Eye of the Tiger

Posted In: Blog Discussion

  • Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #17897

    The LSU Testing tables are great ways to get core data and each coach can test their programs and see what is changing and what is impacting their athlete’s performance. With current articles from Chad Waterbury and Mike Boyle are making people think about force vectors and jumping, my belief is that the data tells a story. Is the relationship positive or negative? Is it strong or weak? The truth

    Continue reading…

    Avatar
    Participant
    rcfan2 on #111485

    Interesting post…thanks for sharing the spreadsheet [needs to be spell checked though :)]

    Curious how useful of a test is the “broad-jump” (standing long jump) and what events/event areas does it have a high correlation to?

    What qualities does it measure and what type of training/exercises are likely to improve it?

    Avatar
    Participant
    JasonRoeWI on #111486

    Get Bondarchuk’s “Transfer of Training in Sport”. As a translation it can be a choppy read, but it is full of tables that correlate performance indicators and all of the track field events. Its excellent.

    Interesting post…thanks for sharing the spreadsheet [needs to be spell checked though :)]

    Curious how useful of a test is the “broad-jump” (standing long jump) and what events/event areas does it have a high correlation to?

    What qualities does it measure and what type of training/exercises are likely to improve it?

    Avatar
    Participant
    rcfan2 on #111492

    Jason,

    Thanks for the reply. While I don’t have Dr. Bondarchuk’s book, I am familiar with his work.

    That being said, as the “broad-jump” (Standing Long Jump) is a frequently prescribed test protocol, I was hopeful that someone who uses the test could answer my questions.

    Better yet, maybe someone who has Dr. Bondarchuk’s “Transfer of Training in Sport” could share his thoughts and observations 🙂

    Avatar
    Participant
    Derrick Brito on #111494

    Download limit has been reached, any chance I could get this from another source?

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #111495

    Get Bondarchuk’s “Transfer of Training in Sport”. As a translation it can be a choppy read, but it is full of tables that correlate performance indicators and all of the track field events. Its excellent.

    [quote author="rcfan2" date="1318629170"]Interesting post…thanks for sharing the spreadsheet [needs to be spell checked though :)]

    Curious how useful of a test is the “broad-jump” (standing long jump) and what events/event areas does it have a high correlation to?

    What qualities does it measure and what type of training/exercises are likely to improve it?

    [/quote]

    Perhaps the Triple jump and different weight hammers have merit but not in the 100m or 110m hurdles….

    First- The Table is a start and not my latest one since I like collaboration by others and more detail of the set-up of tests. No everyone does behind the back tosses with shot boards. Also it’s not the official LSU table as that’s something that others have now and it’s not mine to share. The reason the lifts are used, like the USBF, is to see the relationship of training, not just testing. While testing is training with many modalities, many athletes get better by retesting as they learn how to test better and it’s not a sign of physiological change. If you train the way to test, it may be counter productive as well. Mike Young has the LSU tables and scoring formula I believe.

    Second-I don’t have the answer to if X is this than Y should be that because the context of testing such as timing in the year and style of program is never going to be in the table. The purpose is to get more formal testing and collaboration of others. So long as times are improving in the sprints or distances getting farther in the jumps (throws should not use this), you can see what influences are working and why.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #111496

    Interesting post…thanks for sharing the spreadsheet [needs to be spell checked though :)]

    Curious how useful of a test is the “broad-jump” (standing long jump) and what events/event areas does it have a high correlation to?

    What qualities does it measure and what type of training/exercises are likely to improve it?

    If you can clean it up and upload it that would be helpful. As a community the more eyes the better and the more discussion the better. It’s an example, not holy scripture and I hope collaboration improves.

    Avatar
    Participant
    oshikake@ymail.com on #111500

    What I suggest is download the classic spreadsheet and start charting your own course, and see what relationships you find.

    The NFL combine results/stats for me have been a great tool & bought a lot of thinking time.

    https://www.nfl.com/combine/top-performers#workout=FORTY_YARD_DASH&year=2011&position=QB-RB-WR-TE-S-DL-LB-CB-OL-SPEC

    https://www.nfl.com/combine/top-performers#workout=VERTICAL_JUMP&year=2011&position=QB-RB-WR-TE-S-DL-LB-CB-OL-SPEC

    I’ve come to the conclusion that on the whole/stat for stat there is not much of a correlation at all between how high these trained athletes can jump, broad jump & potentially putting those qualities into sprinting fast/40yd times, (I mean check out the top 10’s year after year) & see where the top verters figure in the 40 tables & vice-versa. There is a obvious pattern emerging, non-correlation.

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #111503

    Interesting post…thanks for sharing the spreadsheet [needs to be spell checked though :)]

    Curious how useful of a test is the “broad-jump” (standing long jump) and what events/event areas does it have a high correlation to?

    What qualities does it measure and what type of training/exercises are likely to improve it?

    The SLJ is the least important commonly used test for horizontal jumpers in my opinion. I don’t even use the test anymore as a result. It does very little to predict anything of use at least for those events.

    I have seen a huge variety of results in comparison to event Pr’s etc…for example, a male with a 3m SLJ with an LJ best of 6.10m! And then another male with a 3.07m SLJ with an LJ best of 8.30m +! Have tons more examples just like this…

    However, i’ve never seen elite performances in certain other common tests without elite performance in the LJ or TJ.

    Avatar
    Participant
    Josh Hurlebaus on #111504

    The double leg bounding tests are the highest correlative test, for me, when it comes to acceleration.

    If I’m over 54ft, I’m in 6.80 or better shape, Any time I’ve ever PR’d in the 5xdouble leg test, I’ve PR’d in the 30m test or the 60m within a week.

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #111505

    I’m also over 54 feet in that test and as you pointed out am not as fast as you…Double leg tests seem to be very individual in my experience.

    Avatar
    Participant
    Josh Hurlebaus on #111506

    Yeah, thus my little caveat (for me). That’s the crux of the whole thing. Long term testing results for the individual = infinitely more useful than some random table someone throws together.

    Use tables to get an idea of what to test, keep good records, and spot correlations.

    Avatar
    Participant
    Josh Hurlebaus on #111507

    For me, much of it has to be down to applying the right or wrong directional load vector exercises in the gym

    Let’s be honest here.

    You have no clue what the hell a vector is.

    Avatar
    Participant
    Craig Pickering on #111508

    Would a forward jump snatch bound apply a correct directional load vector?

    Avatar
    Participant
    Josh Hurlebaus on #111509

    Are you snatching with each successive bound? I can’t be sure until I know full specifics. The loading from the pull will change your phase shift alliance with the earthen gravimetrics.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.