Detraining Timeframes

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  • Mike Young
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    Mike Young on #17484

    The principle of reversibility of training (detraining) states that gains from training will be lost if training volume, intensity, or frequency is reduced too dramatically or stopped completely. While still believe that the overwhelming bulk of conditioning is done during the off-season, this practice is out-dated and ensures that fitness and physical capacity are at their lowest at the time when

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    ELITETRACK Founder

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    bap0022587 on #107192

    Mike, when you state that the practice of doing the bulk of conditioning in the off-season is outdated, are you saying that towards championship/peaking time that we want to keep at least volume, frequency, or intensity high and not deload the athlete completely to hit a big mark at the end of the season?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #107193

    Nope…just suggesting that to get better you need to train and many people lose sight of the fact that in our sport the early season competitions mean little to nothing so attempting to have drastic reductions in training (think of the coach who uses block periodization or drops all weight training in-season) is short sighted.

    There should be a gradual unloading and intensification over the entire macrocycle.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    star61 on #107194

    Nope…just suggesting that to get better you need to train and many people lose sight of the fact that in our sport the early season competitions mean little to nothing so attempting to have drastic reductions in training (think of the coach who uses block periodization or drops all weight training in-season) is short sighted.

    There should be a gradual unloading and intensification over the entire macrocycle.

    Are you saying you’re against block training? If so, does that include all phases of training?

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    bap0022587 on #107195

    Alright that’s what I had assumed, I just wanted to make sure I understood correctly. That statement just threw me off a bit.

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    burkhalter on #107196

    Nope…just suggesting that to get better you need to train and many people lose sight of the fact that in our sport the early season competitions mean little to nothing so attempting to have drastic reductions in training (think of the coach who uses block periodization or drops all weight training in-season) is short sighted.

    There should be a gradual unloading and intensification over the entire macrocycle.

    I remember Boo saying that the highest volume is pretty much week one and he gradually drops the volume while upping the intensity over time.

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    Kristofer Lam on #107197

    Very interesting post for me granted i have just taken my cast off after a long 2 months of inactivity. If one month of no weight training can result in a loss of 30% of muscular strength then i’m in for a hell of a shock when i hit the weight room again Monday.

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    Isaiah Miller on #107200

    oh wow so how is proper recovery addressed with this?

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    Derrick Brito on #107204

    Very interesting post for me granted i have just taken my cast off after a long 2 months of inactivity. If one month of no weight training can result in a loss of 30% of muscular strength then i’m in for a hell of a shock when i hit the weight room again Monday.

    Like he said, it depends on the athlete’s training history and physiology. I never lose 30% strength despite sometimes going months without training. It really depends.

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    Mccabe on #107205

    Remember these values are on the assumption the individual adopts a pretty much sedentary lifestyle. In my experience, a lot comes down to Psychology. If you let a week off training bother you then it will affect you more than if you don’t let it bother you.

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    Zach Batcho on #107217

    How long does it take to get back in shape after detraining for two months? I lost 25-30% on my strength levels for sure.

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    comando-joe on #107219

    Sounds exaggerated. I had 2 months off after surgery and didnt lose any more than 10%, and was getting pb’s within 6 weeks back.

    30% from my squat is nearly 70kg, thats a lot to lose in such small time.

    Nick Newman
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    Nick Newman on #107220

    Everyone is different.

    When someone has a high level of strength training experience, has very high strength levels and has been at those strength levels for a long time…the strength loss during 1-2 months of nothing will be much lower than in someone with opposite characteristics…

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #107222

    When there’s a long strength training history I’ve found that about 90+% of strength can be retained for up to 6 weeks with no resistance based strength training at all IF the athlete is doing activities that provide a crossover stimuli…plyos, sprinting, etc. 90% is still a 10% reduction though which I’d rather not see.

    On rare occasions, I’ve seen athletes hold on to strength 100% of strength with no strength training for 2-3 weeks as long as they’re doing plyos.

    The general timelines are for total cessation of training. Not just cessation in one area of training.

    ELITETRACK Founder

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #107233

    Any research pdfs? Some of this needs context so people are thinking they are going to die in a taper……Please post them if you got them. Great blog post but citations would be a plus!

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