More Praise for Freelap Track and Field

Posted In: Blog Discussion

  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #17885

    I normally don’t do reviews unless a product is very good. I am frankly tired of the excuses of people talking about speed constantly but never test it? Timing is key and doing it solo is hard, but in team environments is very hard to gather timing and splits on a bunch of athletes if everyone is doing different workouts or running head to head, when doing starts for example. We have to be admin

    Continue reading…

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    W.E. Price on #111247

    I agree regarding the Brower system. I do like the simplicity and accuracy that Freelap advertises. Though with the investment I’ve made with the former, perhaps another year.

    I generally don’t have a problem with central timing. In fact I prefer it since I have a process where data reduction is involved from recording to various application analyses and repository.

    And I do like the starting options that the Brower provides. Can Freelap configure similar to an FAT system from start to finish?

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    Kebba Tolbert on #111248

    Please explain how Brower is outdated? You’ll have a hard time convincing me of that…

    Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #111259

    Kebba,

    If you don’t time frequently I guess it doesn’t matter. Brower is fine for testing, but some coaches time every day. If you share a weekly form of what you collect it may clarify your perspective.

    Some people have produced medalists with a stopwatch so timing is not the only thing that matters….

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    Dylan Hicks on #111261

    Have to reinforce what Carl has said. My group bought a freelap system. The ease of setting up and accuracy of timing is great. Very easy to use as the athlete, and helps reinforce hand held times for the coach/athlete. We are using it for time trial tonight. We are doing 2 x 60m reps, start from touch pad, with gate at 30 and 60, then 1 x 120 from touch pad , with gates at 40, 80, 100, 120. Two flying 40 splits and two flying 20 splits late in rep.

    WE Price. Add a conservative 0.2 to a run from the touchpad to account for RT.

    Enjoy!

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    Josh Hurlebaus on #111262

    I’ve used brower for testing before and it was great. I’ve also used it for workouts but when batteries die, and set up became a pain it added 30 min to my workouts. Not ideal but not a problem if you have a coach.

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    W.E. Price on #111266

    …WE Price. Add a conservative 0.2 to a run from the touchpad to account for RT.

    Enjoy!

    Appreciate the reply. However, since we measure RT as well as block clearance in our start-through sessions, adding a time in that way is unacceptable. Other than ReacTime I like what Brower offers for a complete recording of the session.

    I do agree somewhat with what Josh stated regarding cell power replacement. Although, with battery replenishment and test, the interruption time this week was less than ten minutes. I’ve also found that in my practice area certain environmental factors can cause misreadings at times.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #111269

    The question really is what are you measuring and how precise that information needs to be. Splits are broken time and length segments that really help with track and field.

    The power of free lap is that the coach is collecting new and precious data. IF you want a start and release (first movement) you can do that. Reaction time is based on a sound stimulus and that is full automatic timing.

    Also what about group timing? What about time segments? Price makes things very hard especially with hurdling. What about multiple people hurdling for cycle splits? Every single time I hear people say “we do this” I visit and it’s a organized riot in practice (as Charlie use to say) and I see limits. For the same set-up.

    Freelap has changed hurdling as tough towns are estimated or broken down by hand by video. Who does this with 500 touch downs? That takes hours each day and you a kidding us to believe that it’s being done.

    Brower and Freelap will need to evolve further, as I believe that the next generation of Freelap will make brewer obsolete because of price point and modification of the data collection. I am not predicting….well not saying it’s going tomorrow to be on a tablet, but you see the direction the technology is going thanks to the late Steve Jobs.

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    W.E. Price on #111298

    …Also what about group timing? What about time segments? [b]Price makes things very hard especially with hurdling[/b]. What about multiple people hurdling for cycle splits? Every single time I hear people say “we do this” I visit and it’s a organized riot in practice (as Charlie use to say) and I see limits. For the same set-up…

    In the oft chance that you’re referring to me here, I’m not aware of any issues regarding my group’s session recordings. Though my group size is presently at four I’m still able to spread out on occasion at different areas of the track and accomplish acceptable data recording/reduction processes centrally. No chaos here!

    Though as I’ve mentioned the Brower does experience some misreads during near extreme environmental conditions. The Fusion Sports system seems to cover the central timing aspect that I’d be interested in. However $8k+ is pretty steep with my program budget.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #111318

    I was talking about Price being cost not your last name…sorry for the confusion.

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    Christopher Glaeser on #111282

    I was a long time and satisfied user of Brower with $3,500 of timing equipment. When I purchased a Freelap system a little over a year ago, I retired my Brower (this was before I had any affiliation with Freelap). As Carl has noted, Freelap is a game changer. The two most compelling features for me were the ease of setup and the ability to time multiple athletes simultaneously. With years of Brower experience I can set it up in a relatively modest amount of time, but with Freelap, I can set up a 20 meter fly in the time I can walk 20 meters. We had been using the Brower for periodic testing; the Freelap was so small and so easy to set up, we began using it regularly in our training. Add to that the ability to time multiple lanes and mix and match the transmitters to add lanes and/or add splits (which are 1/4 the cost of a Brower split), and yes, it was a game changer.

    I first learned about Freelap reading a thread by Ken Jakalski. Ken has also moved from photocell to Freelap and he discusses why in his article My Evolution to Freelap

    Best,
    Christopher

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    Christopher Glaeser on #118085

    Can Freelap configure similar to an FAT system from start to finish?

    Not sure why I didn’t think of this solution before …

    The watches emit an audible tone when triggered, so yes, Freelap can be configured similar to an FAT system. A coach can use one of the transmitters (e.g. release the button on a TX Touch or turn on a TX Junior or TX 5-10-5) while standing near the athlete(s) in the blocks. When the watch(es) are triggered, it will simultaneously emit a tone and start the timing.

    Best,
    Christopher

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    sizerp on #118086

    It says on their website that the minimum interval they measure is 1 second. How do you measure top speed for an athlete that moves faster than 10 m/s?

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    Christopher Glaeser on #118088

    It says on their website that the minimum interval they measure is 1 second. How do you measure top speed for an athlete that moves faster than 10 m/s?

    Thanks for asking; I updated the reference.

    About 18 months ago Brooks Johnson contacted me and said he wanted to use Freelap to measure Gatlin’s 10 meter splits and Oliver’s hurdle splits (Gatlin was training at the ESPN facility at the time). The manufacturer developed a new watch about a year ago with a minimum split time of 0.78 seconds, which is sufficient to get both 10 meter spits and hurdle splits (with sufficient margin so that hurdles can be lowered and moved closer).

    Dennis Mitchell and Star Athletics began using Freelap when Gatlin moved to Clermont. Mitchell discussed his use of Freelap when at the US Olympic Trials here.

    Best,
    Christopher

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