow motion on the pedals.

    When the athlete can keep the torso erect enough to not stumble out work on timing the lead arm pulling back.

    After that is the lifitng of the spine (stronger athletes can cheat with less spinal roundness) as the front leg opens up. Remember even the best will do things that break the rules.

    Compare vertical jumps between CMJ (counter movement jump) and SJ (static Squat jump).

    Also look if a rolling start helps. If rolling starts look good check the rear leg contribution. the Rear leg should get about 10 degrees of motion to get the front leg rolling into acceleration. It’s a double leg jump in initiation but it’s a staggered spike of forces when you see the data from the biomechanics.

    This stuff is hard and I am trying to get improvements faster than a few years. Sometimes sufficient strength trumps the technique at early phases…I just don’t know.

    Some great coaches just lurk on this message board so post video if you can. If you put it in HD on youtube I can download it and do a full breakdown and let the numbers speak for themselves.

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    Chad Williams on #103456

    Also look if a rolling start helps. If rolling starts look good check the rear leg contribution. the Rear leg should get about 10 degrees of motion to get the front leg rolling into acceleration. It’s a double leg jump in initiation but it’s a staggered spike of forces when you see the data from the biomechanics.

    I had a lot of success in enhancing the starting mechanics of women by cueing the push of the back leg and teaching how to load it sufficiently. Reinforcement was constant, during tempo, warm-up accelerations and they eventually got the picture to focus on the rear.

    Also, check the weight distribution in the blocks, weaker athletes will need to “sit back” for a higher release angle.

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    SAT10 on #103615

    I have a few starts from one training session posted here: https://elitetrack.com/forums/viewthread/9582/

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