Baxter’s The Foot and Ankle in Sport

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  • Carl Valle
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    Carl Valle on #17196

    Not a cheap text by any means, this resource is a good start for professionals trying to understand foot function in sport. David A. Porter MD PhD and Lew C. Schon MD lead the path into foot anatomy and care. Often many sports medicine professionals do wonderful evaluations on joints and muscle groups using a conventional approach. This muscle is short, that muscle is weak, this joint is restricte

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    docjohn on #103913

    its on my short list

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    Matt Gardner on #103923

    Got this in June. Very strong book. Case studies in the book are awesome as they show clinical evaluations and interventions specific to a case and provide a history of what was done and what did or did not work.

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #103938

    Coaches and trainers understanding foot function in sport sounds good. Knowing when to outsource to a highly qualified professional sounds even better.

    I think it’s great to have a better understanding but knowing where to draw the line is important. When I cruise the net and see various blogs, posts, and thoughts, I reach the conclusion that many are trying to be a cardiologist, podiatrist, chiropractor, massage therapist, nutritionist, olympic weightlifting expert, and world class sprint coach all rolled into one…before the age of 30!

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #103939

    Mr.Glove,

    Yet when you don’t have a network yourself, what are we suppose to take out of that? Outsource is great but lately I have found that playing track coach is knowing a lot about everything.

    Sometimes outsourcing is reactive vs proactive.

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    Matt Gardner on #103940

    Referring out is great. Referring to the right people and having the right people to refer to is the key. In many situations that’s what this is about. The quality of sports medicine varies immensely just as the quality of knowledge and service does in any field. Knowing when you need help and whom are the best practioner(s) to provide help for the situation is difficult (balance quality, logistical, locational, financial, etc..). How do you know when to refer out and where to refer if you have no familiarity of what you’re dealing with?

    Even with sports medicine support, the best solutions support accurate sports medicine interventions. While sports med can provide guidance for training that’s not their area of expertise. Your ability to understand their end of the world greatly effects your ability to support there efforts in the time the athlete is with you (you can’t be on the same page if you can’t read) and bridging the gap to full function.

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #103943

    Monster Post Matt- We don’t need to be experts, but better shoppers. After 10 years then what? Books like this are great to put on the top but we are not seeing more fundamental books first.

    CV

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    Rich Tolman(mr-glove) on #103965

    Haven’t had much of a need to establish a network other than a decent chiro/ART guy or massage therapist.

    Both of your posts are great and perhaps mine was misunderstood. My comments were aimed more at those who try to fix people despite not having the requisite education or training to do so. I believe Carl referred to it as a God complex. A client of mine likes the term savior complex.

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