Jonathan Edwards Training Diary

Posted In: Jumps

  • Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #19101

    Thanks Lorien. A couple things really stand out:
    *very low training volume
    *seems to be somewhat haphazzard administration / distribution of speed and strength work
    *very little general / low intensity work (most of the work appears to be high intensity)
    *amazing how many back to back days off including one whole week off
    *amazing how few technical training days

    It's tough to really assess the worktouts without putting it in complete context (for example was he doing a 75 minute dynamic warmup routine before each session or a 5 minute jog) but it looks like his daily training could be finished in 15-60 minutes each day.

    Also, it would be interesting to know what 'circuits' consist of. They seem to appear on a fairly regular basis and depending on what it is it could fill in many of the question marks in his training program.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #19102

    14: 60m 6.34 â?? 60m 6.76 (4.00)(10.86mps) â?? 60m 7.02 (headwind)

    what was this 60m time (6.34 !!!!) ? ? ? ? im assuming he was using electronic timing but this cant be right…is it?

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    mortac8 on #19103

    14: 60m 6.34 â?? 60m 6.76 (4.00)(10.86mps) â?? 60m 7.02 (headwind)

    what was this 60m time (6.34 !!!!) ? ? ? ? im assuming he was using electronic timing but this cant be right…is it?

    It's all British propaganda :dance:

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #19104

    It's all British propaganda :dance:

    Great stuff….kinda like the Soviet disinformation program that was used in the 70s and 80s….12 hour training sessions, surgical muscle insertion changes, 800 lb squats by women, yada yada.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #19105

    i just copied and pasted it all to my coach…he was ONE of the people who coached him over like a 10 year period…he'll tell me if its all true…i asked him to tell me all his true maxes and PB's…i'll let you all know soon…

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #19106

    I was just joking. I'm pretty sure it's true. I've spoken with Mike Stone who worked with Edwards on his strength work and he confirmed the infrequency of lifting, the lack of variety in exercises, and the astounding PRs.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    saltojump5 on #19107

    lorien, thank you for posting. This is like opening a treasure chest. It's unbelievable how low his volume was. I'm wondering if this snapshot of his training was the culmination of a two year plan. Maybe a year and a half leading up to this time, he spent building and building, with much more volume. That way, he could come off of it across a whole span of six months, w/ largely high intensity and low volume, and hold together nicely. Any idea on how he went about things in 1994? Maybe he forewent any major peak then and just worked through? And then again, maybe it is a good indicator that some advanced jumpers, who recruit many motor units, and who have only one event to worry about, are better suited to not overdoing it w/ all the plyos and weights, and just keeping things simple when the time is right. He really appeared to have an Olympic weightlifter's type of plan, with high intensity on consecutive days, just not draining the CNS pool too much. It's so easy to give in to the temptation that more is better and that the best are always outworking us. This diary may help keep things in perspective. Thanks again! This is like gold to me. Amazing!   

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    lorien on #19108

    lorien, thank you for posting. This is like opening a treasure chest. It's unbelievable how low his volume was. I'm wondering if this snapshot of his training was the culmination of a two year plan. Maybe a year and a half leading up to this time, he spent building and building, with much more volume. That way, he could come off of it across a whole span of six months, w/ largely high intensity and low volume, and hold together nicely. Any idea on how he went about things in 1994? Maybe he forewent any major peak then and just worked through? And then again, maybe it is a good indicator that some advanced jumpers, who recruit many motor units, and who have only one event to worry about, are better suited to not overdoing it w/ all the plyos and weights, and just keeping things simple when the time is right. He really appeared to have an Olympic weightlifter's type of plan, with high intensity on consecutive days, just not draining the CNS pool too much. It's so easy to give in to the temptation that more is better and that the best are always outworking us. This diary may help keep things in perspective. Thanks again! This is like gold to me. Amazing!   

    Nice theory… but no!  :police: No culmination. Actually Jonathan had a very disappointing 1994 year due to a virus infection (Epstein-Barr/mononucleosis). I saw him compete in 1994 and he was really low in every respect. So, he struggled through 1994 and then decided to completely rest the whole fall. He started training in January (after 4 months off). His only goal was to get back to 1993 shape â?? obviously he surpassed that by far, perhaps a little bit by accident too.

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    saltojump5 on #19109

    Incredible! So what we see from February on is basically the whole of his training macrocycle (minus January) leading up to the summer competitions?!! That seems miraculous!

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    saltojump5 on #19110

    …just had to come back to this. This is a head trip!!!  :puzzled:  And what of periodization schemes??? A few yrs. ago, I would have told you his journal is junk. It kind of turns one's world view topsy turvy a little bit.  :shocked2:  It's like Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Am I missing something here?!! There's got to be more to his training than that. God be with him  :saint: God be with him  :saint:

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    lorien on #19111

    …just had to come back to this. This is a head trip!!!  :puzzled:  And what of periodization schemes??? A few yrs. ago, I would have told you his journal is junk. It kind of turns one's world view topsy turvy a little bit.  :shocked2:  It's like Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Am I missing something here?!! There's got to be more to his training than that. God be with him  :saint: God be with him  :saint:

    Well, there are many ways of looking at periodization. In Jonathanâ??s training, it appears progression through intensification is much more valued than progression through standard periodization entities (cycles). On the other hand, there wasnâ??t really that much time either â?? he had to get in shape by summer (5 months). Itâ??s interesting to note that intensification is taking place up till the best performance in triple jumping ever, without a traditional taper (although volume is drastically lowered). The last weeks before the 18.43w are really intense with many consecutive high intensity days in a row.

    The training regimen is obviously HIGHLY individualized. This is also a factor that comes up when discussing training with him. He is/was extremely logical about what he should/shouldnâ??t do. Itâ??s a minimalist approach for sure, and everything is valued against â??do I really need to do thatâ??, if not, or in doubt, then drop it. Thatâ??s how squats were eliminated from the program â?? he didnâ??t think he needed them anymore. Making the system as simple as possible, gives you more opportunities to really feel for what you are doing and where you are going. Thereâ??s no reliance on â??the next cycle will do this and that, hopefullyâ??. The fog that stands between the raw material and the end product is much thinner. Obviously it also becomes more important to really get a good FEEL for what you are doing and how you are progressing.

    For me, a few things really stand out:
    â?¢ Extremely careful progression in loads (in weight training). Iâ??m sure he could have lifted much higher loads in February-March already, yet he was very patient with getting into higher intensities.
    â?¢ Intensities in the weight room harmonize with other modalities (patience again); when weights go up, intensity in jumping does the same (hand-in-hand).
    â?¢ He is well prepared and adjusted for jumping with high speed; he is already in respectable lengths in March (16.60). Thatâ??s two months before first competition.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #19112

    Here's the actual pages of the diary for validation. Courtesy of Lorien…
    Jan-Feb
    March-April
    April-May
    June-July
    July-Aug

    And also a pdf article from his coach.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #19113

    Well, having spoken to my coach about the edwards training seen here…he told me that, firstly he was a one of a kind type athlete and he knew exactly what training was good for him. In 95 he was already 29 years old and from the ages 22-27 ish was when he did his plyometric work and high volume training…at 29, he didnt do a great deal, thus why his program seems a little strange…he was extremely gifted and knew exactly what he responded well too…i guess he did pretty well in his event…lol.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #19114

    The weight circuits described in the paper serve the role of low-intensity, higher-volume general work. They are pretty infrequent though.

    Another interesting thing about the program is his exclusive use of one heavy lift per day with no assistance exercises. I've done this before with good effect but I've found it gets hard to balance strength levels and also many athletes tend to get bored on such a program.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    cerebro on #19115

    what do you mean by balance strength levels mike

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