2008 Olympics: Sports that should not be in the Olympics

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      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #14760

        I’ve been trying to catch as much of the Olympics as possible. One of the things I’m noticing is the complete and total commercialization of the games. This has trickled down to affecting the very sports that are contested. It’s actually as if NBC is hand choosing the time of the competitive schedule and the sports to be TV friendly for the American viewing public. I would like to petition from

        Continue reading…

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        Chad Williams on #71418

        I came across this

        while perusing youtube this morning. At least this “sport” everyone could practice with just 10 cups. The kid has some quick hands though.

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        premium on #71421

        i see hes using the regulation cups…..

        i don’t know if you’d consider beach volleyball less competitive than indoor….

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #71422

        i don’t know if you’d consider beach volleyball less competitive than indoor….

        Really? Everyone who’s good comes from SoCal (where the sport was invented and the central place in the world it is played at a professional / elite level).

        ELITETRACK Founder

      • Nick Newman
        Participant
        Nick Newman on #71448

        If rifle shooting is an Olympic sport, why isnt darts? ? ? and if darts was, Phil Taylor would be the greatest olympian ever…just check the guys darts stats…

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #71453

        If rifle shooting is an Olympic sport, why isnt darts? ? ? and if darts was, Phil Taylor would be the greatest olympian ever…just check the guys darts stats…

        Maybe it’s because of the opposite affects of alcohol on performance in the 2 events. With shooting, the more you drink the worse you get. With darts, the more you drink the better you get!

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        ex400 on #71459

        Two sports that should not be in the Olympics are baseball and men’s soccer. In both cases, the top performers in the sport are prevented from being in the Olympics, so what is the point of having them?

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #71490

        Two sports that should not be in the Olympics are baseball and men’s soccer. In both cases, the top performers in the sport are prevented from being in the Olympics, so what is the point of having them?

        This could actually be said for quite a few sports…basketball with the exception of the this year and the original dream team didn’t have all the best players out. Hockey never does. Heck even track sometimes leaves home some of the best…Dan O’Brien, any number of Kenyans who don’t get selected but are reigning World Champs, etc.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        ex400 on #71500

        Mike, you miss the point. Of course there are always individual athletes who for one reason or another do not participate. But in baseball and men’s soccer, the best players are institutionally PREVENTED from playing, in the one case by MLB and in the other, by FIFA. I was only thinking of summer Olympics, so hadn’t thought of hockey.

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        Daniel Andrews on #71528

        baseball shouldn’t be in the Olympics because the best players are juiced. When your sport has a bigger doping problem than track and cycling ever did it’s time to keep it out of the Olympics. Men’s soccer has rules that allow for great players to participate, but it’s rules are to prevent what’s happened in basketball and provide younger players an opportunity on national teams to further the sports development.

        Is baseball a sport anyways?

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        ex400 on #71531

        If you seriously think that the soccer rules are “to prevent what’s happened in basketball and provide younger players an opportunity on national teams to further the sport’s development,” then you do not understand sport, economics and business. The rules were forced upon IOC by FIFA in order to do just the opposite of what you suggest. The rules are designed to protect and defend the greatest and most lucrative franchise in all of sport – the World Cup. FIFA will let nothing come close to competing with that.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #71540

        If you seriously think that the soccer rules are “to prevent what’s happened in basketball and provide younger players an opportunity on national teams to further the sport’s development,” then you do not understand sport, economics and business. The rules were forced upon IOC by FIFA in order to do just the opposite of what you suggest. The rules are designed to protect and defend the greatest and most lucrative franchise in all of sport – the World Cup. FIFA will let nothing come close to competing with that.

        Interesting. I’m not familiar enough with soccer to know this but I wouldn’t doubt it. I’ve always wondered how the World Cup protected it’s turf against what would obviously be a major threat to it’s dominant position as THE soccer competition.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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        Participant
        Daniel Andrews on #71568

        I never said it isn’t part of them protecting the World Cup, but the Olympics doesn’t provide the same number of slots or the same qualifying formats as the World Cup does and is therefore not as prestigious. Think of the number of nations in the World Cup for soccer vs what the Olympics can allow. The players, the clubs, and FIFA understand that the World Cup is what makes their sport, the stars could care less about the Olympics. Winning the World Cup means more to most countries as do most World Championships.

        These rules soccer has in place are to prevent what has happened in Basketball. At the U23 level there are more nations on a more level playing field. FIFA understands this and with limited nations at the Olympics the better the competition the better it is for their sport and the more exposure they get to younger stars. Until Athens, it looked like a disaster for FIBA to allow NBA players to play.

        Also, the rest of the world doesn’t view the Olympics as the US does. Soccer has the World Cup, road cycling has the World Championships, the Grand Tours, and the Classics. Many other sports have world championships that the athletes feel are more prestigious than the Olympics.

        If anything Cricket deserves a spot in the Olympics over baseball. Heck Rugby deserves a spot over baseball.

        i added this link because someone brought sailing not being athletic or sporting. I’d like to put the entire MLB organization on these skiffs in the Yellow Sea during typhoon season. Imagine BB and McGwire managing one these going against Canseco and Tejeda.

        https://www.nbcolympics.com/video/player.html?assetid=0818_sd_sab_au_ce546&channelcode=sportsa

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        ex400 on #71577

        dbandre – The reason the World Cup is more prestigious has nothing to do with the number of slots. If the World Cup went to 16 slots like the Olympics, rather than the 32 they have now, do you think the prestige of the World Cup would go down? No, the reason the World Cup is more prestigious is that it the only world-wide competition that is open to all the best players. That is the way FIFA wants it, and that is the way FIFA keeps it. It is all about money and power. FIFA has the most of both and is not about to give any of it up. There is no altruism, no good-of-the-sport motivation in FIFA.

        By the way, if the Olympics were held during basketball season, you can be sure that the NBA would not release players for that. The WNBA does because their league has very little status, power or money compared to the IOC. For women’s professional basketball, the Olympics serve to develop and promote the brand. Men’s professional basketball has very little need for this, at least in the western world.

        Since a large proportion of the best baseball players are barred from the Olympics, I think they should get rid of baseball there. The whole idea of the Olympics is to bring the best together. But to say baseball is not a legitimate sport is kind of ridiculous. And I doubt that many sailors could hit a major league fast ball. LOL.

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        Participant
        Daniel Andrews on #71575

        dbandre – The reason the World Cup is more prestigious has nothing to do with the number of slots. If the World Cup went to 16 slots like the Olympics, rather than the 32 they have now, do you think the prestige of the World Cup would go down? No, the reason the World Cup is more prestigious is that it the only world-wide competition that is open to all the best players. That is the way FIFA wants it, and that is the way FIFA keeps it. It is all about money and power. FIFA has the most of both and is not about to give any of it up. There is no altruism, no good-of-the-sport motivation in FIFA.

        By the way, if the Olympics were held during basketball season, you can be sure that the NBA would not release players for that. The WNBA does because their league has very little status, power or money compared to the IOC. For women’s professional basketball, the Olympics serve to develop and promote the brand. Men’s professional basketball has very little need for this, at least in the western world.

        Since a large proportion of the best baseball players are barred from the Olympics, I think they should get rid of baseball there. The whole idea of the Olympics is to bring the best together. But to say baseball is not a legitimate sport is kind of ridiculous. And I doubt that many sailors could hit a major league fast ball. LOL.

        The World Cup would never be limited to 16 slots. It would reduce the money generated by bidding and the host country. The WC in the US was fantastic for the host cities in terms of economic development. The Olympics don’t get the best players to play because it’s 16 slots meaning more than a handful of the best would not be involved in the competition. It’s better served as a showcase of U23 talent.

        After getting our butts kicked on a regular basis in international basketball, the NBA was left no option but putting pro players in the international competition and then having to acquire as much foreign talent as possible into the league.

        Baseball is a sport were the US, Cuba, Japan, Mexico, Venezuela, and Dominican Republic dominate the sport. Cricket at least would have a more well rounded and global representation. Also, the reactions, coordination, and tracking involved in sailing are more complex than those involved in baseball.

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        ex400 on #71586

        The World Cup would never be limited to 16 slots. It would reduce the money generated by bidding and the host country.

        True, you are making my point for me.

        The Olympics don’t get the best players to play because it’s 16 slots.

        Not true, they don’t get the best players to play because FIFA won’t let them. Do you seriously think that if the Olympics went to a 32-team field, FIFA would change its policies and allow all the best players to participate? IOC makes the rules only after getting FIFA’s approval.

        As I have said, I think baseball should be tossed from the Olympics. But to argue about whether baseball or sailing requires more athletic skills is a monumental waste of time and intellectual effort. I am out.

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        Daniel Andrews on #71596

        If the best soccer players in world were to play in the Olympics then Italy, Germany, England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Spain, Brazil, Poland, Austria, Argentina, Mexico, Columbia would all be in the Olympics and they are all not there in fact England and Scotland make up GB/NI. Lets not forget Holland, Russia, Ukraine, Croatia, South Africa, and so on. The limited number of nations makes it hard to get all the best players into the Olympics.

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        ex400 on #71597

        All right, one last try. The Olympic rules, as dictated by FIFA, prohibit any team from having more than 2 players on its roster over the age of 23. This would eliminate roughly 90% of all the players on any of the teams you listed — or any other national team, for that matter. FIFA protects its franchise by insuring that national teams in the Olympics are far inferior to the national teams in World Cup.

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        Daniel Andrews on #71600

        ok we agree to disagree. As I stated and you verified it as a showcase of U23 talent in the 16 qualifying countries. It’s not even the 16 best countries.

      • Mike Young
        Keymaster
        Mike Young on #71738

        It’s Time to Kick Out Some Olympic Sports
        Thursday, Aug. 21, 2008 By HANNAH BEECH / BEIJING

        There’s no question they’re athletic, these muscled, agile women competing in Beijing. But the question remains: Should synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics remain Olympics sports? Both disciplines came of age in a not-so-distant era when women weren’t allowed to lift weights or pole vault or compete in the triathlon – all of which were inaugurated as female Olympic sports only as recently as 2000. (In the first modern Olympics in 1896, women were excluded altogether.) But today, with Title IX – the education amendment that allocates funds equally between genders – an entrenched part of American schools, and even Afghan and Omani women competing in the 100m dash, does it make sense to keep a pair of women-only sports in the Olympics?
        I think not. The problem with both events, in my mind, is that the girly bits overshadow the athletic parts. Synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics involve such copious amounts of cosmetics that they make a Texas beauty pageant look sedate. Yes, thighs strain with effort, but I’m distracted by the twirling toes and the bleached teeth framed by rictus smiles. And the accoutrements of rhythmic gymnastics – the hoop, the swirling ribbon – divert from the balletic grace of the athletes.

        At the synchronized swimming duet final on August 20, a pair of Chinese twins (Jiang Tingting and Jiang Wenwen), who came in fourth overall, performed a four-minute routine entitled “Little Birds Jumping and Flying Happily.” During their turn, the Canadians blew water from their mouths, as if they were comely fountains spouting water. The Russians, who took the gold with straight 10s for technical merit, wore swimsuits with such variegated sequins that I failed to take note of what the two Anastasias (Ermakova and Davydova) were actually doing. I know immense physicality and endurance is involved in each routine, and that the smiles mask burning lungs. The Russians, for instance, are known to practice eight hours a day. But effort – and a discreet set of nose-clips – doesn’t make it worthy of being an Olympic sport.

        As with synchronized swimming, rhythmic gymnastics was added as an Olympic sport at the Los Angeles Games in 1984. The sartorial rules are strict: leotards must not stray into, god forbid, tutu territory. A brazen flash of a bra strap can even result in points subtracted from the gymnast’s score. Curiously, in each Olympics, one of the five apparatuses isn’t contested. In Athens, the clubs, which look like a pair of brightly hued bowling pins, didn’t make an appearance. This year, it’s the bouncy ball that’s missing. Rhythmic gymnastics is certainly mesmerizing, but Cirque de Soleil mixed with a touch of the Bolshoi doesn’t deserve a spot at the Games. Similarly, a budding campaign to make yoga an Olympic discipline should be quashed.

        Currently, the only Olympic sport in which men compete and women don’t is in boxing. (Baseball is only for men, but it has a female counterpart, softball. And, in any case, both sports will be eliminated from the Games after this Olympics.) My suggestion: Get rid of synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics and bring in women’s boxing. In Athens, women’s wrestling was added for the first time. The sport now has an enthusiastic international following, from Japan and Kazakhstan to Spain and Canada. Outside of the Olympics, women’s boxing is already a serious sport. If it is embraced by the International Olympic Committee for London 2012, a decision that would likely be made by the end of this year, the Games would achieve true equity. That should elicit some true joy, not a fleet of forced smiles.

        ELITETRACK Founder

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