Hip thrusts the impact they can have on jumping or sprinting power ?

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        dan1990 on #17700

        Are hip thrusts an effective exercise for developing specific glute strength for athletes. They do isolate the glutes but is the exercise beneficial for athletes or should we just stick to squats and powercleans rdl etc..or possibly a good assitance exercise.Your opininons ?

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        st06002583@outlook.uwic.ac.uk on #116129

        Good supplementary lift IMO. Will help all other lifts also.

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #110261

        Are hip thrusts an effective exercise for developing specific glute strength for athletes. They do isolate the glutes but is the exercise beneficial for athletes or should we just stick to squats and powercleans rdl etc..or possibly a good assitance exercise.Your opininons ?

        Nobody knows…it’s an exercise that has value, how much impact we are still waiting after 4 years to see a spike in improvement.

        CV

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        mortac8 on #114041

        In the past 4 years, the 100m WR has been destroyed by a huge margin. A coincidence? 🙂

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        dan1990 on #114042

        Lets say a novice or beginner group of athletes performs
        Sprints/ plyos with squats 3 times a week vs a group performing sprints/ plyos with hip thrusts vs a group who performs sprints/ plyos with squats and hip thrusts..pretty general outline. which method would you choose ?

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        W.E. Price on #114044

        I had thought that hip thrusts might’ve been a good support exercise for stabilization and vertical projection.

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        up-andcoming@hotmail.com on #110226

        Hip thrust are awesome. I treat it as one of my main lifts now and am up to 290kg for 4reps. I’ve noticed it increasing my power in the transition phase most, it’s like I’m dropping bombs onto the track. Last year I was probably a 10.8 guy, by next year I’m looking to be on the better side of 10 seconds. Along with serious hip flexor work(strength, power and speed with various bands and cables), hip thrusts are an invaluable tool, IMO.

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        dan1990 on #115623

        Hip thrust are awesome. I treat it as one of my main lifts now and am up to 290kg for 4reps. I’ve noticed it increasing my power in the transition phase most, it’s like I’m dropping bombs onto the track. Last year I was probably a 10.8 guy, by next year I’m looking to be on the better side of 10 seconds. Along with serious hip flexor work(strength, power and speed with various bands and cables), hip thrusts are an invaluable tool, IMO.

        }
        Wasnt aware that track athletes were using hip thrusts in their training. Hip thrusts would also be good at strengthing the hip flexors but mainly targeting the glutes. 290kg is a big weight so you obviously have been using the exercise consistently overa period of time.
        How CNS intensive would the exercise be.Would it induce the same CNS fatigue as squats for example

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #114982

        Hip thrust are awesome. I treat it as one of my main lifts now and am up to 290kg for 4reps. I’ve noticed it increasing my power in the transition phase most, it’s like I’m dropping bombs onto the track. Last year I was probably a 10.8 guy, by next year I’m looking to be on the better side of 10 seconds. Along with serious hip flexor work(strength, power and speed with various bands and cables), hip thrusts are an invaluable tool, IMO.

        Any meets? “Probably” a 10.8 guy? Increasing power in the transition phase? The better side of 10 seconds? I want to believe you but this sounds like myth.

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #111632

        [quote author="Ben Reynolds" date="1341566865"]Hip thrust are awesome. I treat it as one of my main lifts now and am up to 290kg for 4reps. I’ve noticed it increasing my power in the transition phase most, it’s like I’m dropping bombs onto the track. Last year I was probably a 10.8 guy, by next year I’m looking to be on the better side of 10 seconds. Along with serious hip flexor work(strength, power and speed with various bands and cables), hip thrusts are an invaluable tool, IMO.

        }
        Wasnt aware that track athletes were using hip thrusts in their training. Hip thrusts would also be good at strengthing the hip flexors but mainly targeting the glutes. 290kg is a big weight so you obviously have been using the exercise consistently overa period of time.
        How CNS intensive would the exercise be.Would it induce the same CNS fatigue as squats for example[/quote]

        Incorporate anything you feel will help, but measure progress by timing practices and meets. Glute strength is important and the hip thrust is one option that can help. Still no magic bullets or exercises exist. Keep us posted on your meet or game success in detail with electronic timing or FAT results.

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        Anthony Wallace on #111659

        I am really like this exercise and at the college I used to work at I got the baseball assistant coach into it and we both have seen benefits. He has been able to throw harder with ease(he is a AA baseball player who had Tommy John Surgery and was a DivAAA All-American 6’5 Righty) and sprinting for me has become easier(I was able to get back to Jumping as I used too and sprinting down the runway became easier). But like you said Carl, its going to take a few years and research to show it really works. I am into year 3 of using the exercise and so is members of my club team Samyr Laine & Ayanna Alexander(2 athletes who will be triple jumping in London). My club team still doing the main lifts but we have added this in to work on the glutes. But TRUE research to see the TRUE benefits of the exercise is needed. Only issue that we have all seen for sure(and this goes for the baseball assistant and myself) is that our achillies took a toll at first. *not sure why but we all had to really do lower leg strengthen exercises, and I had to really increase my hip strengthen exercises as well to keep all in perfect harmony.
        So Carl you are probably the best person for this or know someone who could do the research.

        FYI just my take on the exercise

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        dan1990 on #114098

        I agree with what you are saying Carl. Do i feel hip thrusts will Help ? i dont know its a relatively new exercise but it does seem to be increasing in popularity. Im going to incorporate the exercise for 6 weeks and report with results. I think it should help my concentic or standing jumps SLJ and SVJ. Imho the exercise does not to be more focussed on the concentric aspect rather than an eccentric emphasis.

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #111618

        Treat it like a calf raise and reverse press…it has value but one muscle and one exercise is not magic. My fear is that we are expecting too much from it. Nobody is willing to say it’s worth .2 in the 100m for those under 10 seconds, if it was I would be the first eat crow and do it like crazy.

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        Anthony Wallace on #115371

        I’m with you on that one Carl & dan1990 please do report the results. I have been doing it for the last 2 years but I am only 1 person, so whatever results you get please share.

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        up-andcoming@hotmail.com on #115375

        [quote author="Ben Reynolds" date="1341566865"]Hip thrust are awesome. I treat it as one of my main lifts now and am up to 290kg for 4reps. I’ve noticed it increasing my power in the transition phase most, it’s like I’m dropping bombs onto the track. Last year I was probably a 10.8 guy, by next year I’m looking to be on the better side of 10 seconds. Along with serious hip flexor work(strength, power and speed with various bands and cables), hip thrusts are an invaluable tool, IMO.

        }
        Wasnt aware that track athletes were using hip thrusts in their training. Hip thrusts would also be good at strengthing the hip flexors but mainly targeting the glutes. 290kg is a big weight so you obviously have been using the exercise consistently overa period of time.
        How CNS intensive would the exercise be.Would it induce the same CNS fatigue as squats for example[/quote]

        Lol misunderstood my post about hip flexor work, my fault for wording it badly. I mean much of the focus on my training is also on hip flexor work (knee drives with various levels of resistance with bands and cables). The hip thrust has shown to work he glutes more than any other exercise, in terms of peak activation/maximal contraction, and the reason why is simply mechanics/force vectors.

        Any meets? “Probably” a 10.8 guy? Increasing power in the transition phase? The better side of 10 seconds? I want to believe you but this sounds like myth.

        I’m a hurdler so rarely race on the flat (would have this season if not for injury), hence the estimating. A few months ago, I was racing my training partners, a 10.64 junior sprinter, and another junior who runs 10.67 (they both ran these times today, and the former ran 10.67 last season) from blocks over 50m. I had done almost no sprint work leading up to then due to injury but was still beating both those guys by at least 2-3 meters on every run. That plus the fact I feel much much faster now, means I would certainly expect to at least break 10.50 in my current form.

        As it stands, I am very very strong in the hip flexors, glutes and hamstrings, the most bang-for-buck muscles in sprinting, and I am most likely very fast twitch in those muscles too (high calorie diet, certain vitamin supplementation, fast-eccentrics) yet I am lacking greatly in fiber length still. Thus at the moment I’m doing a massive amount of flexibility work, and other training to get my fascicles longer, so expect further speed gains from that. Not least as I become properly fit and healthy (getting there) I will be able to actually SPRINT in training, which will certainly lead to gains as well. Thus the high aims in my flat speed for next season.

        And by transition zone again I am guessing as that’s all I can do. That is the point I seem to fly away from everyone else when I sprint against them, and I can really feel improvements in the speed of downward drive of my leg (which is when the glute fires most in during the sprint cycle) in this phase especially.

        All in all, I think a sprinter would be unwise to not include an anteroposterior strength/power exercise of some sort in their program.

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        dan1990 on #111684

        I would interested to know what type of hip flexor work you perform?
        How many years have u been incorporating the hip thrust in your workouts

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #111847

        [quote author="dan1990" date="1341589660"][quote author="Ben Reynolds" date="1341566865"]Hip thrust are awesome. I treat it as one of my main lifts now and am up to 290kg for 4reps. I’ve noticed it increasing my power in the transition phase most, it’s like I’m dropping bombs onto the track. Last year I was probably a 10.8 guy, by next year I’m looking to be on the better side of 10 seconds. Along with serious hip flexor work(strength, power and speed with various bands and cables), hip thrusts are an invaluable tool, IMO.

        }
        Wasnt aware that track athletes were using hip thrusts in their training. Hip thrusts would also be good at strengthing the hip flexors but mainly targeting the glutes. 290kg is a big weight so you obviously have been using the exercise consistently overa period of time.
        How CNS intensive would the exercise be.Would it induce the same CNS fatigue as squats for example[/quote]

        Lol misunderstood my post about hip flexor work, my fault for wording it badly. I mean much of the focus on my training is also on hip flexor work (knee drives with various levels of resistance with bands and cables). The hip thrust has shown to work he glutes more than any other exercise, in terms of peak activation/maximal contraction, and the reason why is simply mechanics/force vectors.

        Any meets? “Probably” a 10.8 guy? Increasing power in the transition phase? The better side of 10 seconds? I want to believe you but this sounds like myth.

        I’m a hurdler so rarely race on the flat (would have this season if not for injury), hence the estimating. A few months ago, I was racing my training partners, a 10.64 junior sprinter, and another junior who runs 10.67 (they both ran these times today, and the former ran 10.67 last season) from blocks over 50m. I had done almost no sprint work leading up to then due to injury but was still beating both those guys by at least 2-3 meters on every run. That plus the fact I feel much much faster now, means I would certainly expect to at least break 10.50 in my current form.

        As it stands, I am very very strong in the hip flexors, glutes and hamstrings, the most bang-for-buck muscles in sprinting, and I am most likely very fast twitch in those muscles too (high calorie diet, certain vitamin supplementation, fast-eccentrics) yet I am lacking greatly in fiber length still. Thus at the moment I’m doing a massive amount of flexibility work, and other training to get my fascicles longer, so expect further speed gains from that. Not least as I become properly fit and healthy (getting there) I will be able to actually SPRINT in training, which will certainly lead to gains as well. Thus the high aims in my flat speed for next season.

        And by transition zone again I am guessing as that’s all I can do. That is the point I seem to fly away from everyone else when I sprint against them, and I can really feel improvements in the speed of downward drive of my leg (which is when the glute fires most in during the sprint cycle) in this phase especially.

        All in all, I think a sprinter would be unwise to not include an anteroposterior strength/power exercise of some sort in their program.[/quote]

        My confusion is if you are a 110m hurdler and pulling your hamstring, why is that? I thought the exercise would reduce strain there…what about the other injuries?

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        up-andcoming@hotmail.com on #112164

        My confusion is if you are a 110m hurdler and pulling your hamstring, why is that? I thought the exercise would reduce strain there…what about the other injuries?

        As far as I’m aware it’s been mostly due to my lack of flexibility in and around the hip area, paired with lax lower back ligaments (damaged disk in past doing bears protocol, even though it worked great up to that point!). My hamstring muscles themselves are pristine and always have been *touches wood* but it’s the muscle-tendon junction of my lead leg that had ever so slightly gone on this occasion. It was so minimal that even immediately after it happened I could still at sprint at 80% without much pain, but because hurdling stretches it to the nth degree that was impossible.

        I believe I can trace it back to what I did 5 days before that race. I did the leg cycle drill described on here, where you cycle your leg as fast as possible with between 15-20 reps. As it did before it really made my tendons sore and stiff in the several days following. I should have known not to do it suddenly so close to a race. My hamstrings as a result had felt dodgy in all the days leading into that race. Having said that I think it’s a great over-speed exercise, working with contraction velocities probably even great than during sprinting since it’s unloaded. But yeah, that’s hindsight for you! My other injury is mild Osteitis Pubis(i.e. irritation of pelvic bone itself) which again is caused by lack of flexibility in and around the pelvis, and certainly wasn’t helped by ever increasing strength levels.

        But yeah pleased to say the flexibility is increasing at a great rate now, rehabbing is going great, and within a few months I’ll have the range to fully adopt a truly world class clearance technique (based mainly off Xiang).

        Annoying that I need to stop the hip thrusts (and all lifting in fact) for a few weeks to left the Osteitis settle, was about to attempt 300kg!

        And Dan, the hip flexor stuff I do is mainly standing knee drives with bands of varying strength attach to the ankle, hitting all ranges (sometimes work only the above 90 degree portion to target the psoas), but perhaps focusing on end range for specificity (in sprint cycle hip flexors work most to decelerate the back swing, working eccentrically). I’ll also work them eccentrically with a full stack on the cable machine, standing away from it, with feet together, and yielding to let the cable pull my leg back up behind my body (cable at about 4foot high), getting a real good stretch too.

        Also do the Asafa drill among some other things, which is basically extremely high knee lifts down the track(eventually with ankle weights) for about 100m or more until your are feeling a serious burn. I did this the past winter to help hypertrophy the hip flexors, especially the psoas. When you start getting a psoas gut you know your doing it right;).

        It’s been mainly this winter that I implemented all of this, including hip thrusts. Started with 120kg for those, and should be at 320kg/700lbs soon!

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        Rune Brix on #113179

        Glute brigdes do not in isolation reduce strain on the hamstring.

        Hip flexor training and glute bridges can significantly increase strain on the hamstrings (biceps femoris more specifically) if they cause excessive external rotation of femur and decreased posterior pelvic tilt of the pelvis at terminal knee extension.

        What will reduce strain on the hamstrings is progressivly increasing speed and volume of sprint training and increased posterior pelvic tilt and adduction, internal rotation of the femur at terminal knee extension. Also eccentric training of biceps femoris with glute ham raises or nordic hamstring.

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #116133

        [quote author="Carl Valle" date="1341631789"]My confusion is if you are a 110m hurdler and pulling your hamstring, why is that? I thought the exercise would reduce strain there…what about the other injuries?

        As far as I’m aware it’s been mostly due to my lack of flexibility in and around the hip area, paired with lax lower back ligaments (damaged disk in past doing bears protocol, even though it worked great up to that point!). My hamstring muscles themselves are pristine and always have been *touches wood* but it’s the muscle-tendon junction of my lead leg that had ever so slightly gone on this occasion. It was so minimal that even immediately after it happened I could still at sprint at 80% without much pain, but because hurdling stretches it to the nth degree that was impossible.

        I believe I can trace it back to what I did 5 days before that race. I did the leg cycle drill described on here, where you cycle your leg as fast as possible with between 15-20 reps. As it did before it really made my tendons sore and stiff in the several days following. I should have known not to do it suddenly so close to a race. My hamstrings as a result had felt dodgy in all the days leading into that race. Having said that I think it’s a great over-speed exercise, working with contraction velocities probably even great than during sprinting since it’s unloaded. But yeah, that’s hindsight for you! My other injury is mild Osteitis Pubis(i.e. irritation of pelvic bone itself) which again is caused by lack of flexibility in and around the pelvis, and certainly wasn’t helped by ever increasing strength levels.

        But yeah pleased to say the flexibility is increasing at a great rate now, rehabbing is going great, and within a few months I’ll have the range to fully adopt a truly world class clearance technique (based mainly off Xiang).

        Annoying that I need to stop the hip thrusts (and all lifting in fact) for a few weeks to left the Osteitis settle, was about to attempt 300kg!

        And Dan, the hip flexor stuff I do is mainly standing knee drives with bands of varying strength attach to the ankle, hitting all ranges (sometimes work only the above 90 degree portion to target the psoas), but perhaps focusing on end range for specificity (in sprint cycle hip flexors work most to decelerate the back swing, working eccentrically). I’ll also work them eccentrically with a full stack on the cable machine, standing away from it, with feet together, and yielding to let the cable pull my leg back up behind my body (cable at about 4foot high), getting a real good stretch too.

        Also do the Asafa drill among some other things, which is basically extremely high knee lifts down the track(eventually with ankle weights) for about 100m or more until your are feeling a serious burn. I did this the past winter to help hypertrophy the hip flexors, especially the psoas. When you start getting a psoas gut you know your doing it right;).

        It’s been mainly this winter that I implemented all of this, including hip thrusts. Started with 120kg for those, and should be at 320kg/700lbs soon![/quote]

        My Guess is Xiang isn’t doing 300 kilo hip thrusts or tons of band resisted knee drives. The psoas gut is likely the start of a sports hernia.

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        Rune Brix on #111352

        Strecthing will most likely not chance fascicle length. And increased fascicle length will most likely not improve perfomance.

        Their are alot of theoretical problems with the glut bridge. And also more pragmatik problems like Technic.
        1. The loading is horizontal, most of the load to overcome in sprinting is vertical in natur.
        2. The limiting faktor for increasing weight in the excercise is concentrics strength in inner lane of the gluts. In sprinting the primarie load, is mid and outer range.
        3. The systemic load on the body is low, and while the exercise shows High EMg activity i predict the micro trauma in gluts is a lot less than lunge and squatting due to the lack of overload in the hole length of the muscle. EMG does not measure load on the passiv structures and due to ssc their is a load on these in squatting exercises

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        Josh Hurlebaus on #111544

        If you’re this Ben Reynolds, https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/athletics/17325114 , then I’d hate to see you get hung up on a single exercise and run into a string of injuries. Glute power is certainly a key to sprinting fast, but if the hams don’t have the eccentric strength to handle it upon gct, you are going to have problems. Just curious, but where is the injury in the hamstring?

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        Rune Brix on #116280

        Injuries in the hamstring mostly affect

      • Carl Valle
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        Carl Valle on #116279

        Ben can certainly be good enough to hit 13.3 range and I hope he stays healthy. Moderation is key, as I think everyone get’s excited for magic bullets. So far I think Bolt ran 9.5 because he was bolt, not because he was consulting with a strength coach on specific exercises. If you are getting hurt because of training (off the track) rethink the process. Get hurt in meets or practice doing the event and people will understand because of the risk to return, not getting hurt doing exercises or even drills that seem to create massive psoas structures. Also psoas cross section is highly genetic and tinkering with what you were born with too much is a recipe for disaster.

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        t.hartis@yahoo.co.uk on #115377

        Ben, anecdotally before the evidence police jump down your throat:
        Im assuming the junior sprinters havent done that much lifting but have any other guys in your group or anyone else you know implemented this lift? If so, any decent improvement on the track? do they feel similarly more powerful?
        Have you heard of anyone picking up any injury that they could trace back to introducing this lift?
        Have cleans, deads, squats felt easier since you’ve been pushing the weight up on the hip thrusts?
        Have you felt more powerful in any aspect of hurdling: into h1, off the hurdle, between the barriers?
        Do your jeans still fit?

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        mortac8 on #116397

        Glute brigdes do not in isolation reduce strain on the hamstring.

        Hip flexor training and glute bridges can significantly increase strain on the hamstrings (biceps femoris more specifically) if they cause excessive external rotation of femur and decreased posterior pelvic tilt of the pelvis at terminal knee extension.

        What will reduce strain on the hamstrings is progressivly increasing speed and volume of sprint training and increased posterior pelvic tilt and adduction, internal rotation of the femur at terminal knee extension. Also eccentric training of biceps femoris with glute ham raises or nordic hamstring.

        How does adduction and internal rotation of the femur reduce strain on the hamstrings at TKE? Are you saying it takes it away from BF and puts it a bit more on adductor magnus?

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        Rune Brix on #116735

        Evidence is not an argument of truth, Its a logical predection, based on assumptions. Anyone claiming that a excercises is a game changer, is
        making alot of assumptions based on a predection that is not logical.
        One guys experience of an excercises is at best a case study…an is in not logical because of the size of the data material. An alot of assumptions are made when net picking that the perfomance enhancement was from this One excercises.

        Its very fair to critise science, it full of flaws. But the reasonening process of the greAt benefits of the glute bridge, put forth so far, is at best a good story. Hopefully we Will have more knowledge of the matter in the future.

        Many years of knowledge sharing of empirical Evidence from a very objektiv sport is great knowledge. Track and field, cycling, swimminng and so forth. Data to look carefully at, because its alot less reduktionistisk than most sciencific studies. But with a careful eye because of tradition and false Logic. I personally Think we are focusing on alot of stuff that might have very little impact, and missing out on important Stuff because of the complexity of things. Hopefully reasearch, debat and a most needed sharing of data, knowledge and know-how will provide knew insight.

        If an excercises doesnt decrease perfomance or increase injuri risk dó Add it, maybe your lucky and respond well to it. Removing excercises that have proven themself for décades, like squats, because someone writes an article on the limits of squatting and the great benefits on single leg squatting is lack of understanding for the complexity of the art and science of track and field coaching. The same goes for glut bridges. If it fits the program do add them, we Will never learn if we never try, But please share your experience, keep some good data collecting and dont stop reflecting on the whys and whens.

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        dan1990 on #115098

        I do agree with Rune Brix. Theres is no denying that there is a lot of buzz about the hip thrust and yes theyre are no magic bullets but could this exercise contribute to an increase in hip/glute power yes it could. I have incorporated the it and will see if it is of any benefit. Loaded the exercise with very high loads may be too much stress on the hips but i think it will be a good supplement with oly lift and a squat

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        kwave90@gmail.com on #117629

        I haven’t tried hip thrusts to know if it helps at all, but it sounds like it can as a good assistant exercise. It clearly allows resisted hip hyperextension to strengthen that motion (which doesn’t occur in squat) and personally, I’d be excited to try it because it seems more glute dominant than hamstrings and I think I have more hamstrings than glutes (I live with hamstring DOMS…). Although I’m no expert (yet) at this matter, I do know that sitted calf raises are more soleus dominant and standing calf raises are more gastc dominant, so because of knee flexion which causes shortened hamstrings, I think it would use more glutes.

        Also, it would likely probably help more horizontal (sprinting, long jump) rather than vertical (high, VJ) because VJ doesn’t involve hip hyperextension and is more quad dominant.

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