Las Vegas

Posted In: Dan Pfaff

      • Avatar
        Participant
        davan on #12087

        Mike–
        Are you or anybody else going to make some quick notes from Vegas for us to see? It would be greatly appreciated as I hear he went into much depth about his training, moreso than he has in the past, and presented some scientific literature on some of his high set/low rep oly protocols.

      • Avatar
        Participant
        davan on #55825

        bump for mike

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #55826

        This is not mine. It's an abstract of his presentation at NACACTFCA. He gave the same exact presentation at Vegas…

        Developing Biomotor Qualities to Enhance Short Sprint Finishes – Dan Pfaff (USA) spoke on Speed Endurance in the short sprints and specifically focused on the need for endurance in multiple rounds in major national and world championships where a sprinter may run four rounds over two days.  With respect to this, Pfaff noted the benefit of the American school and collegiate system which stresses scoring and relays, leading to long-term development of endurance through many rounds and events from the time sprinters are 14 years of age!

        A topic of much concern to all sprint coaches is the ability of their athlete to maintain form and minimize the rate of deceleration during the last third of the race in question. Factors which influence this section of the race model range from distribution of biochemical substrates to elastic-power endurance parameters. The variables and their influence upon one another is a complex web of science, skill and solid train theory.

        The core of any training plan is that of improving the athleteâ??s physiological state of readiness. Many forms of training exist in that sense but a synthesis of methods will lead one to a classification scheme of basic biomotor qualities. While not downplaying the scope of strategy or psychological skills, this lecture will be centered towards training and physiological factors in the main.

         Stimulus
         Adaptation Responses
         Stabilization
         Actualization

        Americans do first two very well – stimulus and adaptation response â?? but forget the last two!  Coaches donâ??t stabilize enough after adaptation, and the injury factor goes way up as a result of too much of the first two!  Actualization is the key â?? can they reproduce it 80+% of the time and then do it in competition under any conditions?

        Pfaff also noted new research on short burst activity and applications for aerobic adaptation quality and even lactic acid tolerance.  A block start ladder â?? 4-5 x 10m, 20m, 30m, 40m – yields
        portable blood lactate values over 16mml. without running over 40 meters!  There is a more specific way to train lactate work and keep on the track for short sprint work!

        One of the most important points is that speed is a skill – sprinting and acceleration skills must be rehearsed over and over, and an athlete must have a new level of skill and speed and acceleration to which the coach then adds speed and special endurance instead of the athlete just enduring last yearâ??s speed and skill! Improper mechanics can lead to soft tissue overuse, and repetitive bad mechanics increase the potential damage with more volume and repetition.

        Proprioceptors must be developed â?? these are the organelles in the neuromuscular system that detect where we are in space and time! Nociceptors are nervous system receptors â?? when cortisol goes high, nociceptors go up and they feel the body more acutely. The ones that are super-wired really feel everything and may complain, but they are ready to run! Massage therapy affects all these systems and brings comfort. Therapy itself is a stressor, not necessarily a stress relief.  Therapy must be part of training and allow adaptation and stabilization.

        ELITETRACK Founder

      • Avatar
        Participant
        pzale8018 on #55827

        Pfaff also noted new research on short burst activity and applications for aerobic adaptation quality and even lactic acid tolerance.  A block start ladder â?? 4-5 x 10m, 20m, 30m, 40m – yields
        portable blood lactate values over 16mml. without running over 40 meters!  There is a more specific way to train lactate work and keep on the track for short sprint work!

        mike, do you know what study Dan was referring to?  I would very much like to read it for myself to see where this is coming from.  Please either post or forward this article if you can get your hands on it.

      • Avatar
        Participant
        Daniel Andrews on #55828

        Pfaff also noted new research on short burst activity and applications for aerobic adaptation quality and even lactic acid tolerance.  A block start ladder â?? 4-5 x 10m, 20m, 30m, 40m – yields
        portable blood lactate values over 16mml. without running over 40 meters!  There is a more specific way to train lactate work and keep on the track for short sprint work!

        As mentioned before in an earlier thread (https://elitetrack.com/index.php?option=com_smf&Itemid=94&topic=114.msg26942#msg26942) I believe this workout is very beneficial and a key in developing sprinters.  I believe Quik or JJ pointing out that the Italians used similiar work in 70's and 80's.   I learned this workout while in military in the early 90's from a former sprinter whose time in the military could have subjected to him to these italian influences in his training. 

        One concern that I have come by thru research is that the introduction of lactate work can interfere with the motor learning process.  Therefore before this workout should be done, the required skill set inventory for a sprinter should be near completely taught.   Meaning that acceleration mechanics should be above average before you ever use this type of workout.  Just by chance in my own coaching experiences I have had this workout come later in the season, now I can introduce it earlier to the athletes who have the skills to execute properly during it, and may even not introduce it to those that are beginners now that I have a better understanding.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #55829

        mike, do you know what study Dan was referring to?  I would very much like to read it for myself to see where this is coming from.  Please either post or forward this article if you can get your hands on it.

        I don't have them off-hand but I know I've seen several in Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research over the last 4 years which indicate these results.

        ELITETRACK Founder

      • Avatar
        Participant
        Kebba Tolbert on #55830

        J Appl Physiol â?¬ VOL 98 â?¬ JUNE 2005

        2. Burgomaster KA, Hughes SC, Heigenhauser GJF,
        Bradwell SN, and  Gibala MJ. Six sessions of sprint interval training
        increases muscle  oxidative potential and cycle endurance capacity in
        humans. J Appl  Physiol: 98: 1985­1990, 2005

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.