Internships, Mentorships, Apprenticeships

Posted In: Blog Discussion

  • Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #15274

    I can’t help but post a response to Vince Anderson’s interview as it was great to see how coaches are coaching coaches. Currently the industry standard is to use interns as slave labor to mindless chores such as cleaning weight rooms, following cookie cutter programs, and doing grunt work. In exchange the intern is expecting a letter of recommendation so they can get a real coaching job somewher

    Continue reading…

    Avatar
    Participant
    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #76954

    Who do you think benefits the most from mentorships?

    It does seem to be all the rage lately, especially with Cressey and DeFranco jumping on board. I thought about doing one with Poliquin years ago but when I added up the cost of it plus travel, food, hotel, AND lost wages from time off, it was too expensive.

    Can’t say I blame them, though. Cha-ching!!!

    Avatar
    Participant
    Novice on #76957

    The idea of experiential learning or apprenticeships would be a great addition or expansion to the education programs already offered by USTAF. One can not master coaching by reading books and internalizing that knowledge…there has to be a practicum.

    Adding, to that I think materials for coaching should be peer reviewed(not my idea but Tom Tellez recommended this in a Athleticscoaching.ca interview).

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77075

    USATF mentorships with approved coaches has been put on the table as a possibility for CE division.

    I can say that I would be nothing if not for those I have had the opportunity to mentor under both on a day to day basis (Ethan Reeve & Boo Schexnayder) and remotely (Pfaff). I did not pay for any of them and despite entering a private practice like many of those coaches mentioned above, I would be ashamed of myself to charge someone to be my apprentice. This of course is assuming they’re offering their services in return. Not only is it like asking someone to PAY to work for you but it would also be disrespectful to those who have helped me so much. I do not know their circumstances so I am not necessarily critiquing what they do but I couldn’t ever see myself doing something like that if I ever got to the point where I could be in a mentor role. I will say though that if it were something where the person just wanted to get a Poliquin / Cressey / DeFranco / etc mentorship and they were not going to assist with any day to day operations but just wanted an education (ala online learning at the university level), then I can certainly see the need to charge for that service.

    RE: peer reviewed coaching…very interesting idea. I think it would expose many top coaches as frauds. The Eastern Bloc countries used to have something like this. But then again, coaches there were respected like Doctors and Lawyers.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Avatar
    Participant
    Daniel Andrews on #77079

    I must have missed this thread arguing over something as useless as politics (I didn’t say governance). Anyways, right now I am having a hard time cracking into the collegiate ranks and I have offered my services as a volunteer and as a paid assistant depending on the level of school, but partly this is do to my limitations in were I must live and other parental concerns as volunteer coaching of course doesn’t feed my child or pay the bills specifically for two domiciles if I had to coach farther away from home since my girlfriend has the stable income being a teacher.

    As far as mentoring goes, I don’t need much in terms of sprints and jumps (I would certainly work for Dan,Boo, or Pfaff without hesitation if I could support my family through some other means), but hurdles and throws are two areas where I think I do well coaching, but I have some gray areas where I think working with a good coach who knows how to teach as well can get me going in the right direction with those to event areas.

    Anyways are Doctors and Lawyers respected that much to begin with? There recurring revenue streams depend on hypochondriacs, sickness, or the perpetuation of sickness and protection from laws or misdeeds of others after the fact.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77080

    Anyways are Doctors and Lawyers respected that much to begin with? There recurring revenue streams depend on hypochondriacs, sickness, or the perpetuation of sickness and protection from laws or misdeeds of others after the fact.

    True but they are still held up as the beacon of achievement and education in the U.S. After kids stop wanting to be astronauts, firemen and princesses, they start wanting to be doctors and lawyers it seems. Think of how many enter pre-med or pre-law only to find out it’s not what they really want.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Avatar
    Participant
    Daniel Andrews on #77085

    [quote author="dbandre" date="1232799478"]

    Anyways are Doctors and Lawyers respected that much to begin with? There recurring revenue streams depend on hypochondriacs, sickness, or the perpetuation of sickness and protection from laws or misdeeds of others after the fact.

    True but they are still held up as the beacon of achievement and education in the U.S. After kids stop wanting to be astronauts, firemen and princesses, they start wanting to be doctors and lawyers it seems. Think of how many enter pre-med or pre-law only to find out it’s not what they really want.[/quote]

    Maybe, because the smart people figure out its not about helping the sick, lawless, wronged, injured, etc… It’s about preventing those things thus the smarter people tend to be engineers, scientists, inventors, etc.. (Doctors and Lawyers are not excluded from those groups, but they tend to be on the rare side of having inventive or engineering qualities)

    If you had 15 people in the world with you, how many of them would you want to be doctors or lawyers? I would want all of them to have some sort of creative talent expressed in their works and half of them to be women.

    How does this part of thread help me become a better hurdles and throws coach and ultimately a better multi’s coach?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #77086

    Maybe, because the smart people figure out its not about helping the sick, lawless, wronged, injured, etc… It’s about preventing those things thus the smarter people tend to be engineers, scientists, inventors, etc..

    Total supposition.

    If you had 15 people in the world with you, how many of them would you want to be doctors or lawyers? I would want all of them to have some sort of creative talent expressed in their works and half of them to be women.

    My point was never about me…it’s about what fields are held in the highest regard in the United States? I will end my input that I think the majority of people will consider doctors and probably to a much lesser extent lawyers as leaders in that area.

    How does this part of thread help me become a better hurdles and throws coach and ultimately a better multi’s coach?

    Doctors have to do residencies before they are cleared to become “real” doctors. They also must undergo strict licensure. I could be wrong but these are things that were also required in Eastern Bloc countries. See! I can tie this all back in!

    ELITETRACK Founder

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.