Developing Muscular Strength

Posted In: The Classics

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    Jay Turner on #9324

    When attempting to increase muscular strength, can you do Max. Strength lifts year round, or do you have to start off with high reps/low intensity before you progress to max. strength lifts?

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    QUIKAZHELL on #28414

    For a track athlete doing max strength yr round would not be smart due to stress on the cns while trying to peak. But if one was tkaing the yr off from competing and wanted to just work on max strength then yes. With the proper loading/unloading one can stay in a max strength phase yr round.

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    Jay Turner on #28415

    So basically, the best method for a sprinter would be to start off with high reps/low intensity, then gradually move up to low reps/high intensity, correct?

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    400stud on #28416

    yup…short-to-long

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    Jay Turner on #28417

    Well how does this setup look. . . .

    4 x 12 @ 50%
    4 x 10 @ 60%
    4 x 10 @ 70%
    3 x 8 @ 80%
    3 x 5 @ 85%
    3 x 3 @ 90%
    4 x 2 @ 95%
    testing

    I plan on starting this in the fall. I have two ways I could go about this.

    Plan A. – I could start in the fall, progress to 95% by the end of fall, then start over in January with the lower intensity and re-work my way up in intensity, achieving max. intensity by the end of outdoor season. (two peaks – end of fall and end of outdoor)

    Plan B – I could start in the fall, SLOWLY progress in intensity, not reaching max. intensity (95% or above) until the end of outdoor (one peak – end of outdoor only).

    Which one would be more effective for a sprinter?

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    Derrick Brito on #28418

    id say double peak. with one conitnuos cycle, it seems like you would be on the same percentage/rep range too long.

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    400stud on #28419

    I agree with Derrick.

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    Derrick Brito on #28420

    and if you hadnt thought of these things already, ill add them.

    the first cycle i think should be longer than the second, and there isnt a need to start back at 50% unless youre taking a big break from lifting, which i wouldnt recomend anyways. but if theyre just taking winter break off or something, then starting again at around 70% would be better imo.

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    Jay Turner on #28421

    I understand all of your opinions. But before I say I agree with you all, are you guys considering that I am only peaking once for running (no indoor peak)?

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    dma1973 on #28422

    If you are going to do a maximum strength phase (3 to 6 reps @80-90%). You can only really handle a maximum of 6 weeks continuous cycle or 3 on:1 off:3 on cycle.

    I tend to have 2 to 3 strength cycles in the year even when I am peaking once a year.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #28423

    [i]Originally posted by DaGovernor[/i]
    So basically, the best method for a sprinter would be to start off with high reps/low intensity, then gradually move up to low reps/high intensity, correct?

    Not really. I don't really think that high rep protocols have much of a place in a power athletes training…..even in GPP. There are better ways around this issue. Instead of doing 4 x 12 @ 50% why not something like 8 x 6 @ 65%. The volume would be the same, the intensity would actually be high enough to yield some strength gains and the the set-rep scheme would be better for safety and speed of movement (if you chose to emphasize this).

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #28424

    [i]Originally posted by DaGovernor[/i]
    Well how does this setup look. . . .

    4 x 12 @ 50%
    4 x 10 @ 60%
    4 x 10 @ 70%
    3 x 8 @ 80%
    3 x 5 @ 85%
    3 x 3 @ 90%
    4 x 2 @ 95%
    testing

    I think the first 4 cycles would be a waste of time. Unless you are starting with extremely low fitness I don't think you need all that low intensity work.

    I plan on starting this in the fall. I have two ways I could go about this.

    Plan A. – I could start in the fall, progress to 95% by the end of fall, then start over in January with the lower intensity and re-work my way up in intensity, achieving max. intensity by the end of outdoor season. (two peaks – end of fall and end of outdoor)

    Plan B – I could start in the fall, SLOWLY progress in intensity, not reaching max. intensity (95% or above) until the end of outdoor (one peak – end of outdoor only).

    Which one would be more effective for a sprinter?

    I think a double peak would be better even if you're not intending on competing indoors. I'm not a big fan of the long slow increases in intensity. I think the drastic change in training that occurs after the first peak provides a nice foundation for future gains in the second peaking cycle.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    Jay Turner on #28425

    [i]Originally posted by mike[/i]
    [quote][i]Originally posted by DaGovernor[/i]
    Well how does this setup look. . . .

    4 x 12 @ 50%
    4 x 10 @ 60%
    4 x 10 @ 70%
    3 x 8 @ 80%
    3 x 5 @ 85%
    3 x 3 @ 90%
    4 x 2 @ 95%
    testing

    I think the first 4 cycles would be a waste of time. Unless you are starting with extremely low fitness I don't think you need all that low intensity work.

    I plan on starting this in the fall. I have two ways I could go about this.

    Plan A. – I could start in the fall, progress to 95% by the end of fall, then start over in January with the lower intensity and re-work my way up in intensity, achieving max. intensity by the end of outdoor season. (two peaks – end of fall and end of outdoor)

    Plan B – I could start in the fall, SLOWLY progress in intensity, not reaching max. intensity (95% or above) until the end of outdoor (one peak – end of outdoor only).

    Which one would be more effective for a sprinter?

    I think a double peak would be better even if you're not intending on competing indoors. I'm not a big fan of the long slow increases in intensity. I think the drastic change in training that occurs after the first peak provides a nice foundation for future gains in the second peaking cycle. [/quote]Ok, well then wouldn't the setup I proposed make even better sense to do in the off season? They'll be training over the summer as well so by the time we start lifting in the fall, they'll be have good fitness. However, wouldn't they still need that low intensity work with the weights?

    If you still think it is unnecessary, could you propose a setup for me?

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    delldell on #28426

    Post the kids #'s, training age, etc. or else it's hard to say if they need to be doing AA (higher reps).

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    Jay Turner on #28427

    [i]Originally posted by delldell[/i]
    Post the kids #'s, training age, etc. or else it's hard to say if they need to be doing AA (higher reps).

    Athlete 1 – second season of track (soph.); 100m: 13.42, 200m: 26.50 Bench: 130 Squat: 250

    Athlete 2 – first season of track (frosh.); 100m: 13.80, 200m: 27.50 Bench: 100 Squat: 210

    Athlete 3 – first season of track (frosh.); 100m: 13.22, 200m: 27.00 Bench: 85 Squat: 200

    All the other athletes are freshman who didn't get to lift weight this season because it was too time consuming to teach them how. So I had them do general strength exercises.

    Thoughts?

    And do you need anymore info?

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