Horizontal Forces and Acceleration

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #17736

    “We speculated that, during the acceleration phase, the most favorable magnitude of relative vertical impulse is one that creates a flight time just long enough to allow repositioning of the lower limbs; all other strength reserves should be directed horizontally.”-Auckland University of TechnologyAcceleration is very horizontally influenced because of posture, not muscle recruitment. During in

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #109733

    Acceleration is very horizontally influenced because of posture, not muscle recruitment.

    Posture does play a big role but I just want to say that since doing isolated strengthening for my feet my improvements have been uncanny & not just in the acceleration phase.

    In the case of Lemaitre’s continuing success, I believe this is one of his big secrets.

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    Randy Gillon on #109734

    What sort of strengthening exercises have you been doing?

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    star61 on #109743

    What sort of strengthening exercises have you been doing?

    And what sort of improvement do you mean by “uncanny”?

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    JeremyRichmond on #109834

    “We speculated that, during the acceleration phase, the most favorable magnitude of relative vertical impulse is one that creates a flight time just long enough to allow repositioning of the lower limbs; all other strength reserves should be directed horizontally.”-Auckland University of TechnologyAcceleration is very horizontally influenced because of posture, not muscle recruitment. During in

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    This is a very simple answer: sprinters minimise flight time whilst accelerating (hence a focus on stride rate) because they do not want to spend much time (and distance) at slower speeds. For example a sprinter leaves the block at 4.18 m/s (Coh et al. 2006) and increases velocity to 4.52 m/s in the first step and increases their velocity to 6.03 m/s in the second step and so on and so forth. Logic suggests that a sprinter get their foot on the ground sooner rather than later so that they can travel as much of the race at a higher velocity. Using this logic the sprinter adjusts their vertical displacement to suit repositioning of the legs to provide as much force as possible when they land.

    With respect to posture; adopting a low down position during acceleration is only possible because the centre-of-gravity starts ahead of the point of force application (i.e. the feet) in the blocks. Eventually as speed increases it becomes important to get the legs moving as fast as possible (and cover greater distances) which is more achievable in an upright position.

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