Density and Intensity- Relationships and Regeneration

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #18001

    Density seems to get very little love in programming, perhaps because it’s harder to visualize on paper or study in training. Most overtraining problems are from micro to macro errors in distributing the quality of work and rest. I have only made those errors recently because I didn’t flirt with reduced rest periods very much until about 5 years ago, because I followed a classic recovery interva

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    Anthony Wallace on #112694

    Carl I like this blog bc i know i have fallen into this group the last 3 years. I have started getting injuries bc of overtraining and not taking the proper rest. I think im going to try that 6 days as oppose to the 5 I am currently in. I would become flat come June and I am working on beating that trend.I have pushed my open date back to Feb 26 because i want to be fresh come March and not be beat up after the indoor season. I have had some foot injuries of late and i have been resting now 6wks, ie I have not been in spikes for 6 wks or done any long jumping. I have started doing more exspolsive things to get my body ready and I have been doing really well in the weightroom and in the pool. Thanks alot for this article because now I can rethink my plan for this season to make sure i am recoverying proplery from my intense days and competition. Im 31 and will be 32 come 12/24 and have been in this sport since 11. Again Thanks alot

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    Matt Norquist on #112700

    Carl,

    What do you think of using number of sessions as the best way to up overall density? IE – If I could design ideal training set up for myself (or other people with work/school commitments for most of the daylight hours) I would do 2 sessions every day, 6x a week while in a high density block:

    Monday: AM Track PM Weights
    Tuesday: AM Tempo PM GS
    Wednesday: AM Track PM Weights
    Thurs: AM Tempo PM Tech
    Friday: AM Weights and Accel
    Saturday: Tech and Speed
    Sunday Off

    Then in season drop 1 lifting session and make Recovery days single sessions.

    That’s ideal – which many of us (Self included) can’t do often. The other way I like to increase density is by messing with recovery (Esp on Cleans and accel runs – less on squats), using complexes frequently (both on track and in weight room), including some extra sub-max reps on running, and incorporating technique and some plyo work into end of warm-up routines. This all bc I have (at max) a 60-100 minute training window on any given day.

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    star61 on #112712

    With regards to increasing intensity in phase 2 and then density in phase 3. Are you assuming density and work capacity in the weight room is going to transfer into work capacity on the track? My understanding is that work capacity or endurance in the gym translates poorly to work capacity or endurance on the track. If you are not expecting a transfer to the track, why doesn’t density come earlier, like the end of phase 1 or the beginning of phase 2, to allow for an increase in intensity and/or volume in the gym during phase 3? I would think that doing so would allow better gains of both strength and power prior to going into SPP.

    In most planning for a weightlifter, density would come earlier to increase work capacity for the higher intensties and volumes to come. Are others using density in the gym as a way of improving work capacity on the track?

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    Josh Hurlebaus on #112713

    Endurance and work capacity are two different things in my book. Endurance is too broad of a term whereas work capacity is specific to the chemical processes you are trying to develop for your event. In that regard, I use density work early on as a means to increase specificity without over working myself on hill sprints. I’ll also revisit it in SPP after my accel phase has finished as a means of further deepening the resource pool.

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    star61 on #112718

    Endurance and work capacity are two different things in my book. Endurance is too broad of a term whereas work capacity is specific to the chemical processes you are trying to develop for your event. In that regard, I use density work early on as a means to increase specificity without over working myself on hill sprints. I’ll also revisit it in SPP after my accel phase has finished as a means of further deepening the resource pool.

    Thanks for the response.

    When you say you use density work, do you mean density work in the gym? In other words, if you increase density in squats, cleans etc., do you have a head start as far as work capacity related specific to running hills?

    And since you mentioned it, if we’re limiting the exercises to gym work and short hills, how does endurance differ from work capacity, in your view? In other words, can you develop good endurance for running hills and still have poor work capacity and vice versa?

    Thanks…

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #112726

    Carl I like this blog bc i know i have fallen into this group the last 3 years. I have started getting injuries bc of overtraining and not taking the proper rest. I think im going to try that 6 days as oppose to the 5 I am currently in. I would become flat come June and I am working on beating that trend.I have pushed my open date back to Feb 26 because i want to be fresh come March and not be beat up after the indoor season. I have had some foot injuries of late and i have been resting now 6wks, ie I have not been in spikes for 6 wks or done any long jumping. I have started doing more exspolsive things to get my body ready and I have been doing really well in the weightroom and in the pool. Thanks alot for this article because now I can rethink my plan for this season to make sure i am recoverying proplery from my intense days and competition. Im 31 and will be 32 come 12/24 and have been in this sport since 11. Again Thanks alot

    Spreading out the work is always better than jamming it in. So many times I see people get fried because they simply dug themselves into a hole during the fall and never go out of it.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #112727

    Carl,

    What do you think of using number of sessions as the best way to up overall density? IE – If I could design ideal training set up for myself (or other people with work/school commitments for most of the daylight hours) I would do 2 sessions every day, 6x a week while in a high density block:

    Monday: AM Track PM Weights
    Tuesday: AM Tempo PM GS
    Wednesday: AM Track PM Weights
    Thurs: AM Tempo PM Tech
    Friday: AM Weights and Accel
    Saturday: Tech and Speed
    Sunday Off

    Then in season drop 1 lifting session and make Recovery days single sessions.

    That’s ideal – which many of us (Self included) can’t do often. The other way I like to increase density is by messing with recovery (Esp on Cleans and accel runs – less on squats), using complexes frequently (both on track and in weight room), including some extra sub-max reps on running, and incorporating technique and some plyo work into end of warm-up routines. This all bc I have (at max) a 60-100 minute training window on any given day.

    Hard to say, but warm-ups are needed and I am not a fan of any workout with speed in 60 minutes. With school or work it’s tough to do doubles without getting tired or dealing with travel. I have seen the Friday to Wednesday approach with double one the weekend and a day off on Thursday fit for some people but the best thing to check is fatigue and times/distances!

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #112728

    With regards to increasing intensity in phase 2 and then density in phase 3. Are you assuming density and work capacity in the weight room is going to transfer into work capacity on the track? My understanding is that work capacity or endurance in the gym translates poorly to work capacity or endurance on the track. If you are not expecting a transfer to the track, why doesn’t density come earlier, like the end of phase 1 or the beginning of phase 2, to allow for an increase in intensity and/or volume in the gym during phase 3? I would think that doing so would allow better gains of both strength and power prior to going into SPP.

    In most planning for a weightlifter, density would come earlier to increase work capacity for the higher intensties and volumes to come. Are others using density in the gym as a way of improving work capacity on the track?

    Acceleration and work capacity from repeat bursts of olympic lifts have worked for years with me, but nothing else has transferred because of length or speed. For example a circuit may help athletes recover between sessions but not reps in Speed Endurance. I have not seen faster or more consistent fly times with any modality. Acceleration does seem to have a relationships with doing doubles with the olympic lifts.

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    oshikake@ymail.com on #112732

    .

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    Anthony Wallace on #112736

    THANKS ALOT CARL!

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #112741

    Nice post Carl. You mentioned three things you learned the hard way and talked a bit about each:

    1. Building up gradually, first through volume, then intensity, and also spreading out the work?

    2. SPP is typically faster speeds which demand greater recovery so don’t use density here?

    3. Nothing wrong with some low intensity work, which could be more dense, during comp?

    Is my interpretation accurate?

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #112756

    Nice post Carl. You mentioned three things you learned the hard way and talked a bit about each:

    1. Building up gradually, first through volume, then intensity, and also spreading out the work?

    2. SPP is typically faster speeds which demand greater recovery so don’t use density here?

    3. Nothing wrong with some low intensity work, which could be more dense, during comp?

    Is my interpretation accurate?

    1. Build up gradually, increase intensity, add density if needed, and spread the same or more volume out to allow recovery.

    2. Gary Winckler said that the SPP things got tricky in one of his seminars and this the hardest because meets provide a governor of volume because of the feedback of competition times and the need for rest. I use capacity work with acceleration but nothing else unless I am a long sprinter, something I have less experience with so I don’t know.

    3. Tempo should be called Templow, as low intensity work includes everything from walking in the water all the way to light circuit weights. I don’t increase density of anything during comp phases unless it’s a pool workout or bike routine for rehab (long sprinter).

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    Josh Hurlebaus on #112760

    [quote author="Josh Hurlebaus" date="1322557050"]Endurance and work capacity are two different things in my book. Endurance is too broad of a term whereas work capacity is specific to the chemical processes you are trying to develop for your event. In that regard, I use density work early on as a means to increase specificity without over working myself on hill sprints. I’ll also revisit it in SPP after my accel phase has finished as a means of further deepening the resource pool.

    Thanks for the response.

    When you say you use density work, do you mean density work in the gym? In other words, if you increase density in squats, cleans etc., do you have a head start as far as work capacity related specific to running hills?

    And since you mentioned it, if we’re limiting the exercises to gym work and short hills, how does endurance differ from work capacity, in your view? In other words, can you develop good endurance for running hills and still have poor work capacity and vice versa?

    Thanks…[/quote]

    The density work I do is with squats. Density and volume starts high for squats and low for hill sprints and by week 6 they’ve switched places. I start the hills and density squat work at the same time in GPP. I don’t limit the density work to just times when short hills are being run, but they do match up quite well so that was thee example I gave. The squats seem to definitely yield better work capacity for hill sprints but I’ve never noticed hill sprints increasing work capacity in the gym, at least not to the same degree as the opposite.

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