Hypertrophy

Posted In: The Classics

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    Jay Turner on #8627

    How do you train for hypertrophy and how does it benefit a sprinter?

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    QUIKAZHELL on #22532

    depends what kind of hypertrophy we are talking about, fuctional or nonfunctional. However im assuming you mean extra muscle mass. this should only be the goal when an athlete is reasonably skinny (uaully the case of an athlete with an early training age) and his or her strengths are suffering because of it.

    High volume and reps of 8-12 near failure would accomplish this.

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    delldell on #22533

    Wouldn't that emphasize sarcoplasmic hypertrophy more than myofibrillar?

    For track, just gaing size for size wouldn't seem to be the best idea. I'd think rather somewhat slower hypertrophy from slightly lower reps (4-6) would be better.

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    QUIKAZHELL on #22534

    CORRECT. but…
    i was tlaking about if an athlete needs to get more size.

    you know those little skinny guys that are freshmen in college and have never picked up a weight before. they need to work out at 8-12 reps to gain some muscle mass that will have a positive affect on their weight/strengthg ratio later on. but i agree for the athlete that has been lifting for years and developed there body they should only focus on functional hypertrophy which would be done by dong under 6 reps of olympic lifts and core exersises such as bench, squat, and shoulder press.

    https://elitetrack.com/messageboard/viewthread.php?tid=169

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    Jay Turner on #22535

    So if an athlete needs more size then something like 3-5 sets of 8-12 reps to failure would do the trick?

    When you say they need to do this early on do you mean during the GPP of training?

    Explain what you mean by "near failure" or "to failure"?

    What is the difference between sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar?

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    400stud on #22536

    Near failure or to failure refers to when you can only do the prescribed amount of reps. Like, you do your 12RM for 12 reps and can't do a 13th. Help?

    I'm not sure about the difference b/t the types of lifting re: sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar.

    Usually you would do hypertrophy training during GPP or SPP. Most of the time GPP is for accumulation weights like 12-15 reps and then going into SPP you do hypertrophy, then max strength during pre-comp. and maintenance during comp./peak. I think, not 100% for sure.

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    delldell on #22537

    sarcoplasmic-increase in volume of muscle fluid/non contractile
    myofibrillar-enlargement of muscle fibers

    Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy comes more from the higher rep ranges. It'd be good in GPP or the off-season as has been said. Mainly because a larger muscle has a better chance of becoming stronger. Other sports might need it just because bigger is better sometimes i.e. football, basketball. For football and basketball, in-season workouts would probably be more focused towards maintaining muscle mass, but I guess for Track it's more about peaking.

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    400stud on #22538

    So basically sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is bad, meaning myofibrillar is good, right?

    Delldell – For track it's more about increasing strength:bodyweight ratio which helps out in any aspect of all events in track and field. Hypertrophy just happens to come along, but it's usually never the goal.

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    delldell on #22539

    Yes, I think you could say that to an extent.

    Stength:Weight ratio is important in every sport, but probably the most in Track and then Football.

    For football you'd need extra size just for size's sake as long as it doesn't slow you down.

    I guess if you get bigger from sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, eventually those muscles can become denser from myofibrillar hypertropy, thus stronger. That's the main advantage for athletes generally speaking.

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    matt on #22540

    This seems like a good place to discuss a new form of hypertrophy training known as Density Training. This method was developed by Coach Ethan Reeve at Wake Forest University. You still use the basic guidelines for hypertrophy training, 60%-80% for 8-12 reps. Take your goal volume, say 8 reps, and use the same intensity that you would normally use, 80%. Now double your volume, that makes 16 reps at 80%. Instead of doing 2 sets of 8 with 80% you divide the number of total reps by 4 and get 4 sets of 4 with 80%. Note your still doing 16 reps with 80%. The reason for making the reps lower is because about the first 4 reps with that percentage can be done with perfect form, after that form deteriorates. Also you don't lose as much bar speed because fatigue does not set in until the later reps. Now as far as rest periods go you only take about 15 seconds between sets. This allows the body to recuperate some but not totally.
    Several methods are in play here, like lactic acid tolerance training and compensatory acceleration. By using this method you can actually combine power, hypertrophy, and endurance. This ended up being a lot longer than I wanted it to be.
    Hopefully I explained this well. I welcome any questions or comments.

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    QUIKAZHELL on #22541

    intersting.
    what would the outcome of this type of training be? added muscle mass or functional hypertrophy? and when would this be used during the trainign year for a track athlete?

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    delldell on #22542

    That idea sounds interesting. I've heard a similar idea of doing reps in the 3-5 range with multiple sets and little rest.

    I remember your journal mentioning this, so how have the results been? What type of exercises would you use this on? If your form wasn't really suffering, wouldn't this method only really have speed of movement going for it?

    It'd be like: 4 reps 15 s 4 reps 15s 4 reps 15s 4 reps 15s instead of
    8 reps 1-2 minutes 8 reps

    I guess that'd also work endurance then like you said? But what about TUT?

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    400stud on #22543

    That sounds tight. I like the idea. But, like Quik said, when/how would you incorporate this into a macrocycle?

    Mike Young
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    Mike Young on #22544

    Matt and I both worked for Coach Reeve and can both attest to the effectiveness of this program. It works well and if you look back through old strength threads I've mentioned this same general setup before, although I typically would use more rest. I think it's great for neural facilitation which leads to big strength gains without the bulk.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    QUIKAZHELL on #22545

    so what time of the year should it be used and for how long and what type of routine should follow it?

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