Old thread: HJ workout and tips

Posted In: Jumps

  • Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #8301

    posted on 1-10-2003 at 03:36 AM by daa20

    I have been high jumping for 5 seasons now (winter and spring 9th and 10 grade and winter 11th) and I was wondering if there is anyone who has tips on any aspect of the event with the exception of the approach. If anyone has good workouts that really build on the pre-existing skills please reply to this and if you have alot of them just email me at Daa96@netscape.net. Thanks.

    -David
    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-11-2003 at 05:02 PM by mike

    First of all, I wanted to say that running the approach correctly is about 70% of the high jump. The approach is quite technical in the HJ but if run correctly it sets up everything at takeoff and flight. It’s not unusual for elite level high jumpers to spend most of their technical training time on approch work.

    But since you asked for non-approach stuff, here’s some pointers:

    1. Don’t run anything long (maximum 350m) or slow. You are a power athlete and need to train like one.

    2. Bounding and plyometrics can be very very beneficial for high jumpers.

    3. All jumping exercises offer an opportunity to work on takeoff mechanics in some way. That is, with every jumping exercise you can work on learning to apply force with your hips as opposed to your toe, you can work on arm swing mechanics, posture, free leg swing, flat footed or heel-to-toe takeoff mechanics, placement of foot contact, etc. These are all important but often under-coached issues that can be very helpful.

    4. Emphasize vertical force in most of your jumps. Every jumping exercise can be done with a different emphasis but you should be emphasizing vertical force application. This will mean that you’ll be pushing down harder rather than back, and you’ll be jumping higher rather than farther.

    As for a really general and basic workout plan, I think at your level you might want to do something like this:

    Monday:
    -Dynamic Warmup
    -Flexibility and mobility work
    -Acceleration development (sprints of <30m)
    -Plyos
    -Weight lift (olympic lifting, squats, etc.)

    Tuesday:
    -Dynamic Warmup
    -Flexibility and mobility work
    -Technical train
    -General strength development (medicine ball, body weight exercises, etc.)

    Wednesday:
    -Dynamic Warmup
    -Flexibility and mobility work
    -Approach work
    -Speed development (flying 30s)
    -Weight lift (like Monday)

    Thursday:
    like Tuesday

    Friday:
    -Dynamic Warmup
    -Flexibility and mobility work
    -Speed development (flying 30s)
    -Plyos
    -Weight lift (like Monday)

    Saturday:
    -Dynamic Warmup
    -Flexibility and mobility work
    -Speed endurance (i.e- 6 x 200m)
    -General strength development

    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-11-2003 at 05:32 PM by daa20

    Thank you for the work out plan, I will attempt to follow it as much as possible mainly because we dont take out the mats that much during the winter or spring season so its hard to work on some of these things. I asked for nothing on an approach because I feel that it is something that I do very consistantly and dont have many problems with. If you do fell that there is anything specific in the approach that most people need work on then you can post anything on that. Once agian, Thank You.

    -David

    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-13-2003 at 06:13 AM by mike

    There are several key points to the high jump approach but the most important of these is outward foot pressure on the curve of the run. Outward foot pressure is what establishes the lean and ensures that the lean is coming from the ground and not simply from bending sideways at the trunk. A correct lean establishes the centripetal forces which will, at takeoff, assist in the rotation up and over the
    bar.

    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-27-2003 at 08:26 PM by daa20

    Are workouts on trampolines any good for High Jumpers at the High School level or should i stay away from that? I am asking because multiple times I have jumped around on my trampoline a few days before a meet and for some reason I seem to do better when I jump on it.

    Thank you for listening to my questions.

    -David

    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-27-2003 at 09:29 PM by Mike

    I've noticed a similar thing jumping on the high jump mat. I don't think it would really be all that good for you but I think it might have that effect because it allows a plyometric-type workout without overly taxing the neuromuscular system due to the increased shock absorbancy of the mat / trampoline.

    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-28-2003 at 03:21 AM by daa20

    Do you think that a workout on the trampoline or mats would have the same effect on long and triple jumpers?

    -David
    ===========================================================

    posted on 1-28-2003 at 04:01 PM by mike

    I think so. I'd imagine you wouldn't really want to use it as a training device too often though because it really slows down the amortization phase of jumping and somewhat reduces the plyometric effect of jumping exercises. It is much easier on the legs though and reduces the pounding that the legs take from landing on a hard surface dramatically. I think this might be why it would be beneficial, especially if you've got jumpers who need a workout but have dead or tired legs.

    ELITETRACK Founder

Viewing 1 post (of 1 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.