Coach puts excessive attention to stretching and flexibility

Posted In: Flexibility

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    Participant
    trackspeedboy on #15133

    Has us stretching during workouts both static and dynamic.
    I can touch the middle of my feet (sit and reach) with BOTH of my hands and can do every stretch comfortably and generally feel loose. I can kick up to above my head.
    Yet my coach continously comments on my tightness and how tis affecting my performance.

    Any thoughts?

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    Participant
    premium on #75188

    whens the static and whens the dynamics

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    Participant
    Mccabe on #75193

    I’d love to see what he would say about my flexibility if he thinks yours sucks!

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    Participant
    trackspeedboy on #75194

    He has us do a short bit of static stretching pre workout, meaning holding the stretch for a few seconds only. Then we go through all the drills and basically a dynamic warm up and all the dynamic stretches. Depending on the workout we’d also do static during the workout (tempo/circuits) but if going intensive tempo or faster then dynamic only throughout the workout. Static after and he says to stretch 60 mins a day because it is VERYYYYY important (his own words).

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    Participant
    premium on #75294

    i dont think its that bad…maybe overstretching can become a problem but a good amount of flexibility can make you faster, i do about 20mins dynamic, dynamic between sets and 10-15 mins static afterwards…pre workout static is probably not necessary…i don’t know if the dynamic stretches negate the effects…static stretch is more for relaxation and cooling down…so maybe you should keep the workout dynamic…you know your body…a good warmup will make a good workout and race

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #75331

    Have the athlete’s flexibility actually improved much from these routines. My observation has always been that ROM does not improve with standard static flexibility work beyond the first week or so. Similarly it rarely drops off much if at all when you stop stretching. With this in mind, what is he trying to accomplish with the stretching and is it achieving that goal? If not, that might be your best selling point on its worth (or worthlessness as the case may be).

    ELITETRACK Founder

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    Participant
    trackspeedboy on #75452

    Have the athlete’s flexibility actually improved much from these routines. My observation has always been that ROM does not improve with standard static flexibility work beyond the first week or so. Similarly it rarely drops off much if at all when you stop stretching. With this in mind, what is he trying to accomplish with the stretching and is it achieving that goal? If not, that might be your best selling point on its worth (or worthlessness as the case may be).

    So would increasing my ROM through other methods of flexibility development, actually improve performance or is it simply not needed?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #75456

    From the latest issue of JSR:

    Sit-and-Reach Flexibility and Running Economy of Men and Women Collegiate Distance Runners.

    Trehearn TL, Buresh RJ.

    1Department of Health and Human Performance, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, Nebraska; and 2Department of Health, Physical Education, and Sport Science, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia.

    Trehearn, TL and Buresh, RJ. Sit-and-reach flexibility and running economy of men and women collegiate distance runners. J Strength Cond Res 23(1): xxx-xxx, 2009-Flexibility has been controversially suggested as one of the biomechanical factors contributing to the variability observed in running economy among distance runners. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of the relationship between sit-and-reach flexibility and running economy in men and women. Eight collegiate distance runners (4 men and 4 women) served as subjects for this correlational study (age = 19.9 +/- 1.25 years; &OV0312;o2max = 63.2 +/- 3.4 ml.kg.min). Each subject’s flexibility was measured using the standard sit-and-reach test, and running economy was recorded during an incremental maximal treadmill test at both absolute (men = 241.2 m.min; women = 198.32 m.min) and relative (10-km pace) velocities. Statistical analyses indicated a significant relationship between sit-and-reach scores and running economy at an absolute velocity (r = 0.826, p </= 0.05), as well as a significant sex difference in sit-and-reach scores (p </= 0.05). The significant relationship demonstrates that the less flexible distance runners tended to be more economical, possibly as a result of the energy-efficient function of the elastic components in the muscles and tendons during the stretch-shortening cycle.

    Check out the research I've done on sprinters and jumpers that's in the article directory. Basically this effect spans all running speeds.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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