Race Distribution

Posted In: Sprints

  • Avatar
    Participant
    utfootball4 on #15604

    Mike whats your thoughts about holding back in the 100m race.

    Avatar
    Participant
    utfootball4 on #81183

    [quote author="utfootball4" date="1239090617"]Mike whats your thoughts about holding back in the 100m race.

    Holding back effort?

    Never really had an athlete do it…at least not fully distributed over the course of the run during the early season. We’ve done it in round formats but that isn’t typically an evenly distributed effort governor…more like ‘just stay in the lead (or 2nd, 3rd, whatever qualifies).’[/quote]

    So do you instruct your athletes to run the 100 “all out” or delayed acc according to John smith?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #81186

    We don’t delay body angles in quite the same way that Smith does..I’ve had some athletes distribute the effort a little over 100m but most I’ve worked maybe aren’t advanced enough to do it (or I don’t make my intentions clear). I don’t really believe in the 80% effort through 30m nonsense though. The most someone can throttle back is like 1-3% so someone has to be very in tune to their engine and trust the clutch to be able to pull it off.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Avatar
    Participant
    utfootball4 on #81189

    Charlie’s description of running a 100m race to me was simple: flick the wrist and pump the arms.

    The reference to acceleration patterns I think has more training applications, e.g., flying sprints. If you do say a 20m flying sprint with a 50m lead in (total 70m), it’s really a 60m sprint with an extra 10m to get started so you’re not expending as much effort to overcome inertia. Hopefully, this will allow you to conserve energy at the beginning that can be applied later in the run to reach a higher max velocity than if you burned all out from the start. However, this does not necessarily result in a faster overall time for the run. In a race, Charlie always advised his sprinters to go all out from the start. That’s in Speed Trap as well.The point of my original post is that once you start to decelerate, don’t fight it. The very top guys can run to the end with little deceleration, but that’s a conditioning question. If for whatever reason you don’t have enough speed/conditioning to avoid deceleration there’s nothing you can do to stop it. You can only make it worse.

    As far as acceleration training is concerned, it’s also a relaxation issue. Those “submaximal” starts you’re referring to are probably faster than your “maximal” starts. As a general rule, you usually run your fastest when you think you’re only going 90%. If you push the acceleration too hard, it causes you to tighten up. There’s a slight delay between when you apply effort and when you feel it get translated to the track. It’s only a fraction of a second but it seems much longer. A mistake many runners make is to keep pushing when they don’t feel instantaneous power.

    lkh: JS
    Oh, yes, you can do something to minimize deceleration. You can keep your head down and accelerate longer, so there’s less time to slow down–and that’s what the people at the top of the sport are doing. Bolt DID run 6.32 for 60 but 30-60 slower than Ben despite a higher top speed…and you do that by keeping your head down and accelerating longer. You can’t argue against this: It’s there in black and white in the splits! There is also a conditioning issue…and a power issue, but there IS a race modeling issue.

    Avatar
    Participant
    trackspeedboy on #81191

    I think keeping your head down longer and coming up very slowly helps A LOT, it also helps me to keep relaxed when i come upright.

    Avatar
    Participant
    Novice on #81207

    The purpose of this post is to encourage a discussion on race distribution. While the concept is easy to discern in the 400m and 200m I would argue that race distribution has significant implications on performance in the 100m dash.

    My understand of the concept as it applies to the 100m is that you have to be patient through all phases of the race which is very different from holding back. Typically, this error is made in the acceleration phase where range of motion in the swinging segments and force application is compromised at the expense of frequency.

    Avatar
    Participant
    sizerp on #81213

    Charlie’s description of running a 100m race to me was simple: flick the wrist and pump the arms.

    Do you know what he means by “flick the wrist”?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #81236

    Do you know what he means by “flick the wrist”?

    It is his cue for the action of the lead arm on block clearance.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #81237

    Charlie’s description of running a 100m race to me was simple: flick the wrist and pump the arms.

    The reference to acceleration patterns I think has more training applications, e.g., flying sprints. If you do say a 20m flying sprint with a 50m lead in (total 70m), it’s really a 60m sprint with an extra 10m to get started so you’re not expending as much effort to overcome inertia. Hopefully, this will allow you to conserve energy at the beginning that can be applied later in the run to reach a higher max velocity than if you burned all out from the start. However, this does not necessarily result in a faster overall time for the run. In a race, [b]Charlie always advised his sprinters to go all out from the start.[/b] That’s in Speed Trap as well.The point of my original post is that once you start to decelerate, don’t fight it. The very top guys can run to the end with little deceleration, but that’s a conditioning question. If for whatever reason you don’t have enough speed/conditioning to avoid deceleration there’s nothing you can do to stop it. You can only make it worse.

    As far as acceleration training is concerned, it’s also a relaxation issue. Those “submaximal” starts you’re referring to are probably faster than your “maximal” starts. As a general rule, you usually run your fastest when you think you’re only going 90%. If you push the acceleration too hard, it causes you to tighten up. There’s a slight delay between when you apply effort and when you feel it get translated to the track. It’s only a fraction of a second but it seems much longer. A mistake many runners make is to keep pushing when they don’t feel instantaneous power.

    lkh: JS
    Oh, yes, you can do something to minimize deceleration. You can keep your head down and accelerate longer, so there’s less time to slow down–and that’s what the people at the top of the sport are doing. Bolt DID run 6.32 for 60 but 30-60 slower than Ben despite a higher top speed…and you do that by keeping your head down and accelerating longer. You can’t argue against this: It’s there in black and white in the splits! There is also a conditioning issue…and a power issue, but there IS a race modeling issue.

    Was this entire post a quote from Charlie? I couldn’t tell if it was all the same person or not?

    Question…how can we say that the head down causes the longer acceleration phase and not conditioning or merely a change in philosophy from the 80s where ‘get up and run’ was a very prominent philosophy.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Avatar
    Participant
    premium on #81244

    i think conditioning as the season goes on helps one learn to and physically be able to maintain acceleration longer…i believe in a HSI video i saw an athlete walking up stairs with a similar body position to bieng in the drivephase and he commented on how greene was able walk up the stairs for more steps than him leading to greene bieng able to stay low/accelerate longer

    Avatar
    Participant
    Novice on #81273

    Aside from coach Francis there are also reputable coaches such as Vince Anderson who argue that you can never push hard enough…see his ncaa coaching convention presentation December 2008. I tend to agree with him because limit the extention limit the elastic response of the hip flexor which is very important for recovery mechanics.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.