Accurately Measuring a Time Test with Freelap

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    Christopher Glaeser on #17577

    Testing a sprinter’s progress during training is often done by precisely measuring the time to sprint specific distances. However, some tests are performed by precisely measuring the distance an athlete can run in a specific time. An example of such a test is the 25 second test, which measures the distance an athlete can sprint in 25 seconds. This article describes how to precisely measure that distance using Freelap.

    See Accurately Measuring a Time Test with Freelap

    Best,
    Christopher

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    griff on #108499

    Hi Christopher,
    Contact me re – supply of freelap system to Ireland.

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    Participant
    Christopher Glaeser on #108516

    Contact me re – supply of freelap system to Ireland.

    Hi Tomas,

    Yes, the Freelap distributor in Ireland is:

    Loki Sports Ltd c/o Trade Wins
    Mr. John Shields
    Airport Business Campus, Santry
    IR-9 Dublin

    Let me know if you have questions or need further assistance.

    Best,
    Christopher

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    Albert Naugle Gudiño on #113492

    I recently purchased and received my freelap system yesterday. I couldn’t wait to use it so
    yesterday afternoon was my first session with the system and it felt great. love the feedback.

    I want to be as accurate as possible and was wondering if you could illustrate (in words)
    the proper way to capture times from a block start position with the stopwatch attached at waist?

    the reason I ask is that in my first training session I was getting times that seemed too good to be true.
    I want to make sure I’m doing it as correctly as possible and I can’t find any articles on sensor placement
    on the freelap site. (i.e. placing the sensor vertical or horizontal, countdown method vs transmitter start)

    any help would be greatly appreciated.

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    griff on #113493

    If you are starting off the touchpad, then you have to set up the sensor you are running to, 80cm after the point you wish to measure to, as the sensors operate off a magnetic field the watch picks up the sensor 80 cm out.
    So if you are measuring a 30m from blocks and are starting off a touchpad, and you have the sensor down at the 30meter line , then you are measureing 29.20 meters, so set up the sensor at 30.8 meters to get exactly 30 meters. This is the only flaw with the freelap.
    This only applies to starts from the touchpad.

    If you are measuring flys, then you dont need to adjust for the 80cm, as you will be using a sensor to a sensor.

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    Albert Naugle Gudiño on #113498

    got it. I’m using just the 2 junior sensors and stopwatch. I was using the countdown method on the stopwatch to start the run, is there an accurate way of measuring using the 2 sensors for both the start and end of the run? where would I place the starting sensor for example?

    I understand that it picks up the signal 80cm “early” and thus measuring flys it accounts for that distance but how can I get an accurate reading from a dead start without using the countdown method?

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    Participant
    Christopher Glaeser on #113499

    As Tomas has noted, the TX Junior transmitter (sometimes referred to as a candlestick) generates a magnetic field that is 80 cm in radius. It is the outer edge of this magnetic field that triggers the watch. If you want to time a 20 meter acceleration using the TX Touch pad for the start and a TX Junior for the finish, the TX Junior should be placed at 20.8 meters from the TX Touch, and this will put the outer edge of the magnetic field at the desired 20 meters.

    When I’m doing my setups for accelerations, I typically don’t move anything for the 80 cm, but instead just ensure the setups are always consistent. As long as the setups are consistent and you are aware of the 80 cm, the collected data will have meaning over time. I’m looking for improvements week over week. (One exception is when I’m setting up the football combine 40 yard dash. In that case, I do want 40 yards (and a 10 yard split), so I do place the trigger points at 10 and 40 yards.)

    As Tomas has noted, when performing fly work (fly sprints, hurdle splits, bounds, sled pulls, long/triple jump velocity at the toe board, etc) using two TX Juniors, you do not need to account for the 80 cm because both transmitters will trigger the watch at the same 80 cm offset. The same is true when using multiple TX Juniors to get a series of splits. So, for fly-in work, just set the TX Juniors at the distance you want to measure.

    When using two TX Juniors for standing starts with a short fly-in, I recommend 2 meters between the athlete and the transmitter at the start. This will put 1.2 meters between the athlete and the trigger point. Long/triple jumpers may use other short fly-in distances as well, perhaps based on steps. Once you find fly-in distances that fit your training, a consistent setup will generate data that will have meaning when compared week to week and month to month.

    Different coaches will prefer different setups, but for my setups, I almost always use the marks on the track, including the women’s hurdle marks, 300/400 hurdle marks, and 400 relay zone marks. For example, the women’s hurdle marks are 8.5 meters, and two of them is an easy setup for a 17 meter fly, and four is a 34 meter fly. One of the benefits of being a software geek is I have written my own iPhone conversion applications using speed decrement exponential curve fitting, so I can convert a 34 meter fly to a 30 meter fly based on an athlete’s speed decrement curve without having to bother with a tape measure. That said, as long as you keep detail records and are consistent, any approach will work fine. Some coaches have decades of records based on certain distances, and they will continue to use those distances for obvious reasons. I think Carl Valle uses tape marks for easy setup. Any consistent approach will work fine.

    Regarding hurdle setup, I have continuing discussions with Brooks Johnson, Randy Gillon, David Hegland, and Carl Valle about best practices. I think the consensus is to place the TX Junior somewhere between 2 and 5 meters beyond each hurdle. This will ensure that the hips (and watch) are at a consistent sprinting height from the ground. In addition, moving the TX Junior back from the hurdle will avoid getting hit from a falling hurdle. (Note: The TX Juniors will work fine when placed under plastic cones. When I have 230 high school kids on the track and two lacrosse teams on the field, I place my TX Juniors under 18″ orange cones. The magnetic field continues to work just fine, and no one steps on or drops a hurdle on my equipment)

    You may have noticed the base of the TX Junior can hold the transmitter either vertically or horizontally. For best accuracy in sprints, the TX Junior should be mounted vertically with the on/off switch in the base. The reason for the horizontal position is for other sports such as MTB (downhill mountain biking) and BMX. In cycle sports, the watch is commonly mounted on the handle bars with the face of the watch pointing up, which is best aligned with the TX Junior mounted horizontally. In sprints, with the watch on the hip facing towards the side, the TX Junior should be mounted vertically.

    New users often ask about the timing of the beep when the watch is triggered. The beep will begin the instant the watch is triggered, but the beep is quite long relative to the trigger point, perhaps on the order of a couple tenths. So, when sprinting at 10 m/s the ear may perceive the beep occurs after the transmitter, even though the beep began at the trigger point, 80 cm before the transmitter.

    Best,
    Christopher

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    Christopher Glaeser on #113500

    got it. I’m using just the 2 junior sensors and stopwatch. I was using the countdown method on the stopwatch to start the run, is there an accurate way of measuring using the 2 sensors for both the start and end of the run? where would I place the starting sensor for example?

    Good question. A watch and two TX Junior transmitters is the most common Freelap training kit, and can be used for various types of speed training setups. For example, suppose you want to measure a 30 meter fly with a 40 meter fly-in. Let’s assume you plan to run in lane 1. Place each of the two junior transmitters on the line between lanes 1 and 2, with a 30 meter spacing between the two transmitters. The transmitters should be vertical in the base, with the on/off switch at the bottom.

    Position the athlete 40 meters from the first transmitter. The watch should be on the right hip, facing lane 2. The watch is normally in the Date/Time mode. Press the Mode button (lower left) once to enter Chrono mode. The watch will blink a number at the bottom that indicates the amount of remaining storage (the watch will hold 765 splits, and this number will decrease as the watch collects more data). Then, the watch will blink all zeros. The watch is now in Chrono mode, and ready to begin collecting times. When the athlete runs the sprint, the watch will beep as it passes each junior. When it passes the second junior, the watch will have recorded the time between the two juniors. That is the 30 meter fly time. There is more information at Freelap Setup that discusses the button sequence.

    Of course, you can vary the distance between the two junior transmitters, as well as the fly-in distance. If you want to measure accelerations using two juniors, you can use a fly-in distance as short as about 2 meters.

    Best,
    Christopher

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    Albert Naugle Gudiño on #113501

    excellent, thank you both for your help. The system is great, thumbs up

    Carl Valle
    Participant
    Carl Valle on #113502

    I am using it tonight to get hurdle splits…..keep in mind the times never include reaction time and many athletes do great execution wise when they don’t have to wait for the gun.

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