More flexible + Greater range of movement = Greater Stride Length

Posted In: Flexibility

  • Mike Young
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    Mike Young on #102641

    Watch for how the athlete moves. If they can hit desired positions of flexion, extension, etc without loss of posture they likely have adequate mobility and joint ROM.

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #107443

    Unger voiced his complaints about the Jamaican sprinter to BILD sport, saying: [b]“Bolt didn’t even warm up for the semi final. He showed up in shorts and jogging shoes, did his pickups and practice starts, put on his spikes and then ran the 100m in 9.92 seconds.[/b]

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    burkhalter on #107444

    [quote]Unger voiced his complaints about the Jamaican sprinter to BILD sport, saying: [b]“Bolt didn’t even warm up for the semi final. He showed up in shorts and jogging shoes, did his pickups and practice starts, put on his spikes and then ran the 100m in 9.92 seconds.[/b]

    [/quote]

    Link?

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #107445

    [quote author="JC Cooper" date="1303196992"][quote]Unger voiced his complaints about the Jamaican sprinter to BILD sport, saying: [b]“Bolt didn’t even warm up for the semi final. He showed up in shorts and jogging shoes, did his pickups and practice starts, put on his spikes and then ran the 100m in 9.92 seconds.[/b]

    [/quote]

    Link?[/quote]

    Original Link: https://grg51.typepad.com/steroid_nation/2008/08/german-olympic.html

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #109023

    Length Tension Curve.

    Original Link: https://www.pt.ntu.edu.tw/hmchai/hGlossary/LengthTensionCurve.htm

    At shortened lengths: active contraction dominates force generation.
    Just beyond its resting length: passive tension begins to contribute and active tension is compromised.
    At more elongated lengths: passive tension accounts for most of the total force.

     

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    JeremyRichmond on #109037

    [b]Length Tension Curve.[/b]

    Original Link: https://www.pt.ntu.edu.tw/hmchai/hGlossary/LengthTensionCurve.htm

    At shortened lengths: active contraction dominates force generation.
    Just beyond its resting length: passive tension begins to contribute and active tension is compromised.
    At more elongated lengths: passive tension accounts for most of the total force.
     

    The graph is s perfect depiction of why passive tension is not a significant contributor at top speed running. At maximal speeds, the force production times approach the limit of human muscle contraction time so there is barely enough time to achieve peak tension in the whole muscle. When the muscle does activate it is better to have considerable overlap of cross bridges which implies that operating at the extreme ranges of joint movement would penalise force production. Stiffness at maximal speeds is due to muscle contraction not tendons. Still good tendons help transfer force production to the bones and whilst tendon ‘hypertrophy’ may seem like a strategy to facilitate this, in reality the tendon is strong enough and more importance should be placed to the alignment of tendon fibers which requires good recovery time and recovery/repair techniques.

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #109042

    The graph is s perfect depiction of why passive tension is not a significant contributor at top speed running. At maximal speeds, the force production times approach the limit of human muscle contraction time so there is barely enough time to achieve peak tension in the whole muscle. When the muscle does activate it is better to have considerable overlap of cross bridges which implies that operating at the extreme ranges of joint movement would penalise force production. Stiffness at maximal speeds is due to muscle contraction not tendons. Still good tendons help transfer force production to the bones and whilst tendon ‘hypertrophy’ may seem like a strategy to facilitate this, in reality the tendon is strong enough and more importance should be placed to the alignment of tendon fibers which requires good recovery time and recovery/repair techniques.

    How would you conclude?, that increased flexibility (being very flexible) is beneficial to performance or vice-versa?.

    I’m on another forum, this is what one member said with regards to my training: For those who don’t understand the length / tension relationships of muscles I’d refer you to the work of Janda. I’ll quickly precis some of it for you: you need to focus on muscle length not strength. Further, it’s a system of inter-connections and there is no such thing as a free lunch.

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    JeremyRichmond on #109048

    [quote author="Jeremy Richmond" date="1310186532"]The graph is s perfect depiction of why passive tension is not a significant contributor at top speed running. At maximal speeds, the force production times approach the limit of human muscle contraction time so there is barely enough time to achieve peak tension in the whole muscle. When the muscle does activate it is better to have considerable overlap of cross bridges which implies that operating at the extreme ranges of joint movement would penalise force production. Stiffness at maximal speeds is due to muscle contraction not tendons. Still good tendons help transfer force production to the bones and whilst tendon ‘hypertrophy’ may seem like a strategy to facilitate this, in reality the tendon is strong enough and more importance should be placed to the alignment of tendon fibers which requires good recovery time and recovery/repair techniques.

    How would you conclude?, that increased flexibility (being very flexible) is beneficial to performance or vice-versa?.

    I’m on another forum, this is what one member said with regards to my training: For those who don’t understand the length / tension relationships of muscles I’d refer you to the work of Janda. I’ll quickly precis some of it for you: you need to focus on muscle length not strength. Further, it’s a system of inter-connections and there is no such thing as a free lunch.

    Bolt does dedicate to stretching, (as does everyone else). The question is, how flexible do people believe he really is?. I always associate flexibility with elasticity.[/quote]

    With all due respect Janda did say lots but didn’t prove much. However I do appreciate his theories on back pain as they have allowed with further lateral thinking for solutions to be found. In terms of muscle interconnections its comparatively simple in sprinting.

    Firstly stretching to loosen tight muscles (or likely connective tissue surrounding the muscle belly) and stretching to loosen intertwined tendon fibils is essential for good performance. Stretching to increase flexibility is almost pointless unless one has too little flexibility. Basically the premise is that one needs to have overlapping crossbridges which means one has to operate inside the limits of their range of movement. Further one should have a stiff stretch reflex which is like a natural spring; Asafa can be seen to kick his leg into extension (although not to complete extension) thus inducing the stretch reflex which pulls the leg into flexion about the knee thereby helping to generate horizontal force/velocity. The quicker one kicks the leg into extension the greater the stretch relfex response.[That’s the extent of interconnection part of sprinting]

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