Dangerous Deforming Dorsiflexion Directions

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  • Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #14643

    Mobility is the trendy item of the moment and it looks like the usual suspects of sports performance are at it again at your expense. In efforts to stay cutting edge they share new progressions, foreign exercises stolen from PT, misinterpretation of basic research, or unfortunately original moronic epiphanies. The prime example is dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. Well people the foot has over 30 j

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    mortac8 on #73148

    Mobility is the trendy item of the moment and it looks like the usual suspects of sports performance are at it again at your expense. In efforts to stay cutting edge they share new progressions, foreign exercises stolen from PT, misinterpretation of basic research, or unfortunately original moronic epiphanies. The prime example is dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. Well people the foot has over 30 j

    Continue reading…

    Carl,

    I have enjoyed your recent barrage of posts & blogs. However, I am not grasping what you are trying to go after in this blog. This video seems like a fairly conservative and simple “protocol” that can be applied usefully by the target audience. Not to get snippy, but shouldn’t you be blasting something a little more glaring like DeFranco’s video where he instructs young athletes to jam a theracane into their psoas?

    as girls in the Camron video would say, “get em daddy”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHss4GvP4Fs
    i can hear it now “mooooommmmmmm, i punctured my aorta doing Joe’s stretches”

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #72736

    That’s the point Mort, People are dong self help for PT. What’s next?

    I can’t look at what Joe does as we are talking about dorsiflexion and other methods don’t concern me. What does concern me is triplanar dance fever nonsense and meatheads grinding to get more dorsiflexion.

    CV

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    Participant
    Matt Gardner on #72637

    As a young coach I initially tried the closed chain “ankle drives” and “ankle breaker” mobs. The names are very appropriate as the forced motions at the ankle may achieve improvements in gross movement (dorsiflexion), but the ankle and foot are not just a simple hinge. Things may visually look good, but all the while dysfunctions at the small joints and articulations may remain unchanged, become deranged, and appropriate proportions of contribution altered.

    These “mobs” are often prescribed in team settings. In a pool of athletes, how many do you think you’ll find without a history of ankle sprain(s) (and all the direct and adaptedly altered patterns that follow) that possess a talus that rocks, rolls, and glides appropriately but just lacks gross dorsiflexion? Not to mention taking something that’s hypomobile, impacting it and grinding away at end range.

    Nick Newman
    Participant
    Nick Newman on #72389

    Carl,

    You have lots of time of your hands don’t you? 🙂

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    mortac8 on #72370

    Then if an athlete has slightly sub-optimal ankle mobility, what is the correct course of action? How do you determine when the issue is enough of an issue to seek out quality professional help and how do you know that professional help won’t turn out to be a Mike Robertson devotee?

    In my area, I have the 75 mile rule. I am unaware of any top tier therapists within 75 miles. There may be one but that’s $110/session.

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    mortac8 on #72356

    I will counter on this one a bit. One of my athletes has a history of foot/lower leg issues. To make a long story short we contacted the foot doctor (being intentionally vauge here) of a well know sprint coach who referred us to his successor as king of the hill. She went there and ended up with a nice bill and some thick-ass hard as concrete custom orthotics which barely fit into her running shoes and give her blisters when she runs.

    Just because you seek top professional help doesn’t always mean that you’ll get it.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #72350

    Mortac,

    You listened to someone and got a bad apple. This is why I read the research and choose the experts. If you are in the middle of eastern wyoming than leave. Don’t look for the seven cities of gold int he wrong location. Why seek out top level stuff in a crapy situation?

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #72313

    These “mobs” are often prescribed in team settings. In a pool of athletes, how many do you think you’ll find without a history of ankle sprain(s) (and all the direct and adaptedly altered patterns that follow) that possess a talus that rocks, rolls, and glides appropriately but just lacks gross dorsiflexion? Not to mention taking something that’s hypomobile, impacting it and grinding away at end range.

    Matt- great post.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #72190

    Then if an athlete has slightly sub-optimal ankle mobility, what is the correct course of action? How do you determine when the issue is enough of an issue to seek out quality professional help and how do you know that professional help won’t turn out to be a Mike Robertson devotee?

    In my area, I have the 75 mile rule. I am unaware of any top tier therapists within 75 miles. There may be one but that’s $110/session.

    Mort- I will post a response via new entry.

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    Participant
    Matt Gardner on #72079

    I will counter on this one a bit. One of my athletes has a history of foot/lower leg issues. To make a long story short we contacted the foot doctor (being intentionally vauge here) of a well know sprint coach who referred us to his successor as king of the hill. She went there and ended up with a nice bill and some thick-ass hard as concrete custom orthotics which barely fit into her running shoes and give her blisters when she runs.

    Just because you seek top professional help doesn’t always mean that you’ll get it.

    Fool me once… Simply put, for the issue you were dealing with they weren’t a top quality professional. Finding high quality sports med professionals is extremely difficult, especially in non-major metro or pro-market towns. You just have to find the best people you can and establish what roles they can fill. As you build the network you’ll sometimes get burned and learn.

    “For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.”

    The really sad and horribly frustrating part of having a clue with high level sports med stuff is often you’ll see situations where you have a pretty good idea what’s needed, but logistical and financial limitations prevent you from being able to do anything about it. As a high school coach I saw lots of stuff where I knew what needed to happen, but many of the kids came from backgrounds where there families barely had enough money to eat. We got creative where we could, but simply had to do the best we could with the tools available. Dealing with situational limitations is something I’m still learning to work with and something that often haunts me as a coach.

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