Catapulting the Shark?

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #18901

    “Piggybacking off Catapult’s experience with dozens of football programs around the world, the goalkeeping algorithm will be the first of many specified approaches to performance analysis on the cards in the coming months- with specific algorithms for Australian Rules football kicking, American football quarterback movements, and baseball pitchers all in early development.”-Catapult SportsB

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    eroszag on #120008

    There is another problem; data reliability with GPS.
    I,ve never questioned the results of GPS tracking, until a Rugby League Fitness coach posted in an Australian Newspaper that a certain player can reach 41,4 km/h during a game…now, It seems a pretty high speed..after seeing some footage of that guy, looks fast, but maybe a 10.8 fast…so I did a little research.
    GPS can be very accurate, but only if the target do not move!
    A research I came across showed the following errors, in a measured track of 200m:( distance measured by the GPS device)
    Walking, about perfect, 199.8 meters..light Jogging , about 196, running 20km/h about 190…and..sprinting, 180.something meters! So a 10% error…plus, they warned that in curvilinear movements, errors increased.
    So, GPS precious to monitor total distance and so..but not so reliable judging running speed.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #120037

    There is another problem; data reliability with GPS.
    I,ve never questioned the results of GPS tracking, until a Rugby League Fitness coach posted in an Australian Newspaper that a certain player can reach 41,4 km/h during a game…now, It seems a pretty high speed..after seeing some footage of that guy, looks fast, but maybe a 10.8 fast…so I did a little research.
    GPS can be very accurate, but only if the target do not move!
    A research I came across showed the following errors, in a measured track of 200m:( distance measured by the GPS device)
    Walking, about perfect, 199.8 meters..light Jogging , about 196, running 20km/h about 190…and..sprinting, 180.something meters! So a 10% error…plus, they warned that in curvilinear movements, errors increased.
    So, GPS precious to monitor total distance and so..but not so reliable judging running speed.

    As the technology improves, so will the accuracy. The problem I have is that it’s still your body speed, not limb mechanics and internal loading. GPS does have value with estimation of loading, but little else. It is not sensitive to see if one’s going to pull a hamstring because of the sensors can detect air times and algorithms are there to crack the code.

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