Training Football Players for Indoor Sprinting

Posted In: What Would You Do?


  • Participant
    Beau Brehm on #72548

    You can tell if they’re running with their quads if they’re “bouncing” up and down as they run. They use their quads to try and actively “push” off the ground as opposed to “pulling” themselves down the track with their posterior chain. Push runners usually have longer ground contact times also. I learned this all from reading Chris Korfist article and, having played high school football last year, I would say he’s just about dead on with most of his stuff. This quad overuse happens with a lot of football players because their coaches completely neglect the posterior chain and have their kids squatting almost exclusively. Personally, I have found ISO HF Squats (bulgarian split-squats, I think) to be the best lower body strength builder. I know Chris himself likes to use ISO Single-legged deadlifts for glute work.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #72555

    You can tell if they’re running with their quads if they’re “bouncing” up and down as they run. They use their quads to try and actively “push” off the ground as opposed to “pulling” themselves down the track with their posterior chain. Push runners usually have longer ground contact times also. I learned this all from reading Chris Korfist article and, having played high school football last year, I would say he’s just about dead on with most of his stuff. This quad overuse happens with a lot of football players because their coaches completely neglect the posterior chain and have their kids squatting almost exclusively. Personally, I have found ISO HF Squats (bulgarian split-squats, I think) to be the best lower body strength builder. I know Chris himself likes to use ISO Single-legged deadlifts for glute work.

    I’m gonna stay away from this one…at least for the time being. 😉

    ELITETRACK Founder


    Participant
    utfootball4 on #72556

    [quote author="beau_zo_brehm" date="1221973826"]You can tell if they’re running with their quads if they’re “bouncing” up and down as they run. They use their quads to try and actively “push” off the ground as opposed to “pulling” themselves down the track with their posterior chain. Push runners usually have longer ground contact times also. I learned this all from reading Chris Korfist article and, having played high school football last year, I would say he’s just about dead on with most of his stuff. This quad overuse happens with a lot of football players because their coaches completely neglect the posterior chain and have their kids squatting almost exclusively. Personally, I have found ISO HF Squats (bulgarian split-squats, I think) to be the best lower body strength builder. I know Chris himself likes to use ISO Single-legged deadlifts for glute work.

    I’m gonna stay away from this one…at least for the time being. ;)[/quote]

    Why? I would love to hear your thoughts.


    Participant
    Beau Brehm on #72598

    I would also like to know what you think…


    Participant
    Daniel Andrews on #72599

    I am not huge Korfist fan. He did do some things at the high school with the largest enrollment in the state of Illinois, but it wasn’t something special and he received way too much credit. I think he’s a bit off on his science and biomechanics analysis.

    By implying Quad overuse one can reason excessive backside mechanics are going to be prevalent and not front side. It’s excessive pushing that causes the symptom of excessive backside mechanics. Excessive pushing results in a longer gct and it hinders the ability to reposition the limbs for maximal velocity mechanics. However with football players, I would tend to think of lower center of gravity, shorter front side recovery, and long gct’s that allow for change of direction and straight line acceleration which are important to football players. Which I believe results in the following quote from Mike earlier in this thread.

    Yeah. Most fb guys tend to run really squatty with low knee recovery and excessive backside mechanics.

    As for helping the footballers, stay away from pushing cues and concentrate on transition cues and use sprint-float-sprint(ins and outs) almost exclusively with them. I am pretty sure Mike and many others on this board would be able to identify muscular imbalances that might present problems and if there are no imbalances then it’s a motor learning problem. Something that is not easy to overcome with athletes at the age of 22. Their problem ends up being a track and field training age of 2 years compared to 6-10 years that is typical of collegiate track athletes.

    Personally I would hate having to do what I just wrote, but going whole-part-whole with the footballers maybe a problem and seeing if they grasp the concept of maintaining velocity works better.


    Participant
    johnstrang on #72600

    [quote author="beau_zo_brehm" date="1221973826"]You can tell if they’re running with their quads if they’re “bouncing” up and down as they run. They use their quads to try and actively “push” off the ground as opposed to “pulling” themselves down the track with their posterior chain. Push runners usually have longer ground contact times also. I learned this all from reading Chris Korfist article and, having played high school football last year, I would say he’s just about dead on with most of his stuff. This quad overuse happens with a lot of football players because their coaches completely neglect the posterior chain and have their kids squatting almost exclusively. Personally, I have found ISO HF Squats (bulgarian split-squats, I think) to be the best lower body strength builder. I know Chris himself likes to use ISO Single-legged deadlifts for glute work.

    I’m gonna stay away from this one…at least for the time being. ;)[/quote]

    Ive also seen people that run do the bouncing because their foot to ground contact happens out in front of their hips creating a breaking motion and causing them to almost bounce up and down as they run. Similar concept to the high jump where you plant that foot out in in front and create a vertical movement instead of horizontal.

    As far as football players go my own experience is just that they just need to re learn track form. I agree with that working on the transition and basically all phases of the race.


    Participant
    davan on #75079

    http://www.trackshark.com/features/tomborish/310/Indoor+track+&+field+training+update:+LSU+Tigers.html

    “Perhaps the most talented athlete you have on your team coming back this season is Trindon Holliday. How will you handle his transition from the football season to the indoor season? Does he have a different schedule to adopt to considering he’ll be joining the team at a later time in training?

    Trindon’s training will be determined after the football bowl selection has taken place. Generally speaking, I give him the option of taking one week off after the bowl game is completed, no matter when the bowl game takes place. Upon his arrival to training sessions, he does the same training the Group 1 sprinters are doing, but at a reduced volume and intensity level for the first four weeks. He normally experiences a high level of muscle soreness from the weight training and sprint training. I always have to remind myself and Trindon that he just finished a training program with football where the volume of training is extremely low and is joining a program where our intensity and volume is high by our standards in the month of January and February.”


    Participant
    utfootball4 on #75080

    Good information, interesting strength program.


    Participant
    utfootball4 on #75644

    what do you think about this article Mike, alot of differnt ol’s and speed squats in each training session.

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #75658

    what do you think about this article Mike, alot of differnt ol’s and speed squats in each training session.

    Yep. Nothing really new to me though. Coach Shaver does much more ‘power’ development than ‘strength’ development in the weight room. His athletes tend to be beasts on the track but don’t put up huge weight room numbers.

    ELITETRACK Founder


    Participant
    utfootball4 on #75660

    [quote author="utfootball4" date="1230007279"]what do you think about this article Mike, alot of differnt ol’s and speed squats in each training session.

    Yep. Nothing really new to me though. Coach Shaver does much more ‘power’ development than ‘strength’ development in the weight room. His athletes tend to be beasts on the track but don’t put up huge weight room numbers.[/quote]

    His strength program look so random (speed squats for 8 reps, 3 diff ol’s etc) compare to DP or Boo. Just curious what are the %’s for those speed squats?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #75661

    Not sure I really understand the question but as far as I can remember they were 1/2 or 1/4 squats with relatively light weight moving the bar fast and the athlete would move in to a position of hip tuck / posterior pelvic tilt at the top of every squat.

    ELITETRACK Founder


    Participant
    utfootball4 on #75662

    Not sure I really understand the question but as far as I can remember they were 1/2 or 1/4 squats with relatively light weight moving the bar fast and the athlete would move in to a position of hip tuck / posterior pelvic tilt at the top of every squat.

    Sorry, Just curious what are the %’s for those speed squats?

    Mike Young
    Keymaster
    Mike Young on #75663

    To be honest I wouldn’t feel comfortable saying because I never really looked over the training plans too much to know the precise %s…just watched what they were doing mostly. I’d say that 90% of the men were using between 135 and 225 lbs although there did seem to be some cycles where the load would go up a little.

    ELITETRACK Founder

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