Singing or Screaming Muscles?

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This segment NPR Weekend Edition Saturday March 26, 2016 got me thinking. The segment was titled Glitch In Your Golf Swing? Listen To It Sing “Stanford professor Jonathan Berger turns golf stroke data into sound. A nice sound means it’s a good swing, a sour sound means something’s not right. In this revealing piece he tells Scott Simon how that helps people learn.” The same can be said for EMG data. If you isolate a muscle and put it a position of mechanical disadvantage it will scream at you – in other words it will show high level of activity. On the other hand when that muscle is integrated into a functional movement it will sing, it will show periods of high activity, less activity or even no activity when it works synergistically with it’s partners to produce smooth efficient coordinated movement. So the take home message when interpreting research from EMG data ask if the muscle is screaming or singing. If the muscle is singing then the EMG data is more valuable than if it is screaming. Just because you have high muscle activity does not mean it will transfer to efficient movement.

Vern Gambetta

Vern Gambetta

Director at Gambetta Sports Training Systems
Vern is the Director of Gambetta Sports Training Systems. He has been the a conditioning coach for several MLS teams as well as the conditioning consultant to the US Men's World Cup Soccer team. Vern is the former Director of Conditioning for the Chicago White Sox and New York Mets. He has lectured and conducted clinics in Canada, Japan, Australia and Europe and has authored six books and over one hundred articles related to coaching and sport performance in a variety of sports. He has a BA in teaching with a coaching minor and an MA in Education with an emphasis in physical education from Stanford University.
Vern Gambetta

@coachgambetta

Athletic Development Coach & Consultant. Founder of GAIN Network. Proud dad. Love to read everything.
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