Forget Being in the Zone & You Might Find Yourself There

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    Joe Spano on #15595

    It’s the bottom of the ninth, the last 10 meters, forth and 1, 6 seconds left; whatever the sport situation is, performing at your best is crucial. So how do we make sure you are at your best even when the pressure is on? Why do some players of similar abilities have consistently different outcomes? For top-level/elite athletes they know that they need to practice and train for their mental sk

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    Aaron Springer on #81085

    I am thoroughly enjoying this series of blogs about the mental aspects of sports.

    It’s a weaker area for myself and I’ve picked up a few tips from your blogs.
    Thank you!

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    Joe Spano on #81088

    I am happy to hear that!

    If there are some specific topics you would like me to write about let me know. I’ll do my best to address them in an upcoming post.

    -Joe

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    RussZHC on #81093

    I agree with yet have difficulty with: “being creative” and “consistency” with the difficulty being a matter, I think, of timing/degree. Are you not asking a lot, if not too much, for someone to be consistent, let’s say using certain things functionally in training and then saying “be creative” when it comes to competition. I am not saying they are mutual exclusive but could influence to very good or very bad results.

    To me consistency has connotations of being “safe”, “reliable” whereas “creative” says, “take a chance”. Results that are solid but not spectacular or outstanding results but hit and miss. I am not sure being creative within a safe parameter(s) would mean all that much in many situations. If you are going to “step out of the box”, then really step but for most that is simply too risky. Athletes staying with coaches though the results from that training regime having proven themselves to rarely work springs to mind.

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    Mccabe on #81100

    A good read. I find this kind of stuff highly important to competing and I’m looking forward to reading your next post.

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    Joe Spano on #81129

    I agree with yet have difficulty with: “being creative” and “consistency” with the difficulty being a matter, I think, of timing/degree. Are you not asking a lot, if not too much, for someone to be consistent, let’s say using certain things functionally in training and then saying “be creative” when it comes to competition. I am not saying they are mutual exclusive but could influence to very good or very bad results.

    To me consistency has connotations of being “safe”, “reliable” whereas “creative” says, “take a chance”. Results that are solid but not spectacular or outstanding results but hit and miss. I am not sure being creative within a safe parameter(s) would mean all that much in many situations. If you are going to “step out of the box”, then really step but for most that is simply too risky. Athletes staying with coaches though the results from that training regime having proven themselves to rarely work springs to mind.

    Great discussion points, thanks!

    Let me clarify what I mean by being creative and consistent. Being creative is more for the long term, such as how you will reach your goals. I think trying to be creative each time you perform does go against being consistent but then can work together.

    Take the example of a 200m sprinter. His/her goal of making the U.S. Olympic team may be better reached if their approach to how they can get themselves ready for it through creative training and preparation. The grind of reaching one’s goals can cause burnout/frustration if they do not allow themselves to “mix it up”. It helps keep them focused and more satisfied over the long term.

    As for the other concept of consistency, there has to be consistency in how they prepare/warm-up before each race. Consistency allows the sprinter to feel more relaxed and comfortable with their surroundings. Also the sprinter is going to have to run multiple heats if they do well. Consistency is not referring to the actual performance but more so on the time leading up to it. If the sprinter gets ready the same way but then tries to run a more aggressive race during a heat they are not violating the concept of being “consistent”.

    -Joe

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