External load doesn’t necessarily limit force output

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One of the biggest misconceptions about weight training is that load dictates force production. While this CAN be true, it doesn’t have to be true. How could this be the case? Well, if we look at the work of my good friend Isaac, we see that there isn’t a mechanical limitation on how much force you can apply (there are some physiological limitations but we’ll talk about that later). That means you can easily develop far more force than the load on the bar (or whatever external loading is being used) would seemingly allow.  What happens when you do that? The bar, body, dumbell, throwing implement, whatever, will be move faster (or accelerate as Isaac would say). The main training implication from this is very important….that is, you can actually develop maximal absolute strength without maximal loads if you focus on maximizing the speed of movement. To be continued….

Mike Young

Mike Young

Founder of ELITETRACK at Athletic Lab
Mike has a BS in Exercise Physiology from Ohio University, an MSS in Coaching Science from Ohio University & a PhD in Biomechanics from LSU. Additionally, he has been recognized as a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) from the National Strength & Conditioning Association, a Level 3 coach by USA Track & Field, a Level 2 coach by USA Weightlifting.
Mike Young

@mikeyoung

📈Owner @AthleticLab 🏆Perf Dir @theNCCourage ⚽️Fit Coach @NorthCarolinaFC ➡️Proformance 📚Keynote Speaker & Author 📊Sport Science & Research🏃🏾‍♂️T&F 💪🏼S&C 🏋🏽‍♂️WL
“I know it’s bad – but everyone’s doing it” https://t.co/ZAs54BxC8O via @sethgodin https://t.co/AFQkSzgr1O - 7 hours ago
Mike Young
Mike Young
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