Dynamic Posture and more Spine Tuning

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #15075

    Posture training requires a lot of time and effort, so it is more likely to see transformations with body composition than body alignment. The focus now is on getting thoracic motion to a spine that is likely to be too kyphotic. I believe that the spine will move properly if you train properly. Instead of focusing on corrective exercise prescription I focus on improving technique. The lumbar, cerv

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    Daniel Andrews on #74699

    I don’t know if a picture does justice to what you speak. Doesn’t improving technique involve proper loading in weightlifting? I believe it does. The strength of the muscles of the “core” to stabilize the spine under compressive loads during dynamic movement suggest to myself that the deadlift and back squat should be the 2 primary lifts in any lifting protocol. Are front squats for everyone? No. Can they be? Sure, every able bodied athlete has performed countless deadlifts and front squats with even more complex and non-centered masses when they were children learning to move. It’s weird how watching a growing child learns to move, negotiate obstacles, and moves objects can alter one’s perception of the applications of exercises to training. Watching my 14 month old move and placing obstacles for him to climb or go around and move or let stay put has helped me more than any class or any experience in coaching in re-learning how we move naturally. Children put together natural connections easily and only after years of influence do their movement patterns become so bad they can hardly perform at the efficiency the once possessed as a child when they still had primitive movement patterns.

    Cases in point and I am sure CFKA and Mike can relate:

    A child with a height of 30.5″ and weighing 22lb’s.

    Gallon of water (8 pounds) is moved 20 feet (about 30 steps).
    4 Pound medicine ball picked up and tossed overhead.
    pulling oneself up onto an obstacle at one’s shoulder height.
    Climbing 2 flights of stairs of 10 inches in height about (24 steps).

    The same for a 5-9 160 lb male (my last huge growth spurt, 2 inches and 20lbs)

    8 gallons (64 pounds) of water moved in 30 steps.
    32 pound medicine balled picked up and tossed overhead.
    Climbing stairs of 30 inches in height for 24 steps.

    Think of the same for a 5-5 110 lb male (my first growth spurt in puberty, 5 inches and 15 pounds in 3 months)

    5 gallons (40 lbs) moved 30 steps
    20 pound medicine ball picked up and tossed overhead
    Climbing stairs of 28 inches for 24 steps.

    When I was 5-6 110lbs I would have struggled to complete the same tasks as my child does based on height and weight despite having what I thought was very good movement efficiency. When I was 5-9 160lbs I would not have struggled. The differences would be overall strength and power. However, with today’s adolescent and teenage athletes I know many who fit the same characteristics I had and some with better strength and power numbers relative to weight who would struggle because almost all of them have a lack of balance in their training background. If you are going to have a harder time moving a sloshing bottle of water for 30 steps than an infant does with more complex coordinated structures and movement patterns then you are going to have a hard time being a successful athlete.

    Is it coaching or is it the athletes? I would suggested it’s the sterilized world of athletics and physical education we now have were dads are “coaching”, gurus are specializing and correcting, therapists are correcting, were we waste weekends 50 weeks out of the year for children to play organized sports or sit the bench to watch the better players till they are sick of the sport because it is no longer fun. There is no learning after age the of 4 anymore, it’s all about correcting. I can hardly blame the athlete for all misguided attention and information he receives. Then all the sudden he’s loaded up to clean a weight his squat suggests he should clean and he cannot execute it properly? I wonder why? It must be the Wii or Xbox or even dammit Facebook/Myspace. Well that’s a BS argument too, I and many others of my generation had Nintendo and played super mario bros endlessly, made my own computers, made my own computer games, but myself and others of my generation were nowhere near as incompetent in simple movement skills and tasks as most of the athletes I have coached. For all the negativity computers, game systems, and tv gets about physical fitness of today’s children no one wants to take a look at the real culprit, because at least they are doing something active. It’s about competence and once someone realizes they are competent.

    Sorry about the rant and getting off topic a little Carl.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #74700

    The photo shows a clear flexed spine with knees out and but nearly tucked under. This is clear. I am not sure what you are saying but the lift is clearly not helping thoracic extension and his glutes are not developed. If you can’t see this I don’t know what to say.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #74704

    One thing’s for sure, the person who taught this kid clearly sucks. I bet this kid probably does olympic lifts, too!

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    hscoach on #74709

    it scares the crap out of me when i see a hs kid with that type of posture while squatting. worse yet is when no one else makes an effort to correct it. Carl … what would you do with this young man to help him? i usually have them grab a med ball and perform overhead squats with emphasis on keeping weight on heels and off the toes.

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    Daniel Andrews on #74712

    The photo shows a clear flexed spine with knees out and but nearly tucked under. This is clear. I am not sure what you are saying but the lift is clearly not helping thoracic extension and his glutes are not developed. If you can’t see this I don’t know what to say.

    I wasn’t disputing what the picture showed. I only wish you had more pictures. It’s far to prevalent. I was just going over my observations of the last 5 years and relating what I have seen in growing children who perform front squats all the time, yet somehow after the age of 4 they stop developing the ability to move loads from the front.

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    Daniel Andrews on #74713

    One thing’s for sure, the person who taught this kid clearly sucks. I bet this kid probably does olympic lifts, too!

    The picture is of an olympic lift, the clean if I am not mistaken.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #74714

    it scares the crap out of me when i see a hs kid with that type of posture while squatting. worse yet is when no one else makes an effort to correct it. Carl … what would you do with this young man to help him? i usually have them grab a med ball and perform overhead squats with emphasis on keeping weight on heels and off the toes.

    I will post a response….later.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #74715

    One thing’s for sure, the person who taught this kid clearly sucks. I bet this kid probably does olympic lifts, too!

    The coach has a DVD on olympic lifts Mr.Glove and speaks nationally. but the front squat and clean catch is similar enough to be viewed as the same if one catches with some depth. Either way you look at it it’s a problem.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #74716

    it scares the crap out of me when i see a hs kid with that type of posture while squatting. worse yet is when no one else makes an effort to correct it. Carl … what would you do with this young man to help him? i usually have them grab a med ball and perform overhead squats with emphasis on keeping weight on heels and off the toes.

    It takes time time and loading. I like overhead actions and olympic style deadlift exercies. The ball is too light to make an impact. I don’t coach by just bar speed and weight but by form of the spine. Bonsi trees take years to form so posture needs time as well. Muscles testing and function is a great start to help unwind bad postures.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #74797

    [quote author="mr glove" date="1228175964"]One thing’s for sure, the person who taught this kid clearly sucks. I bet this kid probably does olympic lifts, too!

    The picture is of an olympic lift, the clean if I am not mistaken.[/quote]

    I read too fast and thought it was a front squat…either way, it stinks.

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