Looking for Ghosts – Screening for Postural Dysfunction

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  • Vern Gambetta
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    Vern Gambetta on #14869

    A good athletic profile or screening will serve a guide for what you need to do next. I do not think an athletic profile, especially done by a coach should go searching for dysfunctions or malfunctions. Remember each sport has adaptive postural response. The longer an athlete participates in a particular sport, especially if it is one side dominant, the more evident the response will be. (An examp

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    BLogaN on #72495

    Interesting… my chiropractor kept telling me that I have an overdeveloped lower back, so I dropped heavy deadlifts from my training and replaced them with more single-leg work and front squats…

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #72497

    Totally agree with this post. I’ve personally had to deal with an athlete who was told they needed to address all kinds of ‘problems’ that was preventing them from performing despite the fact that they were already running PRs an competing at a world class level. When using such ‘treatments’ you have to look at both the total plan (namely how much time you have to address the problem and still be ready to compete), whether the ‘impairment’ is something that is merely cosmetic or is something that is actually seriously impairing performance, and how best to address the issue without disrupting the training that is actually focused on preparing the athlete for competitive fitness.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #72508

    Truly a great post.

    One of the biggest benefits to going after “dysfunction” or “problems” is that it creates a need for your services. All athletes want to improve and if you identify a “weakness” and how your services can correct it, more often than not they’ll sign on.

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    JeremyRichmond on #72524

    Totally agree with this post. I’ve personally had to deal with an athlete who was told they needed to address all kinds of ‘problems’ that was preventing them from performing despite the fact that they were already running PRs an competing at a world class level. When using such ‘treatments’ you have to look at both the total plan (namely how much time you have to address the problem and still be ready to compete), whether the ‘impairment’ is something that is merely cosmetic or is something that is actually seriously impairing performance, and how best to address the issue without disrupting the training that is actually focused on preparing the athlete for competitive fitness.

    Well there is some truth to correcting imbalances although I dare to say they may not necessarity be seen posturally. Imbalances around the 33 vertebrae of the spine can make a difference to performance. Renkawitz et al. (2006) found an association between imbalance of the erector spinae and the occurence of lower back pain in tennis players which could certainly affect their ability to train with quality. I’ve no doubt the same can be said of athletes although a good massage will go a long way to address any effect of these ‘dysfunctions’. Certainly, a balanced body workout will also address this issue. However to sacrifice a lot of time from strength, plyometric, sprint, (assisted jump etc) to fix this issue is probably not warranted except for the tennis player or golfer. So if you want to reduce your handicap…

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    Chad Williams on #72525

    Boo talked briefly about this topic at our level two. He said something to the effect about designing a well-balanced program and the body will take what it needs to find homestasis.

    BTW – I hate the term prehab which is becoming common amongst the S&C;world now.

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    mortac8 on #72526

    Boo talked briefly about this topic at our level two. He said something to the effect about designing a well-balanced program and the body will take what it needs to find homestasis.

    That’s nice to say but it’s only valid up to a certain point. It’s not like you’re going to train in such a well-balanced program that you will have no need for therapy.

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    Gabe Sanders on #72528

    First and foremost, hello everyone. This my first post as a member of the site and I’ve loved it since it’s inception. Little ashamed it took me this long to join in. Anyway…

    The timing of this blog is perfect with an athlete of mine whom I’ll be working with starting this year. He has two “imbalances/imperfections” that have stuck with him both recently and his whole life. First, in his senior year of high school he had shoulder surgery to repair damage done from a seperation. Secondly, he is what you could call, a “toe-walker”. He naturally has a very tight set up in both his achilles tendons and literally cannot/does not walk heel-toe or have any active dorsiflected action when running unless consiously and actively cueing it. He’s told me that both doctors and recent coaches have even said to him they literally don’t understand why he’s run as fast as he has.

    A red flag went up when discussing his training regiment in his freshmen year a lot of his strength and condition went towards tryiing to “fix” these two problems. My red flag went up when I found out he was dealing with these problems his senior year of high school and ran 47.30, while during his freshmen year he was a full second behind, along with a hamstring pull. He came out of a very good canadian system that in his descripton had a very good wholistic approach to training where as too much attention was given to these ‘defifiences’ this past season.

    I think I’ll be scheduling a sit down with our strength coach now to start the year, heh. As it’s been mentioned, too many times in these cases, an analogy I use is one can focus too long on a small piece of the puzzle is instead of taking a step back and creating a clear image of the whole picture. Even if you figure out where you think that piece goes, if you stop there and are satisfied, you’re just gonna end up with a puzzle picture of just half a barn, hahaha.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #72534

    [quote author="Mike Young" date="1221870069"]Totally agree with this post. I’ve personally had to deal with an athlete who was told they needed to address all kinds of ‘problems’ that was preventing them from performing despite the fact that they were already running PRs an competing at a world class level. When using such ‘treatments’ you have to look at both the total plan (namely how much time you have to address the problem and still be ready to compete), whether the ‘impairment’ is something that is merely cosmetic or is something that is actually seriously impairing performance, and how best to address the issue without disrupting the training that is actually focused on preparing the athlete for competitive fitness.

    Well there is some truth to correcting imbalances although I dare to say they may not necessarity be seen posturally. Imbalances around the 33 vertebrae of the spine can make a difference to performance. Renkawitz et al. (2006) found an association between imbalance of the erector spinae and the occurence of lower back pain in tennis players which could certainly affect their ability to train with quality. I’ve no doubt the same can be said of athletes although a good massage will go a long way to address any effect of these ‘dysfunctions’. Certainly, a balanced body workout will also address this issue. However to sacrifice a lot of time from strength, plyometric, sprint, (assisted jump etc) to fix this issue is probably not warranted except for the tennis player or golfer. So if you want to reduce your handicap…[/quote]

    Do they go into any detail about this imbalance?

    Are they saying those who don’t devote time to getting their backs really strong will be more likely to have back problems? Kind of a no brainer isn’t it?

    What is assisted jump?

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    JeremyRichmond on #72535

    [quote author="Jeremy Richmond" date="1221895332"][quote author="Mike Young" date="1221870069"]Totally agree with this post. I’ve personally had to deal with an athlete who was told they needed to address all kinds of ‘problems’ that was preventing them from performing despite the fact that they were already running PRs an competing at a world class level. When using such ‘treatments’ you have to look at both the total plan (namely how much time you have to address the problem and still be ready to compete), whether the ‘impairment’ is something that is merely cosmetic or is something that is actually seriously impairing performance, and how best to address the issue without disrupting the training that is actually focused on preparing the athlete for competitive fitness.

    Well there is some truth to correcting imbalances although I dare to say they may not necessarity be seen posturally. Imbalances around the 33 vertebrae of the spine can make a difference to performance. Renkawitz et al. (2006) found an association between imbalance of the erector spinae and the occurence of lower back pain in tennis players which could certainly affect their ability to train with quality. I’ve no doubt the same can be said of athletes although a good massage will go a long way to address any effect of these ‘dysfunctions’. Certainly, a balanced body workout will also address this issue. However to sacrifice a lot of time from strength, plyometric, sprint, (assisted jump etc) to fix this issue is probably not warranted except for the tennis player or golfer. So if you want to reduce your handicap…[/quote]

    Do they go into any detail about this imbalance?

    Are they saying those who don’t devote time to getting their backs really strong will be more likely to have back problems? Kind of a no brainer isn’t it?

    What is assisted jump?[/quote]

    Its more to do with muscle recruitment patterns between one side of the back and the other. Improving back muscle strength isn’t the answer in this case. A simple strength stabilization coordination and stretching program was prescribed as a result of the study. The program is not much different to any balanced program that is around. The muscle recruitment imbalances are more to do with the one-sidedness of the sports. In track and field anyone that runs a bend is subject to slight one-sidedness but it is more likely to be a factor for Javelin, discus, and high jump to a lesser extent.

    Increasing back strength isn’t more likely to prevent back problems. There are many reasons why back problems occur but increasing back muscle endurance is looking like the best general method around but don’t quote me.

    As for assisted jumps…it was discussed in a previous thread but has to do with a partner assisting you in squat jumps. I brought it up more as a point of humour. Stick to normal training programs for now as per the recommendations of the many experts belonging to this website.

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    Chad Williams on #72536

    [quote author="Chad Williams" date="1221897284"]Boo talked briefly about this topic at our level two. He said something to the effect about designing a well-balanced program and the body will take what it needs to find homestasis.

    That’s nice to say but it’s only valid up to a certain point. It’s not like you’re going to train in such a well-balanced program that you will have no need for therapy.[/quote]

    Agreed. His point was to include a variety of exercises and you will limit the onset of imbalances. He meant be proactive not reactive when it is too late.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #72545

    Many people not familiar with balanced biomotor training look at much of the seemingly unspecific work and think that it’s a waste of time. Little do they recognize though that it’s much of that work that helps to self-correct many issues and provide the glue that holds together the chasis once the engine gets powerful.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #72546

    Just wanted to add that Boo (and I) are very much aware of the need for therapy when necessary both before, during and after injuries. The point I was trying to make is basically just that too many people get too caught up with fixing the chasis and not enough time with building the engine. And as Mr Glove pointed out…pointing out dysfunction makes for a perfect sales pitch.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    mortac8 on #72561

    Pointing out dysfunction…where I’m from it’s “you have winged scapulae.”

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #72656

    Many people not familiar with balanced biomotor training look at much of the seemingly unspecific work and think that it’s a waste of time. Little do they recognize though that it’s much of that work that helps to self-correct many issues and provide the glue that holds together the chasis once the engine gets powerful.

    This is true.

    Look at those selling corrective exercises. Many of them are the banes to their antidote.

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